WOOO YVETHE SANTIAGO

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  • -26

WOOO YVETHE SANTIAGO

Postby Thaiboy » Mon Nov 17, 2014 5:16 am

    

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Re: WOOO YVETHE SANTIAGO

Postby markfrancismahusay » Mon Nov 17, 2014 5:41 am

So here we go again, bashing right and left. Starting war again here? Sorry Thai Boy, we will not buy this gimmick. Stop nonsense post!
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  • -10

Re: WOOO YVETHE SANTIAGO

Postby ali2009 » Mon Nov 17, 2014 5:43 am

PLEASE SOMEBODY FIRE MADAME STELLA!!! HOW COME THIS UGLY BI*CH REPRESENT US???
NOYO IS INDIA'S 3RD Miss Universe
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Re: WOOO YVETHE SANTIAGO

Postby markita » Mon Nov 17, 2014 5:45 am

yeah. i agree francis,
we don't want bad karma right?

and yeah thaiboy, ur sister is competing too. so chillax
:-P

mga teh wag na patulan. :=p maglagay nalang ng princess sarah memes. haha
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Re: WOOO YVETHE SANTIAGO

Postby jansenism » Mon Nov 17, 2014 5:48 am

Açai (Euterpe oleracea) Although açai berries are a longstanding food source for indigenous people of the Amazon, there is no evidence that they have historically served a medicinal, as opposed to nutritional role. In spite of their recent popularity in the United States as a dietary supplement, there is currently no evidence for their effectiveness for any health-related purpose.[5]
Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) leaves are used to lower cholesterol, as well as for kidney and urinary tract ailments, although there is insufficient scientific evidence for its efficacy.[6]
Aloe vera leaves are widely used to heal burns, wounds and other skin ailments.[7][8]
Arnica (Arnica montana) is used as an anti-inflammatory[9] and for osteoarthritis.[10]
Ashoka (Saraca indica) is used in Ayurvedic traditions to treat gynecological disorders. The bark is also used to combat oedema or swelling.[11]
Asthma weed (Euphorbia hirta) has been used traditionally in Asia to treat bronchitic asthma and laryngeal spasm.[12][13] It is used in the Philippines for dengue fever.[14][15]
Astragalus (Astragalus propinquus) has long been used in traditional Chinese medicine to strengthen the immune system, and is used in modern China to treat hepatitis and as an adjunctive therapy in cancer.[16]
B[edit]
Barberry (Berberis vulgaris) has a long history of medicinal use, dating back to the Middle Ages particularly among Native Americans. Uses have included skin ailments, scurvy and gastro-intestinal ailments.[17]
Belladonna (Atropa belladonna), although toxic, was used historically in Italy by women to enlarge their pupils, as well as a sedative, among other uses. The name itself means "beautiful woman" in Italian.[18]
Bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) used to treat diarrhea, scurvy, and other conditions.[19]
Bitter gourd (Momordica charantia) is used as an agent to reduce the blood glucose level.[20]
Bitter leaf (Vernonia amygdalina) is used by both primates and indigenous peoples in Africa to treat intestinal ailments such as dysentery[21][22]
Bitter orange (Citrus × aurantium) used in traditional Chinese medicine and by indigenous peoples of the Amazon for nausea, indigestion and constipation.[23]
Black cohosh (Actaea racemosa) historically used for arthritis and muscle pain, used more recently for conditions related to menopause and menstruation.[24]
Blessed thistle (Cnicus benedictus) was used during the Middle Ages to treat bubonic plague. In modern times, herbal teas made from blessed thistle are used for loss of appetite, indigestion and other purposes.[25]
Blueberries (genus Vaccinium) are of current medical interest as an antioxidant[26][27] and for urinary tract ailments[28]
Burdock (Arctium lappa) has been used traditionally as a diuretic and to lower blood sugar[29] and, in traditional Chinese medicine as a treatment for sore throat and symptoms of the common cold.[30]
C[edit]

Chili peppers
Cat's claw (Uncaria tomentosa) has a long history of use in South America to prevent and treat disease.[31]
Cayenne (Capsicum annuum) is a type of chili that has been used as both food and medicine for thousands of years. Uses have included reducing pain and swelling, lowering triglyceride and cholesterol levels and fighting viruses and harmful bacteria, due to high levels of Vitamin C.[32][33][34]
Celery (Apium graveolens) seed is used only occasionally in tradition medicine. Modern usage is primarily as a diuretic.[35]
Chamomille (Matricaria recutita and Anthemis nobilis) has been used over thousands of years for a variety of conditions, including sleeplessness, anxiety, and gastrointestinal conditions such as upset stomach, gas, and diarrhea.[36]
Chaparral (Larrea tridentata) leaves and twigs are used by Native Americans to make an herbal tea used for a variety of conditions, including arthritis, cancer and a number of others. Subsequent studies have been extremely variable, at best. Chaparral has also been shown to have high liver toxicity, and has led to kidney failure, and is not recommended for any use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or American Cancer Society.[37][38]
Chasteberry (Vitex agnus-castus) used over thousands of years for menstrual problems, and to stimulate lactation.[39]
Chili (Capsicum frutescens)'s active ingredient, capsaicine, is the basic of commercial pain-relief ointments in Western medicine. The low incidence of heart attack in Thais may be related to capsaicine's fibronolytic action (dissolving blood clots).[40]
Cinchona is a genus of about 38 species of trees whose bark is a source of alkaloids, including quinine. Its use as a febrifuge was first popularized in the 17th century by Peruvian Jesuits.[41]
Clove (Syzygium aromaticum) is used for upset stomach and as an expectorant, among other purposes. The oil is used topically to treat toothache.[42]
Coffee senna (Cassia occidentalis) is used in a wide variety of roles in traditional medicine, including in particular as a broad-spectrum internal and external antimicrobial, for liver disorders, for intestinal worms and other parasites and as an immune-system stimulant.[43][44]
Comfrey (Symphytum officinale) has been used as a vulnerary and to reduce inflammation.[45] It was also used internally in the past, for stomach and other ailments, but its toxicity has led a number of other countries, including Canada, Brazil, Australia, and the United Kingdom, to severely restrict or ban the use of comfrey.[46]
Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) used historically as a vulnerary and for urinary disorders, diarrhea, diabetes, stomach ailments, and liver problems. Modern usage has concentrated on urinary tract related problems.[47]
D[edit]

Dandelion flower
Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) was most commonly used historically to treat liver diseases, kidney diseases, and spleen problems[48]
Digitalis (Digitalis lanata), or foxglove, came into use in treating cardiac disease in late 18th century England in spite of its high toxicity.a Its use has been almost entirely replaced by the pharmaceutical derivative Digoxin, which has a shorter half-life in the body, and whose toxicity is therefore more easily managed.[49] Digoxin is used as an antiarrhythmic agent and inotrope[50]
Dong quai (Angelica sinensis) has been used for thousands of years in Asia, primarily in women's health.[51]
E[edit]
Elderberry (Sambucus nigra) berries and leaves have traditionally been used to treat pain, swelling, infections, coughs, and skin conditions and, more recently, flu, common cold, fevers, constipation, and sinus infections.[52]
Ephedra (Ephedra sinica) has been used for more than 5,000 years in traditional Chinese medicine for respiratory ailments.[53] Products containing ephedra for weight loss, energy and athletic performance, particularly those also containing caffeine, have been linked to stroke, heart arrhythmia, and even death. Such products have been banned in the United States since December, 2003. Other dietary supplements containing ephedra were similarly banned in February, 2004.[54]
Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus) leaves were widely used in traditional medicine as a febrifuge.[55] Eucalyptus oil is commonly used in over-the-counter cough and cold medications, as well as for an analgesic.[56]
European Mistletoe (Viscum album) has been used to treat seizures, headaches, and other conditions.[57]
Evening primrose (Oenothera spp.) oil has been used since the 1930s for eczema, and more recently as an anti-inflammatory[58]
F[edit]
Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) has long been used to treat symptoms of menopause, and digestive ailments. More recently, it has been used to treat diabetes, loss of appetite and other conditions[59]
Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) has been used for centuries for fevers, headaches, stomach aches, toothaches, insect bites and other conditions.[60]
Flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum) is most commonly used as a laxative. Flaxseed oil is used for different conditions, including arthritis[61]
G[edit]

Garlic bulbs
Garlic (Allium sativum) widely used as an antibiotic[62][63][64][65] and, more recently, for treating cardiovascular disease[66][67]
Ginger (Zingiber officinale) is used to relieve nausea[68]
Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba) leaf extract has been used to treat asthma, bronchitis, fatigue, and tinnitus[69]
Ginseng (Panax ginseng and Panax quinquefolius) has been used medicinally, in particular in Asia, for over 2,000 years, and is widely used in modern society.[70]
Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) was used traditionally by Native Americans to treat skin diseases, ulcers, and gonorrhea. More recently, the herb has been used respiratory tract and a number of other infections[71]
Grape (Vitis vinifera) leaves and fruit have been used medicinally since the ancient Greeks.[72]
Guava (Psidium guajava) has a rich history of use in traditional medicine. It is traditionally used to treat diarrhea; however, evidence of its effectiveness is very limited.[73][74]
H[edit]
Hawthorn (specifically Crataegus monogyna and Crataegus laevigata) fruit has been used since the first century for heart disease. Other uses include digestive and kidney problems.[75]
Henna (Lawsonia Inermis) exhibits potential anti bacterial activity. The alcoholic extract of root have antibacterial activity due to presence of flavonoid and alkaloids in it.[76] Henna is also khown to show anti-Inflammatory, antipyretic, and analgesic Effects in experimental animals.[77]
Hoodia (Hoodia gordonii) is traditionally used by Kalahari San (Bushmen) to reduce hunger and thirst. It is currently marketed as an appetite suppressant.[78]
Horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum) seeds, leaves, bark, and flowers have been used medicinally for many centuries. The raw plant materials are toxic unless processed.[79]
Horsetail (Equisetum arvense) dates back to ancient Roman and Greek medicine, when it was used to stop bleeding, heal ulcers and wounds, and treat tuberculosis and kidney problems.[80]

J[edit]
Jamaica dogwood (Piscidia erythrina / Piscidia piscipula) is used in traditional medicine for the treatment of insomnia and anxiety, despite serious safety concerns.[81] A 2006 study suggested medicinal potential.[82]
K[edit]
Kava (Piper methysticum) has been used for centuries in the South Pacific to make a ceremonial drink with sedative and anesthetic properties. It is used as a soporific, as well as for asthma and urinary tract infection[83]
Khat is a mild stimulant used for thousands of years in Yemen, and is banned today in many countries. Contains the amphetamine-like substance cathinone.
Konjac (Amorphophallus konjac) is a significant dietary source of glucomannan,[84][85] which is used in treating obesity,[86] constipation,[87] and reducing cholesterol.[88]
Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) Kratom is known to prevent or delay withdrawal symptoms in an opiate dependent individual, and it is often used to mitigate cravings thereafter. It can also be used for other medicinal purposes. Kratom has been traditionally used in regions such as Malaysia, Thailand, and Indonesia.
Kanna (Sceletium tortuosum) African treatment for depression. Suggested to be an SSRI or have similar effects, but unknown MOA.
L[edit]

Lavender blossoms
Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) was traditionally used as an antiseptic and for mental health purposes. It was also used ancient Egypt in mummifying bodies. There is little scientific evidence that lavender is effective for most mental health uses.[89]
Lemon (Citrus limon), along with other citruses, has a long history of use in Chinese and Indian traditional medicine.[90] In contemporary use, honey and lemon is common for treating coughs and sore throat.
Licorice root (Glycyrrhiza glabra) has a long history of medicinal usage in Eastern and Western medicine. Uses include stomach ulcers, bronchitis, and sore throat, as well as infections caused by viruses, such as hepatitis.[91]
Lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) Sacred lotus has been the subject of a number of in-vitro and animal studies, exploring its pharmacologic effects, including antioxidant, hepatoprotective, immunomodulatory, anti-infective, hyperlipidemic, and psychopharmacologic activity[92] although clinical trials are lacking.
M[edit]
Marigold (Calendula officinalis), or calendula, has a long history of use in treating wounds and soothing skin[93]
Marsh mallow (Althaea officinalis) has been used for over 2,000 years as both a food and a medicine[4]
Moringa oleifera is used for food and traditional medicine. It is undergoing preliminary research to investigate potential properties of its nutrients and phytochemicals

MoringaplantinGarden
Milk thistle (Silybum marianum) has been used for thousands of years for a variety of medicinal purposes, in particular liver problems.[94]
N[edit]
Neem (Azadirachta indica), used in India to treat worms, malaria, rheumatism and skin infections among many other things. Its many uses have led to neem being called "the village dispensary" in India.[95]
Noni (Morinda citrifolia) has a history of use as for joint pain and skin conditions.[96]
O[edit]
Opium Poppy (Papaver somniferum) is the plant source of morphine, used for pain relief. Morphine made from the refined and modified sap is used for pain control in terminal patients. Dried sap was used as a traditional medicine until the 19th century.[citation needed]
Oregano (Origanum vulgare) Used as an abortifacient in folk medicine in some parts of Bolivia and other north western South American countries, though no evidence of efficacy exists in Western medicine. Hippocrates used oregano as an antiseptic, as well as a cure for stomach and respiratory ailments. A Cretan oregano (O. dictamnus) is still used today in Greece as a palliative for sore throat. Evidence of efficacy in this matter is lacking.
P[edit]
Papaya (Carica papaya) is used for treating wounds.[97]
Peppermint (Mentha x piperita) oil, from a cross between water mint and spearmint, has a history of medicinal use for a variety of conditions, including nausea, indigestion, and symptoms of the common cold.[98]
Purple coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) and other species of Echinacea has been used for at least 400 years by Native Americans to treat infections and wounds, and as a general "cure-all" (panacea). It is currently used for symptoms associated with cold and flu[99][100]
Passion Flower (Passiflora) - Thought to have Anti-depressant properties. Unknown MOA. Used in traditional medicine to aid with sleep or depression.

R[edit]
Red clover (Trifolium pratense) is an ingredient in some recipes for essiac tea. Research has found no benefit for any human health conditions.[101]
Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) has been used medicinally from ancient times.
S[edit]
Sage (Salvia officinalis), shown to improve cognitive function in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease[102][103]
Syrian Rue (aka Harmal) (Peganum harmala) - MAOI. Can be used as an anti-depressant, but carries significant risk. Used in traditional shamanistic rites in the amazon, and is a component of Ayahuasca, Caapi or Yajé (which is actually usually Banisteriopsis caapi but has the same active alkaloids).
St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum), evaluated for use as an antidepressant, but with ambiguous results.[104][105][106]
Saw palmetto (Serenoa repens) was used medicinally by the Seminole tribe[107]
Summer savory (Satureja hortensis) extracts show antibacterial and antifungal effects on several species including some of the antibiotic resistant strains.[108][109][110]
T[edit]
Tea tree oil (Melaleuca alternifolia) has been used medicinally for centuries by Australian aboriginal people. Modern usage is primarily as an antibacterial or antifungal agent.[111]
Thunder God Vine (Tripterygium wilfordii) is used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat inflammation or an overactive immune system[112]
Thyme (Thymus vulgaris) is used to treat bronchitis and cough. It serves as an antispasmotic and expectorant in this role. It has also been used in many other medicinal roles in Asian and Ayurvedic medicine, although it has not been shown to be effective in non-respiratory medicinal roles.[113]
Tulasi (Ocimum tenuiflorum or Holy Basil) is used for a variety of purposes in Ayurvedic medicine.[114]
Turmeric (Curcuma longa), a spice that lends its distinctive yellow color to Indian curries, has long been used in Ayurvedic and traditional Chinese medicine to aid digestion and liver function, relieve arthritis pain, and regulate menstruation.[115]
U[edit]

Valerian flowers
Umckaloabo, or South African Geranium (Pelargonium sidoides), used in treating acute bronchitis[116]
V[edit]
Valerian (Valeriana officinalis) has been used since at least ancient Greece and Rome for sleep disorders and anxiety.[117]
W[edit]
White willow (Salix alba) is a plant source of salicylic acid, a chemical related to aspirin, although more likely to cause stomach upset as a side effect than aspirin itself. Used from ancient times for the same uses as aspirin.[118]

Y[edit]
Yerba santa (Eriodictyon crassifolium) was used by the Chumash people to keep airways open for proper breathing.[119]
Sana, birthday candle ka na lang -- habang pinapatay kita, nagpapalakpakan sila.
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Re: WOOO YVETHE SANTIAGO

Postby UWIE » Mon Nov 17, 2014 5:51 am

She's lovely . I don't care if she had her nose done. Philippine representatives are top notch! Whether you like it or not, The Philippines is always a contender for the crown.
REVENGE IS A DISH BEST SERVED COLD!!!!
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Re: WOOO YVETHE SANTIAGO

Postby Adam324 » Mon Nov 17, 2014 6:05 am

Ebola virus disease


Ebola virus disease (EVD; also Ebola hemorrhagic fever, or EHF), or simply Ebola, is a disease of humans and other primates caused by ebolaviruses. Signs and symptoms typically start between two days and three weeks after contracting the virus as a fever, sore throat, muscle pain, and headaches. Then, vomiting, diarrhea and rash usually follow, along with decreased function of the liver and kidneys. At this time some people begin to bleed both internally and externally.[1] The disease has a high risk of death, killing between 25 percent and 90 percent of those infected with the virus, averaging out at 50 percent.[1] This is often due to low blood pressure from fluid loss, and typically follows six to sixteen days after symptoms appear.[2]

The virus spreads by direct contact with blood or other body fluids of an infected human or other animal.[1] Infection with the virus may also occur by direct contact with a recently contaminated item or surface.[1] Spread of the disease through the air has not been documented in the natural environment.[3] The virus may be spread by semen or breast milk for several weeks to months after recovery.[1][4] Fruit bats are believed to be the normal carrier in nature, able to spread the virus without being affected by it. Humans become infected by contact with the bats or with a living or dead animal that has been infected by bats. After human infection occurs, the disease may also spread between people. Other diseases such as malaria, cholera, typhoid fever, meningitis and other viral hemorrhagic fevers may resemble EVD. Blood samples are tested for viral RNA, viral antibodies or for the virus itself to confirm the diagnosis.[1]

Control of outbreaks requires coordinated medical services, along with a certain level of community engagement. The medical services include: rapid detection of cases of disease, contact tracing of those who have come into contact with infected individuals, quick access to laboratory services, proper care and management of those who are infected and proper disposal of the dead through cremation or burial.[1][5] Prevention includes limiting the spread of disease from infected animals to humans.[1] This may be done by handling potentially infected bush meat only while wearing protective clothing and by thoroughly cooking it before consumption.[1] It also includes wearing proper protective clothing and washing hands when around a person with the disease.[1] Samples of body fluids and tissues from people with the disease should be handled with special caution.[1]

No specific treatment or vaccine for the virus is commercially available. Efforts to help those who are infected are supportive; they include either oral rehydration therapy (drinking slightly sweetened and salty water) or giving intravenous fluids as well as treating symptoms. This supportive care improves outcomes. EVD was first identified in 1976 in an area of Sudan (now part of South Sudan), and in Zaire (now the Democratic Republic of the Congo). The disease typically occurs in outbreaks in tropical regions of sub-Saharan Africa.[1] Through 2013, the World Health Organization reported a total of 1,716 cases in 24 outbreaks.[1][6] The largest outbreak to date is the ongoing epidemic in West Africa, which is centered in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia.[7][8][9] As of 11 November 2014, this outbreak has 14,413 reported cases resulting in 5,504 deaths.[10][11]

Contents [hide]
1 Signs and symptoms
2 Cause
2.1 Transmission
2.2 Initial case
2.3 Reservoir
2.4 Virology
3 Pathophysiology
4 Diagnosis
4.1 Nonspecific laboratory testing
4.2 Specific laboratory testing
4.3 Differential diagnosis
5 Prevention
5.1 Infection control
5.2 Putting on and removing protective equipment
5.3 Isolation
5.4 Contact tracing
6 Treatment
6.1 Standard support
6.2 Intensive care
6.3 Alternative medicine
7 Prognosis
8 Epidemiology
8.1 1976
8.2 1995 to 2012
8.3 2013 to 2014 West African outbreak
8.4 2014 DRC Congo outbreak
8.5 2014 spread outside of Africa
9 Society and culture
9.1 Weaponization
9.2 Literature
10 Other animals
10.1 Wild animals
10.2 Domestic animals
10.3 Reston virus
11 Research
11.1 Medications
11.2 Blood products
11.3 Vaccine
12 See also
13 References
14 External links
Signs and symptoms

Signs and symptoms of Ebola[12]
The length of time between exposure to the virus and the development of symptoms of the disease is usually 2 to 21 days.[1][12] Estimates based on mathematical models predict that around 5% of cases may take greater than 21 days to develop.[13]

Symptoms usually begin with a sudden influenza-like stage characterized by feeling tired, fever, pain in the muscles and joints, headache, and sore throat.[1][14][15] The fever is usually higher than 38.3 °C (100.9 °F).[16] This is often followed by vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal pain.[15] Next, shortness of breath and chest pain may occur, along with swelling, headaches and confusion.[15] In about half of the cases, the skin may develop a maculopapular rash (a flat red area covered with small bumps).[16]

In some cases, internal and external bleeding may occur.[1] This typically begins five to seven days after the first symptoms.[17] All infected people show some decreased blood clotting.[16] Bleeding from mucous membranes or from sites of needle punctures has been reported in 40–50 percent of cases.[18] This may result in the vomiting of blood, coughing up of blood or blood in stool.[19] Bleeding into the skin may create petechiae, purpura, ecchymoses or hematomas (especially around needle injection sites).[20] Bleeding into the whites of the eyes may also occur. Heavy bleeding is uncommon, and if it occurs, it is usually located within the gastrointestinal tract.[16][21]

Recovery may begin between 7 and 14 days after the start of symptoms.[15] Death, if it occurs, follows typically 6 to 16 days from the start of symptoms and is often due to low blood pressure from fluid loss.[2] In general, bleeding often indicates a worse outcome, and this blood loss may result in death.[14] People are often in a coma near the end of life.[15] Those who survive often have ongoing muscle and joint pain, liver inflammation, and decreased hearing among other difficulties.[15] Additionally they develop antibodies against Ebola that last at least 10 years but it is unclear if they are immune to repeated infections.[22]

Cause
Main articles: Ebolavirus (taxonomic group) and Ebola virus (specific virus)
EVD in humans is caused by four of five viruses of the genus Ebolavirus. The four are Bundibugyo virus (BDBV), Sudan virus (SUDV), Taï Forest virus (TAFV) and one simply called Ebola virus (EBOV, formerly Zaire Ebola virus).[23] EBOV, species Zaire ebolavirus, is the most dangerous of the known EVD-causing viruses, and is responsible for the largest number of outbreaks.[24] The fifth virus, Reston virus (RESTV), is not thought to cause disease in humans, but has caused disease in other primates.[25][26] All five viruses are closely related to marburgviruses.[23]

Transmission

Life cycles of the Ebolavirus
Between people, Ebola disease spreads only by direct contact with the blood or body fluids of a person who has developed symptoms of the disease.[27][28][29] Body fluids that may contain ebolaviruses include saliva, mucus, vomit, feces, sweat, tears, breast milk, urine and semen.[22] The WHO states that only people who are very sick are able to spread Ebola disease in saliva, and whole virus has not been reported to be transmitted through sweat. Most people spread the virus through blood, feces and vomit.[30] Entry points for the virus include the nose, mouth, eyes, open wounds, cuts and abrasions.[22] Ebola may be spread through large droplets; however, this is believed to occur only when a person is very sick.[31] This can happen if a person is splashed with droplets.[31] Contact with surfaces or objects contaminated by the virus, particularly needles and syringes, may also transmit the infection.[32][33] The virus is able to survive on objects for a few hours in a dried state and can survive for a few days within body fluids.[22]

The Ebola virus may be able to persist for up to 7 weeks in the semen of survivors after they recovered, which could lead to infections via sexual intercourse.[1] Ebola may also occur in the breast milk of women after recovery, and it is not known when it is safe to breastfeed again.[4] Otherwise, people who have recovered are not infectious.[32]

The potential for widespread infections in countries with medical systems capable of observing correct medical isolation procedures is considered low.[34] Usually when someone has symptoms of the disease, they are unable to travel without assistance.[35]

Dead bodies remain infectious; thus, people handling human remains in practices such as traditional burial rituals or more modern processes such as embalming are at risk.[34] 60% of the cases of Ebola infections in Guinea during the 2014 outbreak are believed to have been contracted via unprotected (or unsuitably protected) contact with infected corpses during certain Guinean burial rituals.[36][37]

Health-care workers treating those who are infected are at greatest risk of getting infected themselves.[32] The risk increases when these workers do not have appropriate protective clothing such as masks, gowns, gloves and eye protection; do not wear it properly; or handle contaminated clothing incorrectly.[32] This risk is particularly common in parts of Africa where health systems function poorly and where the disease mostly occurs.[38] Hospital-acquired transmission has also occurred in some African countries resulting from the reuse of needles.[39][40] Some health-care centers caring for people with the disease do not have running water.[41] In the United States the spread to two medial workers treating an infected patients prompted criticism of inadequate training and procedures.[42]

Airborne transmission
Human to human transmission of EBOV through the air has not been reported to occur during EVD outbreaks[3] and airborne transmission has only been demonstrated in very strict laboratory conditions in non-human primates.[27][33] The apparent lack of airborne transmission among humans may be due to levels of the virus in the lungs and other parts of the respiratory system that are insufficient to cause new infections.[43] Spread of EBOV by water or food, other than bushmeat, has also not been observed.[32][33] No spread by mosquitos or other insects has been reported.[32]

A number of studies examining airborne transmission have broadly concluded that transmission from pigs to primates may happen without contact, because unlike humans and primates, pigs with EVD get very high ebolavirus concentrations in their lungs, and not their bloodstream.[44] Therefore pigs with EVD can spread the disease through droplets in the air or on the ground when they sneeze or cough.[45] By contrast, humans and other primates accumulate the virus throughout their body and specifically in their blood, but not very much in their lungs.[45] It is believed that this is the reason researchers have observed pig to primate transmission without physical contact, but no evidence has been found of primates being infected without actual contact, even in experiments where infected and uninfected primates shared the same air.[44][45]

Initial case

Bushmeat being prepared for cooking in Ghana. In Africa, wild animals including fruit bats are hunted for food and are referred to as bushmeat.[46][47] In equatorial Africa, human consumption of bushmeat has been linked to animal-to-human transmission of diseases, including Ebola.[48]
Although it is not entirely clear how Ebola initially spreads from animals to humans, the spread is believed to involve direct contact with an infected wild animal or fruit bat.[32] Besides bats, other wild animals sometimes infected with EBOV include several monkey species, chimpanzees, gorillas, baboons and duikers.[49]

Animals may become infected when they eat fruit partially eaten by bats carrying the virus.[50] Fruit production, animal behavior and other factors may trigger outbreaks among animal populations.[50]

Evidence indicates that both domestic dogs and pigs can also be infected with EBOV.[51] Dogs do not appear to develop symptoms when they carry the virus, and pigs appear to be able to transmit the virus to at least some primates.[51] Although some dogs in an area in which a human outbreak occurred had antibodies to EBOV, it is unclear whether they played a role in spreading the disease to people.[51]





Ebola virus disease (EVD; also Ebola hemorrhagic fever, or EHF), or simply Ebola, is a disease of humans and other primates caused by ebolaviruses. Signs and symptoms typically start between two days and three weeks after contracting the virus as a fever, sore throat, muscle pain, and headaches. Then, vomiting, diarrhea and rash usually follow, along with decreased function of the liver and kidneys. At this time some people begin to bleed both internally and externally.[1] The disease has a high risk of death, killing between 25 percent and 90 percent of those infected with the virus, averaging out at 50 percent.[1] This is often due to low blood pressure from fluid loss, and typically follows six to sixteen days after symptoms appear.[2]

The virus spreads by direct contact with blood or other body fluids of an infected human or other animal.[1] Infection with the virus may also occur by direct contact with a recently contaminated item or surface.[1] Spread of the disease through the air has not been documented in the natural environment.[3] The virus may be spread by semen or breast milk for several weeks to months after recovery.[1][4] Fruit bats are believed to be the normal carrier in nature, able to spread the virus without being affected by it. Humans become infected by contact with the bats or with a living or dead animal that has been infected by bats. After human infection occurs, the disease may also spread between people. Other diseases such as malaria, cholera, typhoid fever, meningitis and other viral hemorrhagic fevers may resemble EVD. Blood samples are tested for viral RNA, viral antibodies or for the virus itself to confirm the diagnosis.[1]

Control of outbreaks requires coordinated medical services, along with a certain level of community engagement. The medical services include: rapid detection of cases of disease, contact tracing of those who have come into contact with infected individuals, quick access to laboratory services, proper care and management of those who are infected and proper disposal of the dead through cremation or burial.[1][5] Prevention includes limiting the spread of disease from infected animals to humans.[1] This may be done by handling potentially infected bush meat only while wearing protective clothing and by thoroughly cooking it before consumption.[1] It also includes wearing proper protective clothing and washing hands when around a person with the disease.[1] Samples of body fluids and tissues from people with the disease should be handled with special caution.[1]

No specific treatment or vaccine for the virus is commercially available. Efforts to help those who are infected are supportive; they include either oral rehydration therapy (drinking slightly sweetened and salty water) or giving intravenous fluids as well as treating symptoms. This supportive care improves outcomes. EVD was first identified in 1976 in an area of Sudan (now part of South Sudan), and in Zaire (now the Democratic Republic of the Congo). The disease typically occurs in outbreaks in tropical regions of sub-Saharan Africa.[1] Through 2013, the World Health Organization reported a total of 1,716 cases in 24 outbreaks.[1][6] The largest outbreak to date is the ongoing epidemic in West Africa, which is centered in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia.[7][8][9] As of 11 November 2014, this outbreak has 14,413 reported cases resulting in 5,504 deaths.[10][11]

Contents [hide]
1 Signs and symptoms
2 Cause
2.1 Transmission
2.2 Initial case
2.3 Reservoir
2.4 Virology
3 Pathophysiology
4 Diagnosis
4.1 Nonspecific laboratory testing
4.2 Specific laboratory testing
4.3 Differential diagnosis
5 Prevention
5.1 Infection control
5.2 Putting on and removing protective equipment
5.3 Isolation
5.4 Contact tracing
6 Treatment
6.1 Standard support
6.2 Intensive care
6.3 Alternative medicine
7 Prognosis
8 Epidemiology
8.1 1976
8.2 1995 to 2012
8.3 2013 to 2014 West African outbreak
8.4 2014 DRC Congo outbreak
8.5 2014 spread outside of Africa
9 Society and culture
9.1 Weaponization
9.2 Literature
10 Other animals
10.1 Wild animals
10.2 Domestic animals
10.3 Reston virus
11 Research
11.1 Medications
11.2 Blood products
11.3 Vaccine
12 See also
13 References
14 External links
Signs and symptoms

Signs and symptoms of Ebola[12]
The length of time between exposure to the virus and the development of symptoms of the disease is usually 2 to 21 days.[1][12] Estimates based on mathematical models predict that around 5% of cases may take greater than 21 days to develop.[13]

Symptoms usually begin with a sudden influenza-like stage characterized by feeling tired, fever, pain in the muscles and joints, headache, and sore throat.[1][14][15] The fever is usually higher than 38.3 °C (100.9 °F).[16] This is often followed by vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal pain.[15] Next, shortness of breath and chest pain may occur, along with swelling, headaches and confusion.[15] In about half of the cases, the skin may develop a maculopapular rash (a flat red area covered with small bumps).[16]

In some cases, internal and external bleeding may occur.[1] This typically begins five to seven days after the first symptoms.[17] All infected people show some decreased blood clotting.[16] Bleeding from mucous membranes or from sites of needle punctures has been reported in 40–50 percent of cases.[18] This may result in the vomiting of blood, coughing up of blood or blood in stool.[19] Bleeding into the skin may create petechiae, purpura, ecchymoses or hematomas (especially around needle injection sites).[20] Bleeding into the whites of the eyes may also occur. Heavy bleeding is uncommon, and if it occurs, it is usually located within the gastrointestinal tract.[16][21]

Recovery may begin between 7 and 14 days after the start of symptoms.[15] Death, if it occurs, follows typically 6 to 16 days from the start of symptoms and is often due to low blood pressure from fluid loss.[2] In general, bleeding often indicates a worse outcome, and this blood loss may result in death.[14] People are often in a coma near the end of life.[15] Those who survive often have ongoing muscle and joint pain, liver inflammation, and decreased hearing among other difficulties.[15] Additionally they develop antibodies against Ebola that last at least 10 years but it is unclear if they are immune to repeated infections.[22]

Cause
Main articles: Ebolavirus (taxonomic group) and Ebola virus (specific virus)
EVD in humans is caused by four of five viruses of the genus Ebolavirus. The four are Bundibugyo virus (BDBV), Sudan virus (SUDV), Taï Forest virus (TAFV) and one simply called Ebola virus (EBOV, formerly Zaire Ebola virus).[23] EBOV, species Zaire ebolavirus, is the most dangerous of the known EVD-causing viruses, and is responsible for the largest number of outbreaks.[24] The fifth virus, Reston virus (RESTV), is not thought to cause disease in humans, but has caused disease in other primates.[25][26] All five viruses are closely related to marburgviruses.[23]

Transmission

Life cycles of the Ebolavirus
Between people, Ebola disease spreads only by direct contact with the blood or body fluids of a person who has developed symptoms of the disease.[27][28][29] Body fluids that may contain ebolaviruses include saliva, mucus, vomit, feces, sweat, tears, breast milk, urine and semen.[22] The WHO states that only people who are very sick are able to spread Ebola disease in saliva, and whole virus has not been reported to be transmitted through sweat. Most people spread the virus through blood, feces and vomit.[30] Entry points for the virus include the nose, mouth, eyes, open wounds, cuts and abrasions.[22] Ebola may be spread through large droplets; however, this is believed to occur only when a person is very sick.[31] This can happen if a person is splashed with droplets.[31] Contact with surfaces or objects contaminated by the virus, particularly needles and syringes, may also transmit the infection.[32][33] The virus is able to survive on objects for a few hours in a dried state and can survive for a few days within body fluids.[22]

The Ebola virus may be able to persist for up to 7 weeks in the semen of survivors after they recovered, which could lead to infections via sexual intercourse.[1] Ebola may also occur in the breast milk of women after recovery, and it is not known when it is safe to breastfeed again.[4] Otherwise, people who have recovered are not infectious.[32]

The potential for widespread infections in countries with medical systems capable of observing correct medical isolation procedures is considered low.[34] Usually when someone has symptoms of the disease, they are unable to travel without assistance.[35]

Dead bodies remain infectious; thus, people handling human remains in practices such as traditional burial rituals or more modern processes such as embalming are at risk.[34] 60% of the cases of Ebola infections in Guinea during the 2014 outbreak are believed to have been contracted via unprotected (or unsuitably protected) contact with infected corpses during certain Guinean burial rituals.[36][37]

Health-care workers treating those who are infected are at greatest risk of getting infected themselves.[32] The risk increases when these workers do not have appropriate protective clothing such as masks, gowns, gloves and eye protection; do not wear it properly; or handle contaminated clothing incorrectly.[32] This risk is particularly common in parts of Africa where health systems function poorly and where the disease mostly occurs.[38] Hospital-acquired transmission has also occurred in some African countries resulting from the reuse of needles.[39][40] Some health-care centers caring for people with the disease do not have running water.[41] In the United States the spread to two medial workers treating an infected patients prompted criticism of inadequate training and procedures.[42]

Airborne transmission
Human to human transmission of EBOV through the air has not been reported to occur during EVD outbreaks[3] and airborne transmission has only been demonstrated in very strict laboratory conditions in non-human primates.[27][33] The apparent lack of airborne transmission among humans may be due to levels of the virus in the lungs and other parts of the respiratory system that are insufficient to cause new infections.[43] Spread of EBOV by water or food, other than bushmeat, has also not been observed.[32][33] No spread by mosquitos or other insects has been reported.[32]

A number of studies examining airborne transmission have broadly concluded that transmission from pigs to primates may happen without contact, because unlike humans and primates, pigs with EVD get very high ebolavirus concentrations in their lungs, and not their bloodstream.[44] Therefore pigs with EVD can spread the disease through droplets in the air or on the ground when they sneeze or cough.[45] By contrast, humans and other primates accumulate the virus throughout their body and specifically in their blood, but not very much in their lungs.[45] It is believed that this is the reason researchers have observed pig to primate transmission without physical contact, but no evidence has been found of primates being infected without actual contact, even in experiments where infected and uninfected primates shared the same air.[44][45]

Initial case

Bushmeat being prepared for cooking in Ghana. In Africa, wild animals including fruit bats are hunted for food and are referred to as bushmeat.[46][47] In equatorial Africa, human consumption of bushmeat has been linked to animal-to-human transmission of diseases, including Ebola.[48]
Although it is not entirely clear how Ebola initially spreads from animals to humans, the spread is believed to involve direct contact with an infected wild animal or fruit bat.[32] Besides bats, other wild animals sometimes infected with EBOV include several monkey species, chimpanzees, gorillas, baboons and duikers.[49]

Animals may become infected when they eat fruit partially eaten by bats carrying the virus.[50] Fruit production, animal behavior and other factors may trigger outbreaks among animal populations.[50]

Evidence indicates that both domestic dogs and pigs can also be infected with EBOV.[51] Dogs do not appear to develop symptoms when they carry the virus, and pigs appear to be able to transmit the virus to at least some primates.[51] Although some dogs in an area in which a human outbreak occurred had antibodies to EBOV, it is unclear whether they played a role in spreading the disease to people.[51]




Ebola virus disease (EVD; also Ebola hemorrhagic fever, or EHF), or simply Ebola, is a disease of humans and other primates caused by ebolaviruses. Signs and symptoms typically start between two days and three weeks after contracting the virus as a fever, sore throat, muscle pain, and headaches. Then, vomiting, diarrhea and rash usually follow, along with decreased function of the liver and kidneys. At this time some people begin to bleed both internally and externally.[1] The disease has a high risk of death, killing between 25 percent and 90 percent of those infected with the virus, averaging out at 50 percent.[1] This is often due to low blood pressure from fluid loss, and typically follows six to sixteen days after symptoms appear.[2]

The virus spreads by direct contact with blood or other body fluids of an infected human or other animal.[1] Infection with the virus may also occur by direct contact with a recently contaminated item or surface.[1] Spread of the disease through the air has not been documented in the natural environment.[3] The virus may be spread by semen or breast milk for several weeks to months after recovery.[1][4] Fruit bats are believed to be the normal carrier in nature, able to spread the virus without being affected by it. Humans become infected by contact with the bats or with a living or dead animal that has been infected by bats. After human infection occurs, the disease may also spread between people. Other diseases such as malaria, cholera, typhoid fever, meningitis and other viral hemorrhagic fevers may resemble EVD. Blood samples are tested for viral RNA, viral antibodies or for the virus itself to confirm the diagnosis.[1]

Control of outbreaks requires coordinated medical services, along with a certain level of community engagement. The medical services include: rapid detection of cases of disease, contact tracing of those who have come into contact with infected individuals, quick access to laboratory services, proper care and management of those who are infected and proper disposal of the dead through cremation or burial.[1][5] Prevention includes limiting the spread of disease from infected animals to humans.[1] This may be done by handling potentially infected bush meat only while wearing protective clothing and by thoroughly cooking it before consumption.[1] It also includes wearing proper protective clothing and washing hands when around a person with the disease.[1] Samples of body fluids and tissues from people with the disease should be handled with special caution.[1]

No specific treatment or vaccine for the virus is commercially available. Efforts to help those who are infected are supportive; they include either oral rehydration therapy (drinking slightly sweetened and salty water) or giving intravenous fluids as well as treating symptoms. This supportive care improves outcomes. EVD was first identified in 1976 in an area of Sudan (now part of South Sudan), and in Zaire (now the Democratic Republic of the Congo). The disease typically occurs in outbreaks in tropical regions of sub-Saharan Africa.[1] Through 2013, the World Health Organization reported a total of 1,716 cases in 24 outbreaks.[1][6] The largest outbreak to date is the ongoing epidemic in West Africa, which is centered in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia.[7][8][9] As of 11 November 2014, this outbreak has 14,413 reported cases resulting in 5,504 deaths.[10][11]

Contents [hide]
1 Signs and symptoms
2 Cause
2.1 Transmission
2.2 Initial case
2.3 Reservoir
2.4 Virology
3 Pathophysiology
4 Diagnosis
4.1 Nonspecific laboratory testing
4.2 Specific laboratory testing
4.3 Differential diagnosis
5 Prevention
5.1 Infection control
5.2 Putting on and removing protective equipment
5.3 Isolation
5.4 Contact tracing
6 Treatment
6.1 Standard support
6.2 Intensive care
6.3 Alternative medicine
7 Prognosis
8 Epidemiology
8.1 1976
8.2 1995 to 2012
8.3 2013 to 2014 West African outbreak
8.4 2014 DRC Congo outbreak
8.5 2014 spread outside of Africa
9 Society and culture
9.1 Weaponization
9.2 Literature
10 Other animals
10.1 Wild animals
10.2 Domestic animals
10.3 Reston virus
11 Research
11.1 Medications
11.2 Blood products
11.3 Vaccine
12 See also
13 References
14 External links
Signs and symptoms

Signs and symptoms of Ebola[12]
The length of time between exposure to the virus and the development of symptoms of the disease is usually 2 to 21 days.[1][12] Estimates based on mathematical models predict that around 5% of cases may take greater than 21 days to develop.[13]

Symptoms usually begin with a sudden influenza-like stage characterized by feeling tired, fever, pain in the muscles and joints, headache, and sore throat.[1][14][15] The fever is usually higher than 38.3 °C (100.9 °F).[16] This is often followed by vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal pain.[15] Next, shortness of breath and chest pain may occur, along with swelling, headaches and confusion.[15] In about half of the cases, the skin may develop a maculopapular rash (a flat red area covered with small bumps).[16]

In some cases, internal and external bleeding may occur.[1] This typically begins five to seven days after the first symptoms.[17] All infected people show some decreased blood clotting.[16] Bleeding from mucous membranes or from sites of needle punctures has been reported in 40–50 percent of cases.[18] This may result in the vomiting of blood, coughing up of blood or blood in stool.[19] Bleeding into the skin may create petechiae, purpura, ecchymoses or hematomas (especially around needle injection sites).[20] Bleeding into the whites of the eyes may also occur. Heavy bleeding is uncommon, and if it occurs, it is usually located within the gastrointestinal tract.[16][21]

Recovery may begin between 7 and 14 days after the start of symptoms.[15] Death, if it occurs, follows typically 6 to 16 days from the start of symptoms and is often due to low blood pressure from fluid loss.[2] In general, bleeding often indicates a worse outcome, and this blood loss may result in death.[14] People are often in a coma near the end of life.[15] Those who survive often have ongoing muscle and joint pain, liver inflammation, and decreased hearing among other difficulties.[15] Additionally they develop antibodies against Ebola that last at least 10 years but it is unclear if they are immune to repeated infections.[22]

Cause
Main articles: Ebolavirus (taxonomic group) and Ebola virus (specific virus)
EVD in humans is caused by four of five viruses of the genus Ebolavirus. The four are Bundibugyo virus (BDBV), Sudan virus (SUDV), Taï Forest virus (TAFV) and one simply called Ebola virus (EBOV, formerly Zaire Ebola virus).[23] EBOV, species Zaire ebolavirus, is the most dangerous of the known EVD-causing viruses, and is responsible for the largest number of outbreaks.[24] The fifth virus, Reston virus (RESTV), is not thought to cause disease in humans, but has caused disease in other primates.[25][26] All five viruses are closely related to marburgviruses.[23]

Transmission

Life cycles of the Ebolavirus
Between people, Ebola disease spreads only by direct contact with the blood or body fluids of a person who has developed symptoms of the disease.[27][28][29] Body fluids that may contain ebolaviruses include saliva, mucus, vomit, feces, sweat, tears, breast milk, urine and semen.[22] The WHO states that only people who are very sick are able to spread Ebola disease in saliva, and whole virus has not been reported to be transmitted through sweat. Most people spread the virus through blood, feces and vomit.[30] Entry points for the virus include the nose, mouth, eyes, open wounds, cuts and abrasions.[22] Ebola may be spread through large droplets; however, this is believed to occur only when a person is very sick.[31] This can happen if a person is splashed with droplets.[31] Contact with surfaces or objects contaminated by the virus, particularly needles and syringes, may also transmit the infection.[32][33] The virus is able to survive on objects for a few hours in a dried state and can survive for a few days within body fluids.[22]

The Ebola virus may be able to persist for up to 7 weeks in the semen of survivors after they recovered, which could lead to infections via sexual intercourse.[1] Ebola may also occur in the breast milk of women after recovery, and it is not known when it is safe to breastfeed again.[4] Otherwise, people who have recovered are not infectious.[32]

The potential for widespread infections in countries with medical systems capable of observing correct medical isolation procedures is considered low.[34] Usually when someone has symptoms of the disease, they are unable to travel without assistance.[35]

Dead bodies remain infectious; thus, people handling human remains in practices such as traditional burial rituals or more modern processes such as embalming are at risk.[34] 60% of the cases of Ebola infections in Guinea during the 2014 outbreak are believed to have been contracted via unprotected (or unsuitably protected) contact with infected corpses during certain Guinean burial rituals.[36][37]

Health-care workers treating those who are infected are at greatest risk of getting infected themselves.[32] The risk increases when these workers do not have appropriate protective clothing such as masks, gowns, gloves and eye protection; do not wear it properly; or handle contaminated clothing incorrectly.[32] This risk is particularly common in parts of Africa where health systems function poorly and where the disease mostly occurs.[38] Hospital-acquired transmission has also occurred in some African countries resulting from the reuse of needles.[39][40] Some health-care centers caring for people with the disease do not have running water.[41] In the United States the spread to two medial workers treating an infected patients prompted criticism of inadequate training and procedures.[42]

Airborne transmission
Human to human transmission of EBOV through the air has not been reported to occur during EVD outbreaks[3] and airborne transmission has only been demonstrated in very strict laboratory conditions in non-human primates.[27][33] The apparent lack of airborne transmission among humans may be due to levels of the virus in the lungs and other parts of the respiratory system that are insufficient to cause new infections.[43] Spread of EBOV by water or food, other than bushmeat, has also not been observed.[32][33] No spread by mosquitos or other insects has been reported.[32]

A number of studies examining airborne transmission have broadly concluded that transmission from pigs to primates may happen without contact, because unlike humans and primates, pigs with EVD get very high ebolavirus concentrations in their lungs, and not their bloodstream.[44] Therefore pigs with EVD can spread the disease through droplets in the air or on the ground when they sneeze or cough.[45] By contrast, humans and other primates accumulate the virus throughout their body and specifically in their blood, but not very much in their lungs.[45] It is believed that this is the reason researchers have observed pig to primate transmission without physical contact, but no evidence has been found of primates being infected without actual contact, even in experiments where infected and uninfected primates shared the same air.[44][45]

Initial case

Bushmeat being prepared for cooking in Ghana. In Africa, wild animals including fruit bats are hunted for food and are referred to as bushmeat.[46][47] In equatorial Africa, human consumption of bushmeat has been linked to animal-to-human transmission of diseases, including Ebola.[48]
Although it is not entirely clear how Ebola initially spreads from animals to humans, the spread is believed to involve direct contact with an infected wild animal or fruit bat.[32] Besides bats, other wild animals sometimes infected with EBOV include several monkey species, chimpanzees, gorillas, baboons and duikers.[49]

Animals may become infected when they eat fruit partially eaten by bats carrying the virus.[50] Fruit production, animal behavior and other factors may trigger outbreaks among animal populations.[50]

Evidence indicates that both domestic dogs and pigs can also be infected with EBOV.[51] Dogs do not appear to develop symptoms when they carry the virus, and pigs appear to be able to transmit the virus to at least some primates.[51] Although some dogs in an area in which a human outbreak occurred had antibodies to EBOV, it is unclear whether they played a role in spreading the disease to people.[51]








Catriona Gray for Miss World 2016 !












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Re: WOOO YVETHE SANTIAGO

Postby Thaiboy » Mon Nov 17, 2014 6:25 am

markfrancismahusay wrote: So here we go again, bashing right and left. Starting war again here? Sorry Thai Boy, we will not buy this gimmick. Stop nonsense post!


this thread is in response to a pinoy forumer saying pla's nose is distracting and mongoloid looking. Besides. i never said anything bad bout yvethe. I just posted photos of her, if you perceive it badly, it's not me, it's you ;)
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Re: WOOO YVETHE SANTIAGO

Postby jansenism » Mon Nov 17, 2014 6:35 am

Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant


The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL /ˈaɪsəl/), also translated as the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS /ˈaɪsɪs/; ad-Dawlah al-Islāmīyah fīl-ʻIraq wa ash-Shām), also known by the Arabic acronym Daʿish and self-proclaimed as the Islamic State (IS),[a] is a Sunni, extremist, jihadist group, unrecognized state and self-proclaimed caliphate based in Iraq and Syria in the Middle East.

The group originated as Jama'at al-Tawhid wal-Jihad in 1999 and this group was the forerunner of Tanzim Qaidat al-Jihad fi Bilad al-Rafidayn, commonly known as Al-Qaeda in Iraq (AQI). Following the 2003 invasion of Iraq, AQI took part in the Iraqi insurgency against coalition forces and Iraqi security forces. In 2006, it joined other Sunni insurgent groups to form the Mujahideen Shura Council, which consolidated further into the Islamic State of Iraq (ISI) shortly afterwards. At its height, the ISI gained a significant presence in Al Anbar, Nineveh, Kirkuk and other areas, but around 2008, its violent methods led to a backlash from Sunni Iraqis and other insurgent groups and a temporary decline.[b]

In April 2013, the group changed its name to the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. It grew significantly under the leadership of Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, gaining support in Iraq in the context of perceived economic and political discrimination against Iraqi Sunnis.[citation needed] After entering the Syrian Civil War, it established a large presence in the Syrian governorates of Ar-Raqqah, Idlib, Deir ez-Zor and Aleppo.[29] ISIL had close links to al-Qaeda until February 2014 when, after an eight-month power struggle, al-Qaeda cut all ties with the group, citing its failure to consult and "notorious intransigence".[30]

The group's original aim was to establish an Islamic state in Sunni-majority regions of Iraq. Following its involvement in the Syrian Civil War, this expanded to include controlling Sunni-majority areas of Syria.[31] It proclaimed a worldwide caliphate on 29 June 2014, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi—known by his supporters as Amir al-Mu'minin, Caliph Ibrahim—was named its caliph, and the group was renamed the Islamic State.[6] As caliphate it claims religious authority over all Muslims worldwide, and aims to bring most traditionally Muslim-inhabited regions of the world under its legislative control,[32] beginning with the Levant region, which approximately covers Syria, Jordan, Israel, Palestine, Lebanon, Cyprus, and part of southern Turkey.[33]

The group has been designated as a terrorist organization by the United Nations, the European Union, the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia, Canada, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Indonesia and Israel. The United Nations and Amnesty International have accused the group of grave human rights abuses, and Amnesty International has found it guilty of ethnic cleansing on a "historic scale". The group's actions, authority and theological interpretations have been widely criticized around the world and notably within the Muslim community.

Names

The group has been known by various different names.[15]

The group was founded in 1999 by Abu Musab al-Zarqawi under the name Jamāʻat al-Tawḥīd wa-al-Jihād, "The Organization of Monotheism and Jihad" (JTJ).[13]
In October 2004, al-Zarqawi swore loyalty to Osama bin Laden and changed the name of the group to Tanẓīm Qāʻidat al-Jihād fī Bilād al-Rāfidayn, "The Organization of Jihad's Base in Mesopotamia", or, more commonly, Al-Qaeda in Iraq. (AQI).[15][34] This name has not been used by the group itself.[35]
In January 2006, AQI merged with several other Iraqi insurgent groups to form the Mujahideen Shura Council.[36] Al-Zarqawi was killed in June 2006.
On 12 October 2006, the Mujahideen Shura Council merged with several more insurgent factions, and on 13 October the establishment of the Dawlat al-ʻIraq al-Islāmīyah, Islamic State of Iraq (ISI) was announced.[15][37] Abu Abdullah al-Rashid al-Baghdadi became the ISI's figurehead emir, but the real power lay with the Egyptian Abu Ayyub al-Masri.[38] Both were killed in a US–Iraqi operation in April 2010 and were succeeded by Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the current leader of ISIL.
On 8 April 2013, having expanded into Syria, the group adopted the name Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, also known as Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham.[39][40][41] These names are translations of the Arabic name al-Dawlah al-Islāmīyah fī al-ʻIrāq wa-al-Shām[42][43]—with the final word al-Shām providing a description of the Levant or Greater Syria— sometimes shortened to al-Dawlah ("the State") or al-Dawlah al-Islāmīyah ("the Islamic State").[44] The translated names are commonly abbreviated as ISIL or as ISIS.
The name Daʿish is often used by ISIL's detractors, such as those in Syria. It is based on the Arabic letters dāl, alif, ʻayn, and shīn, which form the acronym (داعش) of ISIL/ISIS's Arabic name al-Dawlah al-Islamīyah fī al-ʻIrāq wa-al-Shām.[45][46] There are many different spellings of this acronym. ISIL reportedly finds the term "Dāʻish" derogatory and reportedly punishes with flogging those who use it in ISIL-controlled areas.[47][48]
On 14 May 2014, the United States Department of State announced its decision to use "Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant" (ISIL) as the group's primary name.[45] The debate over which of these acronyms should be used to designate the group, ISIL or ISIS, has been discussed by several commentators.[43][44] The Washington Post concluded: "In the larger battlefield of copy style controversies, the distinction between ISIS or ISIL is not so great."[44]
On 29 June 2014, the group renamed itself the Islamic State (IS) and declared its government a caliphate.

Foundation of the group (1999–2006)

Following the 2003 US-led invasion of Iraq, the Jordanian Salafi Jihadist Abu Musab al-Zarqawi and his militant group Jama'at al-Tawhid wal-Jihad, founded in 1999, achieved notoriety in the early stages of the Iraq insurgency, by not only carrying out attacks on coalition forces but conducting suicide attacks on civilian targets and beheading hostages.[13][52]

Al-Zarqawi's group grew in strength and attracted more fighters, and in October 2004 it officially pledged allegiance to Osama bin Laden's al-Qaeda network, changing its name to Tanzim Qaidat al-Jihad fi Bilad al-Rafidayn (تنظيم قاعدة الجهاد في بلاد الرافدين, "Organization of Jihad's Base in Mesopotamia"), also known as Al-Qaeda in Iraq (AQI).[26][53][54] Attacks by the group on civilians, the Iraqi Government and security forces continued to increase over the next two years—see list of major resistance attacks in Iraq.[55] In a letter to al-Zarqawi in July 2005, al-Qaeda's deputy leader Ayman al-Zawahiri outlined a four-stage plan to expand the Iraq War, which included expelling US forces from Iraq, establishing an Islamic authority, as caliphate, spreading the conflict to Iraq's secular neighbors, and engaging in the Arab–Israeli conflict.[56]

In January 2006, AQI merged with several smaller Iraqi insurgent groups under an umbrella organization called the Mujahideen Shura Council (MSC). This was claimed by Brian Fishman in the Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science to be little more than a media exercise and an attempt to give the group a more Iraqi flavour and perhaps to distance al-Qaeda from some of al-Zarqawi's tactical errors, notably the 2005 bombings by AQI of three hotels in Amman.[57] On 7 June, al-Zarqawi was killed in a US airstrike and was succeeded as leader of the group by the Egyptian militant Abu Ayyub al-Masri.[58][59]

On 12 October 2006, the Mujahideen Shura Council joined four more insurgent factions and the representatives of a number of Iraqi Arab tribes, and together they swore the traditional Arab oath of allegiance known as Ḥilf al-Muṭayyabīn ("Oath of the Scented Ones").[d][60][61] During the ceremony, the participants swore to free Iraq's Sunnis from what they described as Shia and foreign oppression, and to further the name of Allah and restore Islam to glory.[e][60]

On 13 October 2006, the Mujahideen Shura Council declared the establishment of the Islamic State of Iraq (ISI), comprising Iraq's six mostly Sunni Arab governorates, with Abu Omar al-Baghdadi being announced as its Emir.[37][55] Al-Masri was given the title of Minister of War within the ISI's ten-member cabinet.[62] The declaration of statehood was met with hostile criticism, not only from ISI's jihadist rivals in Iraq, but from leading jihadist ideologues outside the country.

As Islamic State of Iraq (2006–2013)

According to a study compiled by US intelligence agencies in early 2007, the ISI—also known as AQI—planned to seize power in the central and western areas of the country and turn it into a Sunni Islamic state.[64] The group built in strength and at its height enjoyed a significant presence in the Iraqi governorates of Al Anbar, Nineveh, Kirkuk, most of Salah ad Din, parts of Babil, Diyala and Baghdad, and claimed Baqubah as a capital city.[65][66][67][68]

However, by late 2007, violent and indiscriminate attacks directed by rogue AQI elements against Iraqi civilians had severely damaged the group's image and caused a loss of support among the population, thus isolating it. In a major blow to AQI, many former Sunni militants who had previously fought alongside the group started to work with the US armed forces. The US troops surge supplied the military with more manpower for operations targeting the group, resulting in dozens of high-level AQI members being captured or killed.[69]

Al-Qaeda seemed to have lost its foothold in Iraq and appeared to be severely crippled.[70] During 2008, a series of US and Iraqi offensives managed to drive out the AQI-aligned insurgents from their former safe havens, such as the Diyala and Al Anbar governorates and the embattled capital of Baghdad, to the area of the northern city of Mosul, the latest of the Iraq War's major battlegrounds.[71] By 2008, the ISI was describing itself as being in a state of "extraordinary crisis".[72] Its violent attempts to govern its territory led to a backlash from Sunni Iraqis and other insurgent groups and a temporary decline in the group, which was attributable to a number of factors,[73] notably the Anbar Awakening.

In late 2009, the commander of the US forces in Iraq, General Ray Odierno, stated that the ISI "has transformed significantly in the last two years. What once was dominated by foreign individuals has now become more and more dominated by Iraqi citizens".[74] On 18 April 2010, the ISI's two top leaders, Abu Ayyub al-Masri and Abu Omar al-Baghdadi, were killed in a joint US-Iraqi raid near Tikrit.[75] In a press conference in June 2010, General Odierno reported that 80% of the ISI's top 42 leaders, including recruiters and financiers, had been killed or captured, with only eight remaining at large. He said that they had been cut off from al-Qaeda's leadership in Pakistan, and that improved intelligence had enabled the successful mission in April that led to the killing of al-Masri and al-Baghdadi; in addition, the number of attacks and casualty figures in Iraq for the first five months of 2010 were the lowest since 2003.[76][77][78]

On 16 May 2010, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi was appointed the new leader of the Islamic State of Iraq.[79][80] Al-Baghdadi replenished the group's leadership, many of whom had been killed or captured, by appointing former Ba'athist military and intelligence officers who had served during the Saddam Hussein regime. These men, nearly all of whom had spent time imprisoned by the US military, came to make up about one-third of Baghdadi's top 25 commanders. One of them was a former Colonel, Samir al-Khlifawi, also known as Haji Bakr, who became the overall military commander in charge of overseeing the group's operations.[81][82]

In July 2012, al-Baghdadi released an audio statement online announcing that the group was returning to the former strongholds from which US troops and their Sunni allies had driven them prior to the withdrawal of US troops.[83] He also declared the start of a new offensive in Iraq called Breaking the Walls, which was aimed at freeing members of the group held in Iraqi prisons.[83] Violence in Iraq began to escalate that month, and by July 2013 monthly fatalities had exceeded 1,000 for the first time since April 2008.[84] The Breaking the Walls campaign culminated in July 2013, with the group carrying out simultaneous raids on Taji and Abu Ghraib prison, freeing more than 500 prisoners, many of them veterans of the Iraqi insurgency.

As Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (2013–2014)

Declaration and dispute with al-Nusra Front

Pair of armed anti-American insurgents from northern Iraq
In March 2011, protests began in Syria against the government of Bashar al-Assad. In the following months, violence between demonstrators and security forces led to a gradual militarisation of the conflict.[86] In August 2011, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi began sending Syrian and Iraqi ISI members experienced in guerilla warfare across the border into Syria in order to establish an organization inside the country. Led by a Syrian known as Abu Muhammad al-Jawlani, this group began to recruit fighters and establish cells throughout the country.[87][88] On 23 January 2012, the group announced its formation as Jabhat al-Nusra li Ahl as-Sham—Jabhat al-Nusra—more commonly known as al-Nusra Front. Al-Nusra grew rapidly into a capable fighting force with popular support among Syrians opposed to the Assad regime.[87]

On 8 April 2013, al-Baghdadi released an audio statement in which he announced that al-Nusra Front had been established, financed and supported by the Islamic State of Iraq[89] and that the two groups were merging under the name "Islamic State of Iraq and Al-Sham".[39] Al-Jawlani issued a statement denying the merger and complaining that neither he nor anyone else in al-Nusra's leadership had been consulted about it.[90] In June 2013, Al Jazeera reported that it had obtained a letter written by al-Qaeda's leader Ayman al-Zawahiri, addressed to both leaders, in which he ruled against the merger, and appointed an emissary to oversee relations between them to put an end to tensions.[91] In the same month, al-Baghdadi released an audio message rejecting al-Zawahiri's ruling and declaring that the merger was going ahead.[92] In October 2013, al-Zawahiri ordered the disbanding of ISIL, putting al-Nusra Front in charge of jihadist efforts in Syria,[93] but al-Baghdadi contested al-Zawahiri's ruling on the basis of Islamic jurisprudence,[92] and his group continued to operate in Syria. In February 2014, after an eight-month power struggle, al-Qaeda disavowed any relations with ISIL.[30]

According to journalist Sarah Birke, there are "significant differences" between al-Nusra Front and ISIL. While al-Nusra actively calls for the overthrow of the Assad government, ISIL "tends to be more focused on establishing its own rule on conquered territory". ISIL is "far more ruthless" in building an Islamic state, "carrying out sectarian attacks and imposing sharia law immediately". While al-Nusra has a "large contingent of foreign fighters", it is seen as a home-grown group by many Syrians; by contrast, ISIL fighters have been described as "foreign 'occupiers'" by many Syrian refugees.[94] It has a strong presence in central and northern Syria, where it has instituted sharia in a number of towns.[94] The group reportedly controlled the four border towns of Atmeh, al-Bab, Azaz and Jarablus, allowing it to control the entrance and exit from Syria into Turkey.[94] Foreign fighters in Syria include Russian-speaking jihadists who were part of Jaish al-Muhajireen wal-Ansar (JMA).[95] In November 2013, the JMA's Chechen leader Abu Omar al-Shishani swore an oath of allegiance to al-Baghdadi;[96] the group then split between those who followed al-Shishani in joining ISIL and those who continued to operate independently in the JMA under new leadership.[97]

In May 2014, Ayman al-Zawahiri ordered al-Nusra Front to stop attacks on its rival ISIL.[98] In June 2014, after continued fighting between the two groups, al-Nusra's branch in the Syrian town of Al-Bukamal pledged allegiance to ISIL.[99][100]

In mid-June 2014, ISIL captured the Trabil crossing on the Jordan–Iraq border,[101] the only border crossing between the two countries.[102] ISIL has received some public support in Jordan, albeit limited, partly owing to state repression there,[103] but has undertaken a recruitment drive in Saudi Arabia,[104] where tribes in the north are linked to those in western Iraq and eastern Syria.

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Sana, birthday candle ka na lang -- habang pinapatay kita, nagpapalakpakan sila.
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Re: WOOO YVETHE SANTIAGO

Postby goddessoxana27 » Mon Nov 17, 2014 6:40 am

Thaiboy wrote:
markfrancismahusay wrote: So here we go again, bashing right and left. Starting war again here? Sorry Thai Boy, we will not buy this gimmick. Stop nonsense post!


this thread is in response to a pinoy forumer saying pla's nose is distracting and mongoloid looking. Besides. i never said anything bad bout yvethe. I just posted photos of her, if you perceive it badly, it's not me, it's you ;)


Chimpanzee
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"Panina" redirects here. For the Russian surname Panina, see Panin.
For the film of the same name, see Chimpanzee (film).
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Chimpanzees[1]
Temporal range: 4–0Ma
PreЄЄOSDCPTJKPgN

Schimpanse Zoo Leipzig.jpg
Common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Primates
Family: Hominidae
Subfamily: Homininae
Tribe: Panini
Genus: Pan
Oken, 1816
Type species
Pan troglodytes
Blumenbach, 1775
Species
Pan troglodytes
Pan paniscus
Pan.png
Distribution of Pan troglodytes (common chimpanzee) and Pan paniscus (bonobo, in red)
Synonyms
Troglodytes E. Geoffroy, 1812 (preoccupied)
Mimetes Leach, 1820 (preoccupied)
Theranthropus Brookes, 1828
Chimpansee Voight, 1831
Anthropopithecus Blainville, 1838
Hylanthropus Gloger, 1841
Pseudanthropus Reichenbach, 1862
Engeco Haeckel, 1866
Fsihego DePauw, 1905
Chimpanzees, sometimes colloquially chimps, are two extant hominid species of apes in the genus Pan. The Congo River divides the native habitats of the two species:[2]
Common chimpanzee, Pan troglodytes (West and Central Africa)
Bonobo, Pan paniscus (forests of the Democratic Republic of the Congo)
Chimpanzees are members of the family Hominidae, along with gorillas, humans, and orangutans. Chimpanzees split from the human branch of the family about four to six million years ago. Chimpanzees are the closest living relatives to humans, being members of the tribe Hominini (along with extinct species of subtribe Hominina). Chimpanzees are the only known members of the subtribe Panina. The two Pan species split only about one million years ago.
Contents [hide]
1 Evolutionary history
1.1 Evolutionary relationship
1.2 Fossils
2 Anatomy and physiology
3 Behavior
3.1 Social structure
3.2 Intelligence
3.3 Tool use
3.4 Nest-building
3.5 Altruism and emotivity
3.6 Communication
3.7 Aggression
3.8 Hunting
3.9 Puzzle solving
4 Interactions with humans
4.1 History
4.2 Animal research
4.2.1 Studies of language
4.2.2 Memory
4.2.3 Laughter in apes
5 In popular culture
5.1 Portrayals in science fiction
6 See also
7 Notes
8 References
9 Further reading
10 External links
Evolutionary history
Evolutionary relationship
Further information: History of hominoid taxonomy
The genus Pan is part of the subfamily Homininae, to which humans also belong. These two species are the closest living evolutionary relatives to humans, sharing a common ancestor with humans about four to six million years ago.[3] Research by Mary-Claire King in 1973 found 99% identical DNA between human beings and chimpanzees,[4] although research since has modified that finding to about 94%[5] commonality, with some of the difference occurring in noncoding DNA. P. troglodytes and P. paniscus have been proposed to belong with H. sapiens in the genus Homo, rather than in Pan; e.g., by J. Diamond in his book, wherein he refers to man as The Third Chimpanzee. Among the arguments in favor of this reclassification is that other species have been reclassified to belong to the same genus because of less genetic similarity than that between humans and chimpanzees.
Taxonomy of genus Pan[1] Phylogeny of superfamily Hominoidea[6](Fig. 4)
Genus Pan
Common chimpanzee (P. troglodytes)
Central chimpanzee (P. t. troglodytes)
Western chimpanzee (P. t. verus)
Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzee (P. t. ellioti)
Eastern chimpanzee (P. t. schweinfurthii)
Bonobo (P. paniscus)
Hominoidea




humans (genus Homo)


chimpanzees (genus Pan)



gorillas (genus Gorilla)



orangutans (genus Pongo)



gibbons (family Hylobatidae)


Fossils
Though many human fossils have been found, chimpanzee fossils were not described until 2005. Existing chimpanzee populations in West and Central Africa are separate from the major human fossil sites in East Africa; however, chimpanzee fossils have been reported from Kenya, indicating that both humans and members of the Pan clade were present in the East African Rift Valley during the Middle Pleistocene.[7]
File:Pan troglodytes-female-TobuZoo2012.ogv
Play media
(video) Female Chimpanzee at Tobu Zoo in Saitama. Japan
Anatomy and physiology

Human and chimp skulls and brains (not to scale), as illustrated in Gervais' Histoire naturelle des mammifères

The chimpanzee's brain on the left and the man's brain on the right have been scaled to the same size to show the relative proportions of their parts. These drawings were in a book made in 1904 by Thomas Henry Huxley.[8]
The male common chimp stands up to 1.7 m (5.6 ft) high and weighs as much as 70 kg (150 lb); the female is somewhat smaller. The common chimp’s long arms, when extended, span one and a half times the body’s height. A chimpanzee's arms are longer than its legs.[9] The bonobo is slightly shorter and thinner than the common chimpanzee but has longer limbs. In trees, both species climb with their long, powerful arms; on the ground, chimpanzees usually knuckle-walk, or walk on all fours, clenching their fists and supporting themselves on the knuckles thereof. Chimpanzee feet are better suited for walking than are those of the orangutan because the chimp has broader soles and shorter toes.
Both the common chimpanzee and bonobo can walk upright on two legs when carrying objects with their hands and arms. The bonobo has proportionately longer upper limbs and more often walks upright than does the common chimpanzee. The coat is dark; the face, fingers, palms of the hands, and soles of the feet, hairless; the chimp, tailless. The exposed skin of the face, hands and feet varies from pink to very dark in both species but is generally lighter in younger individuals, darkening as maturity is reached. A University of Chicago Medical Centre study has found significant genetic differences between chimpanzee populations.[10] A bony shelf over the eyes gives the forehead a receding appearance, and the nose is flat. Although the jaws protrude, the lips are thrust out only when a chimp pouts.
The brain of a chimpanzee has been measured at ~337 cc,[11][12] ~393 cc,[13] with a general range of 282–500 cc.[14] Human brains, in contrast, have been measured as being three times larger, variously reported volumes include ~1,299 cc,[11][12] ~1,158 cc,[13] and averages of ~1330 cc.[15][16][17][18][19][20][21][22]
Chimpanzee testicles are unusually large for their body size, with a combined weight of about 4 oz (110 g) compared to a gorilla's 1 oz (28 g) or a human's 1.5 ounces (43 g). This relatively great size is generally attributed to sperm competition due to the polyandrous nature of chimpanzee mating behavior.[23] Chimpanzees reach puberty at an age of between eight and 10 years and rarely live past age 40 in the wild, but some have lived longer than 60 years in captivity.
Behavior

Bonobo
Anatomical differences between the common chimpanzee and the bonobo are slight, but sexual and social behaviors are markedly different. The common chimpanzee has an omnivorous diet, a troop hunting culture based on beta males led by an alpha male, and highly complex social relationships. The bonobo, on the other hand, has a mostly frugivorous diet and an egalitarian, nonviolent, matriarchal, sexually receptive behavior.[24] Bonobos frequently have sex, sometimes to help prevent and resolve conflicts. Different groups of chimpanzees also have different cultural behavior with preferences for types of tools.[25] The common chimpanzee tends to display greater aggression than does the bonobo.[26] The average, captive chimpanzee sleeps 9.7 hours per day.[27]
Social structure
Question book-new.svg
This section does not cite any references or sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (August 2013)
Chimpanzees live in large multi-male and multi-female social groups, which are called communities. Within a community, the position of an individual and the influence the individual has on others dictates a definite social hierarchy. Chimpanzees live in a leaner hierarchy wherein more than one individual may be dominant enough to dominate other members of lower rank. Typically, a dominant male is referred to as the alpha male. The alpha male is the highest-ranking male that controls the group and maintains order during disputes. In chimpanzee society, the 'dominant male' sometimes is not the largest or strongest male but rather the most manipulative and political male that can influence the goings on within a group. Male chimpanzees typically attain dominance by cultivating allies who will support that individual during future ambitions for power. The alpha male regularly displays by puffing his normally slim coat up to increase view size and charge to seem as threatening and as powerful as possible; this behavior serves to intimidate other members and thereby maintain power and authority, and it may be fundamental to the alpha male's holding on to his status. Lower-ranking chimpanzees will show respect by submissively gesturing in body language or reaching out their hands while grunting. Female chimpanzees will show deference to the alpha male by presenting their hindquarters.
Female chimpanzees also have a hierarchy, which is influenced by the position of a female individual within a group. In some chimpanzee communities, the young females may inherit high status from a high-ranking mother. Dominant females will also ally to dominate lower-ranking females: whereas males mainly seek dominant status for its associated mating privileges and sometimes violent domination of subordinates, females seek dominant status to acquire such resources as food. High-ranking females often have first access. Both genders acquire dominant status to improve social standing within a group.
Community female acceptance is necessary for alpha male status; females must ensure that their group visits places that supply them with enough food. A group of dominant females will sometimes oust an alpha male which is not to their preference and back another male, in whom they see potential for leading the group as a successful alpha male.
Intelligence
Further information: Primate cognition

Diagram of brain – topography of the main groups of foci in the motor field of chimpanzee
Chimpanzees make tools and use them to acquire foods and for social displays; they have sophisticated hunting strategies requiring cooperation, influence and rank; they are status conscious, manipulative and capable of deception; they can learn to use symbols and understand aspects of human language including some relational syntax, concepts of number and numerical sequence;[28] and they are capable of spontaneous planning for a future state or event.[29]
Tool use
In October 1960, Jane Goodall observed the use of tools among chimpanzees. Recent research indicates chimpanzee stone tool use dates to at least 4,300 years ago.[30] Chimpanzee tool usage includes digging into termite mounds with a large stick tool, and then using a small stick that has been altered to "fish" the termites out.[31] There have been occasional unsubstantiated or controversial reports of Chimpanzees using rocks or sticks as weapons.[32] A recent study claimed to reveal the use of spears, which common chimpanzees in Senegal sharpen with their teeth and use to stab and pry Senegal bushbabies out of small holes in trees.[33][34] Chimpanzees are also known to use stones as anvils and hammers in order to break open nuts.[35] Before the discovery of tool use in chimps, humans were believed to be the only species to make and use tools, but several other tool-using species are now known.[36][37]
Nest-building
Nest-building, sometimes considered as tool use, is seen in chimpanzees which construct arboreal night nests by lacing together branches from one or more trees. It forms an important part of behavior, especially in the case of mothers who teach this trait to infants. Nests consist of a mattress, supported on a strong foundation, and lined above with soft leaves and twigs, and are built in trees with a minimum diameter of 5 metres (16 ft) and may be located at a height of 3 to 45 metres (9.8 to 147.6 ft). Both day and night nests are built; they may be located in groups.[38] A study in 2014 found that the Muhimbi tree is favoured for nest building by chimpanzees in Uganda due to its physical properties, such as bending strength, inter-node distance, and leaf surface area.[39]
Altruism and emotivity

Chimpanzee mother and baby
Studies have shown chimpanzees engage in apparently altruistic behavior within groups.[40][41] Some researchers have said chimpanzees are indifferent to the welfare of unrelated group members,[42] but a more recent study of wild chimpanzees found that both male and female adults would adopt orphaned young of their group. Also, different groups sometimes share food, form coalitions, and cooperate in hunting and border patrolling.[43] Sometimes chimpanzees have adopted young that come from unrelated groups. And in some rare cases, even male chimps have been shown to take care of abandoned infant chimps of an unrelated group, though in most cases they would kill the infant.[citation needed]
According to James W. Harrod, evidence for chimpanzee emotivity includes display of mourning, "incipient romantic love", rain dances, appreciation of natural beauty such as a sunset over a lake, curiosity and respect towards wildlife (such as the python, which is neither a threat nor a food source to chimpanzees), altruism toward other species (such as feeding turtles) and animism, or "pretend play", in chimps cradling and grooming rocks or sticks.[44]
Communication
Chimps communicate in a manner similar to human nonverbal communication, using vocalizations, hand gestures, and facial expressions. Research into the chimpanzee brain has revealed chimp communication activates an area of the chimp brain in the same position as Broca's area, a language center in the human brain.[45]
There is some debate as to whether chimpanzees have the ability to express hierarchical ideas in language. Studies have found that chimps are capable of learning a limited set of sign language symbols, which they can use to communicate with human trainers. However, it is clear that there are distinct limits to the complexity of knowledge structures with which chimps are capable of dealing. The sentences that they can express are limited to specific simple noun-verb sequences and are not capable of the indefinite expansion of complexity characteristic of humans.
Aggression
Adult common chimpanzees, particularly males, can be very aggressive. They are highly territorial and are known to kill other chimps.[46]
Hunting
Chimpanzees also engage in targeted hunting of lower-order primates such as the red colobus[47] and bush babies,[48][49] and use the meat from these kills as a "social tool" within their community.[50]
Puzzle solving
In February 2013, a study found chimpanzees solve puzzles for entertainment.[51]
Interactions with humans
History
62-year-old chimpanzee
Gregoire: 62-year-old chimpanzee
Africans have had contact with chimpanzees for millennia. Chimpanzees have been kept as pets for centuries in a few African villages, especially in the Democratic Republic of Congo. In Virunga National Park in the east of the country, the park authorities regularly confiscate chimpanzees from people keeping them as pets.[52] The first recorded contact of Europeans with chimps took place in present-day Angola during the 17th century. The diary of Portuguese explorer Duarte Pacheco Pereira (1506), preserved in the Portuguese National Archive (Torre do Tombo), is probably the first European document to acknowledge chimpanzees built their own rudimentary tools.
The first use of the name "chimpanzee", however, did not occur until 1738. The name is derived from a Tshiluba language term kivili-chimpenze, which is the local name for the animal and translates loosely as "mockman" or possibly just "ape". The colloquialism "chimp" was most likely coined some time in the late 1870s.[53] Biologists applied Pan as the genus name of the animal. Chimps, as well as other apes, had also been purported to have been known to Western writers in ancient times, but mainly as myths and legends on the edge of European and Arab societal consciousness, mainly through fragmented and sketchy accounts of European adventurers. Apes are mentioned variously by Aristotle, as well as the English Bible, where they are described as having been collected by Solomon. (1 Kings 10:22. However the Hebrew word, qőf, may mean a monkey.) Apes are mentioned in the Qur'an (7:166), where God tells Israelites who transgressed Shabbat "Be ye apes". The first of these early transcontinental chimpanzees came from Angola and were presented as a gift to Frederick Henry, Prince of Orange in 1640, and were followed by a few of its brethren over the next several years. Scientists described these first chimpanzees as "pygmies", and noted the animals' distinct similarities to humans. The next two decades, a number of the creatures were imported into Europe, mainly acquired by various zoological gardens as entertainment for visitors.

Hugo Rheinhold's Affe mit Schädel ("Ape with skull") is an example of how chimps were viewed at the end of the 19th century.
Darwin's theory of natural selection (published in 1859) spurred scientific interest in chimpanzees, as in much of life science, leading eventually to numerous studies of the animals in the wild and captivity. The observers of chimpanzees at the time were mainly interested in behavior as it related to that of humans. This was less strictly and disinterestedly scientific than it might sound, with much attention being focused on whether or not the animals had traits that could be considered 'good'; the intelligence of chimpanzees was often significantly exaggerated, as immortalized in Hugo Rheinhold's Affe mit Schädel (see image, left). By the end of the 19th century, chimpanzees remained very much a mystery to humans, with very little factual scientific information available.
In the 20th century, a new age of scientific research into chimpanzee behavior began. Before 1960, almost nothing was known about chimpanzee behavior in their natural habitats. In July of that year, Jane Goodall set out to Tanzania's Gombe forest to live among the chimpanzees, where she primarily studied the members of the Kasakela chimpanzee community. Her discovery that chimpanzees made and used tools was groundbreaking, as humans were previously believed to be the only species to do so. The most progressive early studies on chimpanzees were spearheaded primarily by Wolfgang Köhler and Robert Yerkes, both of whom were renowned psychologists. Both men and their colleagues established laboratory studies of chimpanzees focused specifically on learning about the intellectual abilities of chimpanzees, particularly problem-solving. This typically involved basic, practical tests on laboratory chimpanzees, which required a fairly high intellectual capacity (such as how to solve the problem of acquiring an out-of-reach banana). Notably, Yerkes also made extensive observations of chimpanzees in the wild which added tremendously to the scientific understanding of chimpanzees and their behavior. Yerkes studied chimpanzees until World War II, while Köhler concluded five years of study and published his famous Mentality of Apes in 1925 (which is coincidentally when Yerkes began his analyses), eventually concluding, "chimpanzees manifest intelligent behaviour of the general kind familiar in human beings ... a type of behaviour which counts as specifically human" (1925).[54]

Chimpanzee at the Los Angeles Zoo
The August 2008 issue of the American Journal of Primatology reported results of a year-long study of chimpanzees in Tanzania’s Mahale Mountains National Park, which produced evidence of chimpanzees becoming sick from viral infectious diseases they have likely contracted from humans. Molecular, microscopic and epidemiological investigations demonstrated the chimpanzees living at Mahale Mountains National Park have been suffering from a respiratory disease that is likely caused by a variant of a human paramyxovirus.[55]
Animal research
See also: Animal testing on non-human primates § Chimpanzees in the U.S.
As of November 2007, about 1,300 chimpanzees were housed in 10 U.S. laboratories (out of 3,000 great apes living in captivity there), either wild-caught, or acquired from circuses, animal trainers, or zoos.[56] Most of the labs either conduct or make the chimps available for invasive research,[57] defined as "inoculation with an infectious agent, surgery or biopsy conducted for the sake of research and not for the sake of the chimpanzee, and/or drug testing".[58] Two federally funded laboratories use chimps: the Yerkes National Primate Research Center at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, and the Southwest National Primate Center in San Antonio, Texas.[59] Five hundred chimps have been retired from laboratory use in the U.S. and live in animal sanctuaries in the U.S. or Canada.[57]

Ham the Astrochimp before being inserted into the Mercury-Redstone 2 capsule in 1961
Chimpanzees used in biomedical research tend to be used repeatedly over decades, rather than used and killed as with most laboratory animals. Some individual chimps currently in U.S. laboratories have been used in experiments for over 40 years.[60] According to Project R&R, a campaign to release chimps held in U.S. labs—run by the New England Anti-Vivisection Society in conjunction with Jane Goodall and other primate researchers—the oldest known chimp in a U.S. lab is Wenka, which was born in a laboratory in Florida on May 21, 1954.[61] She was removed from her mother on the day of birth to be used in a vision experiment that lasted 17 months, then sold as a pet to a family in North Carolina. She was returned to the Yerkes National Primate Research Center in 1957 when she became too big to handle. Since then, she has given birth six times, and has been the subject of research into alcohol use, oral contraceptives, aging, and cognitive studies.[62]
With the publication of the chimpanzee genome, plans to increase the use of chimps in labs are reportedly increasing, with some scientists arguing the federal moratorium on breeding chimps for research should be lifted.[59][63] A five-year moratorium was imposed by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in 1996, because too many chimps had been bred for HIV research, and it has been extended annually since 2001.[59]
Other researchers argue chimps are unique animals and either should not be used in research, or should be treated differently. Pascal Gagneux, an evolutionary biologist and primate expert at the University of California, San Diego, argues, given chimpanzees' sense of self, tool use, and genetic similarity to human beings, studies using chimps should follow the ethical guidelines used for human subjects unable to give consent.[59] Also, a recent study suggests chimpanzees which are retired from labs exhibit a form of posttraumatic stress disorder.[64] Stuart Zola, director of the Yerkes National Primate Research Laboratory, disagrees. He told National Geographic: "I don't think we should make a distinction between our obligation to treat humanely any species, whether it's a rat or a monkey or a chimpanzee. No matter how much we may wish it, chimps are not human."[59]
An increasing number of governments are enacting a great ape research ban forbidding the use of chimpanzees and other great apes in research or toxicology testing.[65] As of 2006, Austria, New Zealand, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the UK had introduced such bans.[66]
Studies of language
Main article: Great ape language

Side profile of a chimpanzee
Scientists have long been fascinated with the studies of language, believing it to be a unique human cognitive ability. To test this hypothesis, scientists have attempted to teach human language to several species of great apes. One early attempt by Allen and Beatrix Gardner in the 1960s involved spending 51 months teaching American Sign Language (ASL) to a chimpanzee named Washoe. The Gardners reported Washoe learned 151 signs, and she had spontaneously taught them to other chimpanzees.[67] Over a longer period of time, Washoe learned over 800 signs.[68]
Debate is ongoing among some scientists (such as David Premack), about nonhuman great apes' ability to learn language. Since the early reports on Washoe, numerous other studies have been conducted, with varying levels of success,[69] including one involving a chimpanzee named, in parody, Nim Chimpsky, trained by Herbert Terrace of Columbia University. Although his initial reports were quite positive, in November 1979, Terrace and his team (including psycholinguist Thomas Bever) re-evaluated the videotapes of Nim with his trainers, analyzing them frame by frame for signs, as well as for exact context (what was happening both before and after Nim’s signs). In the reanalysis, Terrace and Bever concluded Nim's utterances could be explained merely as prompting on the part of the experimenters, as well as mistakes in reporting the data. "Much of the apes’ behavior is pure drill," he said. "Language still stands as an important definition of the human species." In this reversal, Terrace now argued Nim's use of ASL was not like human language acquisition. Nim never initiated conversations himself, rarely introduced new words, and simply imitated what the humans did. More importantly, Nim's word strings varied in their ordering, suggesting that he was incapable of syntax. Nim’s sentences also did not grow in length, unlike human children whose vocabulary and sentence length show a strong positive correlation.[70]
Memory
A 30-year study at Kyoto University’s Primate Research Institute has shown chimps are able to learn to recognize the numbers 1 through 9 and their values. The chimps further show an aptitude for photographic memory, demonstrated in experiments in which the jumbled digits are flashed onto a computer screen for less than a quarter of a second, after which the chimp, Ayumu, is able to correctly and quickly point to the positions where they appeared in ascending order. The same experiment was failed by human world memory champion Ben Pridmore on most attempts.[71]
Laughter in apes
Young chimpanzees
Young chimpanzees playing
Laughter might not be confined or unique to humans. The differences between chimpanzee and human laughter may be the result of adaptations that have evolved to enable human speech. Self-awareness of one's situation as seen in the mirror test, or the ability to identify with another's predicament (see mirror neurons), are prerequisites for laughter,[citation needed] so animals may be laughing in the same way as humans do.
Chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans show laughter-like vocalizations in response to physical contact, such as wrestling, play-chasing, or tickling. This is documented in wild and captive chimpanzees. Common chimpanzee laughter is not readily recognizable to humans as such, because it is generated by alternating inhalations and exhalations that sound more like breathing and panting. Instances in which nonhuman primates have expressed joy have been reported. One study analyzed and recorded sounds made by human babies and bonobos when tickled. Although the bonobo's laugh was a higher frequency, the laugh followed a pattern similar to that of human babies and included similar facial expressions. Humans and chimpanzees share similar ticklish areas of the body, such as the armpits and belly. The enjoyment of tickling in chimpanzees does not diminish with age.[72]
See also: Laughter in animals
In popular culture
See also: List of fictional primates
Chimpanzees have been commonly stereotyped in popular culture, where they are most often cast in standardized roles as childlike companions, sidekicks or clowns.[73] They are especially suited for the latter role on account of their prominent facial features, long limbs and fast movements, which humans often find amusing. Accordingly, entertainment acts featuring chimpanzees dressed up as humans have been traditional staples of circuses and stage shows.[73]
In the age of television, a new genre of chimp act emerged in the United States: series whose cast consisted entirely of chimpanzees dressed as humans and "speaking" lines dubbed by human actors.[73] These shows, examples of which include Lancelot Link, Secret Chimp in the 1970s or The Chimp Channel in the 1990s, relied on the novelty of their ape cast to make their timeworn, low comedy gags funny.[73] Their chimpanzee "actors" were as interchangeable as the apes in a circus act, being amusing as chimpanzees and not as individuals.[73] Animal rights groups have urged a stop to this practice, considering it animal abuse.[74]
When chimpanzees appear in other TV shows, they generally do so as comic relief sidekicks to humans. In that role, for instance, J. Fred Muggs appeared with Today Show host Dave Garroway in the 1950s, Judy on Daktari in the 1960s or Darwin on The Wild Thornberrys in the 1990s.[73] In contrast to the fictional depictions of other animals, such as dogs (as in Lassie), dolphins (Flipper), horses (The Black Stallion) or even other great apes (King Kong), chimpanzee characters and actions are rarely relevant to the plot.[73]
Portrayals in science fiction
The rare depictions of chimpanzees as individuals rather than stock characters, and as central rather than incidental to the plot[73] are generally found in works of science fiction. Robert A. Heinlein's short story "Jerry Was a Man" (1947) centers on a genetically enhanced chimpanzee suing for better treatment. The 1972 film Conquest of the Planet of the Apes, the third sequel of Planet of the Apes, portrays a futuristic revolt of enslaved apes led by the only talking chimpanzee, Caesar, against their human masters.[73] This concept was revisited in the 2011 film Rise of the Planet of the Apes, again with a chimpanzee protagonist named Caesar. Another short story, "The Pope of the Chimps" by Robert Silverberg, set in the present day, shows the development of the first signs of religiosity in a group of chimpanzees, much to the surprise of the humans observing them. David Brin's Uplift novels present a future in which humans have "uplifted" chimpanzees (and certain other species) with human-level sapience.
See also
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Notes
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References
Pickrell, John. (September 24, 2002). "Humans, Chimps Not as Closely Related as Thought?". National Geographic.
Further reading
Hawks, John. "How Strong Is a Chimpanzee?" Slate, February 25, 2009.
External links
Wikiquote has quotations related to: Chimpanzee
Wikispecies has information related to: Chimpanzee
Media related to Pan at Wikimedia Commons
Wikisource-logo.svg Ernest Ingersoll (1920). "Chimpanzee". Encyclopedia Americana.
Stanford, Craig B. The Predatory Behavior and Ecology of Wild Chimpanzees university of Southern California. 2002(?)
ChimpCARE.org
View the panTro4 genome assembly in the UCSC Genome Browser.
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Re: WOOO YVETHE SANTIAGO

Postby Vladrak » Mon Nov 17, 2014 6:43 am

That is a MAJOR MAJOR nose job and MAJOR MAJOR improvement, Good on her.
If Venezuela can make their queens under go tons of plastic surgery then why cant Santiago have a nose job??
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Re: WOOO YVETHE SANTIAGO

Postby ccccc » Mon Nov 17, 2014 6:58 am

I DID NOT WANT TO CAPITALIZE OR GIVE THE TS THE GLORY THAT HE WANTS BY RESPONDING --- BUT SORRY, I COULDN'T RESIST BECAUSE ITS A FILIPINO THE TS IS BESMIRCHING--- AYOKO SANANG PATULAN PERO....

TO THE T.S. --

YOU HAVE THE NERVE TO TARNISH YVETHE'S PERSONALITY BY SHOWING HER NOT SO GOOD PHOTOS BUT ------
DID YOU KNOW THAT YOUR BET TO 2014 SUPRANATIONAL LOOKS LIKE MICKEY MOUSE?
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Re: WOOO YVETHE SANTIAGO

Postby essejlloyd » Mon Nov 17, 2014 7:03 am

so what's your problem thai boy? i mean, what's new with the bash?

you always prove that you are nothing but a bitter gourd.

I knew you were threatened L-) L-) L-) L-) L-) L-) L-) L-) L-) L-) L-) L-)
Maria Venus Raj, 22, Philippines!!!
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Re: WOOO YVETHE SANTIAGO

Postby kurtij » Mon Nov 17, 2014 7:17 am

im sure you know how ugly Miss Thailand is too
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Re: WOOO YVETHE SANTIAGO

Postby hauteegirl » Mon Nov 17, 2014 7:17 am

Thaiboy wrote:
markfrancismahusay wrote: So here we go again, bashing right and left. Starting war again here? Sorry Thai Boy, we will not buy this gimmick. Stop nonsense post!


this thread is in response to a pinoy forumer saying pla's nose is distracting and mongoloid looking. Besides. i never said anything bad bout yvethe. I just posted photos of her, if you perceive it badly, it's not me, it's you ;)




SO FUCKING WHAT? YOU'RE CROSSEYED YOURSELF!!!! CAN'T YOU SEE YOURSELF IN THE MIRROR? 8-}
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Re: WOOO YVETHE SANTIAGO

Postby hauteegirl » Mon Nov 17, 2014 7:36 am

THESE ARE THAIBOY'S EYES
Image
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Re: WOOO YVETHE SANTIAGO

Postby goddessoxana27 » Mon Nov 17, 2014 7:51 am

Thaiboy wrote:Image
Image
Image
Image
Image



What can you say about this STUPID GAY!!!!

http://missosology.info/~missyorg/forum/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=517815
CREDITS TO THE OWNER OF THE POSTED ARTICLES, VIDEOS, AND PICTURES...

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Re: WOOO YVETHE SANTIAGO

Postby SINCHAN SHOE » Mon Nov 17, 2014 7:55 am

goddessoxana27 wrote:
Thaiboy wrote:
markfrancismahusay wrote: So here we go again, bashing right and left. Starting war again here? Sorry Thai Boy, we will not buy this gimmick. Stop nonsense post!


this thread is in response to a pinoy forumer saying pla's nose is distracting and mongoloid looking. Besides. i never said anything bad bout yvethe. I just posted photos of her, if you perceive it badly, it's not me, it's you ;)


Chimpanzee
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"Panina" redirects here. For the Russian surname Panina, see Panin.
For the film of the same name, see Chimpanzee (film).
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Chimpanzees[1]
Temporal range: 4–0Ma
PreЄЄOSDCPTJKPgN

Schimpanse Zoo Leipzig.jpg
Common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Primates
Family: Hominidae
Subfamily: Homininae
Tribe: Panini
Genus: Pan
Oken, 1816
Type species
Pan troglodytes
Blumenbach, 1775
Species
Pan troglodytes
Pan paniscus
Pan.png
Distribution of Pan troglodytes (common chimpanzee) and Pan paniscus (bonobo, in red)
Synonyms
Troglodytes E. Geoffroy, 1812 (preoccupied)
Mimetes Leach, 1820 (preoccupied)
Theranthropus Brookes, 1828
Chimpansee Voight, 1831
Anthropopithecus Blainville, 1838
Hylanthropus Gloger, 1841
Pseudanthropus Reichenbach, 1862
Engeco Haeckel, 1866
Fsihego DePauw, 1905
Chimpanzees, sometimes colloquially chimps, are two extant hominid species of apes in the genus Pan. The Congo River divides the native habitats of the two species:[2]
Common chimpanzee, Pan troglodytes (West and Central Africa)
Bonobo, Pan paniscus (forests of the Democratic Republic of the Congo)
Chimpanzees are members of the family Hominidae, along with gorillas, humans, and orangutans. Chimpanzees split from the human branch of the family about four to six million years ago. Chimpanzees are the closest living relatives to humans, being members of the tribe Hominini (along with extinct species of subtribe Hominina). Chimpanzees are the only known members of the subtribe Panina. The two Pan species split only about one million years ago.
Contents [hide]
1 Evolutionary history
1.1 Evolutionary relationship
1.2 Fossils
2 Anatomy and physiology
3 Behavior
3.1 Social structure
3.2 Intelligence
3.3 Tool use
3.4 Nest-building
3.5 Altruism and emotivity
3.6 Communication
3.7 Aggression
3.8 Hunting
3.9 Puzzle solving
4 Interactions with humans
4.1 History
4.2 Animal research
4.2.1 Studies of language
4.2.2 Memory
4.2.3 Laughter in apes
5 In popular culture
5.1 Portrayals in science fiction
6 See also
7 Notes
8 References
9 Further reading
10 External links
Evolutionary history
Evolutionary relationship
Further information: History of hominoid taxonomy
The genus Pan is part of the subfamily Homininae, to which humans also belong. These two species are the closest living evolutionary relatives to humans, sharing a common ancestor with humans about four to six million years ago.[3] Research by Mary-Claire King in 1973 found 99% identical DNA between human beings and chimpanzees,[4] although research since has modified that finding to about 94%[5] commonality, with some of the difference occurring in noncoding DNA. P. troglodytes and P. paniscus have been proposed to belong with H. sapiens in the genus Homo, rather than in Pan; e.g., by J. Diamond in his book, wherein he refers to man as The Third Chimpanzee. Among the arguments in favor of this reclassification is that other species have been reclassified to belong to the same genus because of less genetic similarity than that between humans and chimpanzees.
Taxonomy of genus Pan[1] Phylogeny of superfamily Hominoidea[6](Fig. 4)
Genus Pan
Common chimpanzee (P. troglodytes)
Central chimpanzee (P. t. troglodytes)
Western chimpanzee (P. t. verus)
Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzee (P. t. ellioti)
Eastern chimpanzee (P. t. schweinfurthii)
Bonobo (P. paniscus)
Hominoidea




humans (genus Homo)


chimpanzees (genus Pan)



gorillas (genus Gorilla)



orangutans (genus Pongo)



gibbons (family Hylobatidae)


Fossils
Though many human fossils have been found, chimpanzee fossils were not described until 2005. Existing chimpanzee populations in West and Central Africa are separate from the major human fossil sites in East Africa; however, chimpanzee fossils have been reported from Kenya, indicating that both humans and members of the Pan clade were present in the East African Rift Valley during the Middle Pleistocene.[7]
File:Pan troglodytes-female-TobuZoo2012.ogv
Play media
(video) Female Chimpanzee at Tobu Zoo in Saitama. Japan
Anatomy and physiology

Human and chimp skulls and brains (not to scale), as illustrated in Gervais' Histoire naturelle des mammifères

The chimpanzee's brain on the left and the man's brain on the right have been scaled to the same size to show the relative proportions of their parts. These drawings were in a book made in 1904 by Thomas Henry Huxley.[8]
The male common chimp stands up to 1.7 m (5.6 ft) high and weighs as much as 70 kg (150 lb); the female is somewhat smaller. The common chimp’s long arms, when extended, span one and a half times the body’s height. A chimpanzee's arms are longer than its legs.[9] The bonobo is slightly shorter and thinner than the common chimpanzee but has longer limbs. In trees, both species climb with their long, powerful arms; on the ground, chimpanzees usually knuckle-walk, or walk on all fours, clenching their fists and supporting themselves on the knuckles thereof. Chimpanzee feet are better suited for walking than are those of the orangutan because the chimp has broader soles and shorter toes.
Both the common chimpanzee and bonobo can walk upright on two legs when carrying objects with their hands and arms. The bonobo has proportionately longer upper limbs and more often walks upright than does the common chimpanzee. The coat is dark; the face, fingers, palms of the hands, and soles of the feet, hairless; the chimp, tailless. The exposed skin of the face, hands and feet varies from pink to very dark in both species but is generally lighter in younger individuals, darkening as maturity is reached. A University of Chicago Medical Centre study has found significant genetic differences between chimpanzee populations.[10] A bony shelf over the eyes gives the forehead a receding appearance, and the nose is flat. Although the jaws protrude, the lips are thrust out only when a chimp pouts.
The brain of a chimpanzee has been measured at ~337 cc,[11][12] ~393 cc,[13] with a general range of 282–500 cc.[14] Human brains, in contrast, have been measured as being three times larger, variously reported volumes include ~1,299 cc,[11][12] ~1,158 cc,[13] and averages of ~1330 cc.[15][16][17][18][19][20][21][22]
Chimpanzee testicles are unusually large for their body size, with a combined weight of about 4 oz (110 g) compared to a gorilla's 1 oz (28 g) or a human's 1.5 ounces (43 g). This relatively great size is generally attributed to sperm competition due to the polyandrous nature of chimpanzee mating behavior.[23] Chimpanzees reach puberty at an age of between eight and 10 years and rarely live past age 40 in the wild, but some have lived longer than 60 years in captivity.
Behavior

Bonobo
Anatomical differences between the common chimpanzee and the bonobo are slight, but sexual and social behaviors are markedly different. The common chimpanzee has an omnivorous diet, a troop hunting culture based on beta males led by an alpha male, and highly complex social relationships. The bonobo, on the other hand, has a mostly frugivorous diet and an egalitarian, nonviolent, matriarchal, sexually receptive behavior.[24] Bonobos frequently have sex, sometimes to help prevent and resolve conflicts. Different groups of chimpanzees also have different cultural behavior with preferences for types of tools.[25] The common chimpanzee tends to display greater aggression than does the bonobo.[26] The average, captive chimpanzee sleeps 9.7 hours per day.[27]
Social structure
Question book-new.svg
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Chimpanzees live in large multi-male and multi-female social groups, which are called communities. Within a community, the position of an individual and the influence the individual has on others dictates a definite social hierarchy. Chimpanzees live in a leaner hierarchy wherein more than one individual may be dominant enough to dominate other members of lower rank. Typically, a dominant male is referred to as the alpha male. The alpha male is the highest-ranking male that controls the group and maintains order during disputes. In chimpanzee society, the 'dominant male' sometimes is not the largest or strongest male but rather the most manipulative and political male that can influence the goings on within a group. Male chimpanzees typically attain dominance by cultivating allies who will support that individual during future ambitions for power. The alpha male regularly displays by puffing his normally slim coat up to increase view size and charge to seem as threatening and as powerful as possible; this behavior serves to intimidate other members and thereby maintain power and authority, and it may be fundamental to the alpha male's holding on to his status. Lower-ranking chimpanzees will show respect by submissively gesturing in body language or reaching out their hands while grunting. Female chimpanzees will show deference to the alpha male by presenting their hindquarters.
Female chimpanzees also have a hierarchy, which is influenced by the position of a female individual within a group. In some chimpanzee communities, the young females may inherit high status from a high-ranking mother. Dominant females will also ally to dominate lower-ranking females: whereas males mainly seek dominant status for its associated mating privileges and sometimes violent domination of subordinates, females seek dominant status to acquire such resources as food. High-ranking females often have first access. Both genders acquire dominant status to improve social standing within a group.
Community female acceptance is necessary for alpha male status; females must ensure that their group visits places that supply them with enough food. A group of dominant females will sometimes oust an alpha male which is not to their preference and back another male, in whom they see potential for leading the group as a successful alpha male.
Intelligence
Further information: Primate cognition

Diagram of brain – topography of the main groups of foci in the motor field of chimpanzee
Chimpanzees make tools and use them to acquire foods and for social displays; they have sophisticated hunting strategies requiring cooperation, influence and rank; they are status conscious, manipulative and capable of deception; they can learn to use symbols and understand aspects of human language including some relational syntax, concepts of number and numerical sequence;[28] and they are capable of spontaneous planning for a future state or event.[29]
Tool use
In October 1960, Jane Goodall observed the use of tools among chimpanzees. Recent research indicates chimpanzee stone tool use dates to at least 4,300 years ago.[30] Chimpanzee tool usage includes digging into termite mounds with a large stick tool, and then using a small stick that has been altered to "fish" the termites out.[31] There have been occasional unsubstantiated or controversial reports of Chimpanzees using rocks or sticks as weapons.[32] A recent study claimed to reveal the use of spears, which common chimpanzees in Senegal sharpen with their teeth and use to stab and pry Senegal bushbabies out of small holes in trees.[33][34] Chimpanzees are also known to use stones as anvils and hammers in order to break open nuts.[35] Before the discovery of tool use in chimps, humans were believed to be the only species to make and use tools, but several other tool-using species are now known.[36][37]
Nest-building
Nest-building, sometimes considered as tool use, is seen in chimpanzees which construct arboreal night nests by lacing together branches from one or more trees. It forms an important part of behavior, especially in the case of mothers who teach this trait to infants. Nests consist of a mattress, supported on a strong foundation, and lined above with soft leaves and twigs, and are built in trees with a minimum diameter of 5 metres (16 ft) and may be located at a height of 3 to 45 metres (9.8 to 147.6 ft). Both day and night nests are built; they may be located in groups.[38] A study in 2014 found that the Muhimbi tree is favoured for nest building by chimpanzees in Uganda due to its physical properties, such as bending strength, inter-node distance, and leaf surface area.[39]
Altruism and emotivity

Chimpanzee mother and baby
Studies have shown chimpanzees engage in apparently altruistic behavior within groups.[40][41] Some researchers have said chimpanzees are indifferent to the welfare of unrelated group members,[42] but a more recent study of wild chimpanzees found that both male and female adults would adopt orphaned young of their group. Also, different groups sometimes share food, form coalitions, and cooperate in hunting and border patrolling.[43] Sometimes chimpanzees have adopted young that come from unrelated groups. And in some rare cases, even male chimps have been shown to take care of abandoned infant chimps of an unrelated group, though in most cases they would kill the infant.[citation needed]
According to James W. Harrod, evidence for chimpanzee emotivity includes display of mourning, "incipient romantic love", rain dances, appreciation of natural beauty such as a sunset over a lake, curiosity and respect towards wildlife (such as the python, which is neither a threat nor a food source to chimpanzees), altruism toward other species (such as feeding turtles) and animism, or "pretend play", in chimps cradling and grooming rocks or sticks.[44]
Communication
Chimps communicate in a manner similar to human nonverbal communication, using vocalizations, hand gestures, and facial expressions. Research into the chimpanzee brain has revealed chimp communication activates an area of the chimp brain in the same position as Broca's area, a language center in the human brain.[45]
There is some debate as to whether chimpanzees have the ability to express hierarchical ideas in language. Studies have found that chimps are capable of learning a limited set of sign language symbols, which they can use to communicate with human trainers. However, it is clear that there are distinct limits to the complexity of knowledge structures with which chimps are capable of dealing. The sentences that they can express are limited to specific simple noun-verb sequences and are not capable of the indefinite expansion of complexity characteristic of humans.
Aggression
Adult common chimpanzees, particularly males, can be very aggressive. They are highly territorial and are known to kill other chimps.[46]
Hunting
Chimpanzees also engage in targeted hunting of lower-order primates such as the red colobus[47] and bush babies,[48][49] and use the meat from these kills as a "social tool" within their community.[50]
Puzzle solving
In February 2013, a study found chimpanzees solve puzzles for entertainment.[51]
Interactions with humans
History
62-year-old chimpanzee
Gregoire: 62-year-old chimpanzee
Africans have had contact with chimpanzees for millennia. Chimpanzees have been kept as pets for centuries in a few African villages, especially in the Democratic Republic of Congo. In Virunga National Park in the east of the country, the park authorities regularly confiscate chimpanzees from people keeping them as pets.[52] The first recorded contact of Europeans with chimps took place in present-day Angola during the 17th century. The diary of Portuguese explorer Duarte Pacheco Pereira (1506), preserved in the Portuguese National Archive (Torre do Tombo), is probably the first European document to acknowledge chimpanzees built their own rudimentary tools.
The first use of the name "chimpanzee", however, did not occur until 1738. The name is derived from a Tshiluba language term kivili-chimpenze, which is the local name for the animal and translates loosely as "mockman" or possibly just "ape". The colloquialism "chimp" was most likely coined some time in the late 1870s.[53] Biologists applied Pan as the genus name of the animal. Chimps, as well as other apes, had also been purported to have been known to Western writers in ancient times, but mainly as myths and legends on the edge of European and Arab societal consciousness, mainly through fragmented and sketchy accounts of European adventurers. Apes are mentioned variously by Aristotle, as well as the English Bible, where they are described as having been collected by Solomon. (1 Kings 10:22. However the Hebrew word, qőf, may mean a monkey.) Apes are mentioned in the Qur'an (7:166), where God tells Israelites who transgressed Shabbat "Be ye apes". The first of these early transcontinental chimpanzees came from Angola and were presented as a gift to Frederick Henry, Prince of Orange in 1640, and were followed by a few of its brethren over the next several years. Scientists described these first chimpanzees as "pygmies", and noted the animals' distinct similarities to humans. The next two decades, a number of the creatures were imported into Europe, mainly acquired by various zoological gardens as entertainment for visitors.

Hugo Rheinhold's Affe mit Schädel ("Ape with skull") is an example of how chimps were viewed at the end of the 19th century.
Darwin's theory of natural selection (published in 1859) spurred scientific interest in chimpanzees, as in much of life science, leading eventually to numerous studies of the animals in the wild and captivity. The observers of chimpanzees at the time were mainly interested in behavior as it related to that of humans. This was less strictly and disinterestedly scientific than it might sound, with much attention being focused on whether or not the animals had traits that could be considered 'good'; the intelligence of chimpanzees was often significantly exaggerated, as immortalized in Hugo Rheinhold's Affe mit Schädel (see image, left). By the end of the 19th century, chimpanzees remained very much a mystery to humans, with very little factual scientific information available.
In the 20th century, a new age of scientific research into chimpanzee behavior began. Before 1960, almost nothing was known about chimpanzee behavior in their natural habitats. In July of that year, Jane Goodall set out to Tanzania's Gombe forest to live among the chimpanzees, where she primarily studied the members of the Kasakela chimpanzee community. Her discovery that chimpanzees made and used tools was groundbreaking, as humans were previously believed to be the only species to do so. The most progressive early studies on chimpanzees were spearheaded primarily by Wolfgang Köhler and Robert Yerkes, both of whom were renowned psychologists. Both men and their colleagues established laboratory studies of chimpanzees focused specifically on learning about the intellectual abilities of chimpanzees, particularly problem-solving. This typically involved basic, practical tests on laboratory chimpanzees, which required a fairly high intellectual capacity (such as how to solve the problem of acquiring an out-of-reach banana). Notably, Yerkes also made extensive observations of chimpanzees in the wild which added tremendously to the scientific understanding of chimpanzees and their behavior. Yerkes studied chimpanzees until World War II, while Köhler concluded five years of study and published his famous Mentality of Apes in 1925 (which is coincidentally when Yerkes began his analyses), eventually concluding, "chimpanzees manifest intelligent behaviour of the general kind familiar in human beings ... a type of behaviour which counts as specifically human" (1925).[54]

Chimpanzee at the Los Angeles Zoo
The August 2008 issue of the American Journal of Primatology reported results of a year-long study of chimpanzees in Tanzania’s Mahale Mountains National Park, which produced evidence of chimpanzees becoming sick from viral infectious diseases they have likely contracted from humans. Molecular, microscopic and epidemiological investigations demonstrated the chimpanzees living at Mahale Mountains National Park have been suffering from a respiratory disease that is likely caused by a variant of a human paramyxovirus.[55]
Animal research
See also: Animal testing on non-human primates § Chimpanzees in the U.S.
As of November 2007, about 1,300 chimpanzees were housed in 10 U.S. laboratories (out of 3,000 great apes living in captivity there), either wild-caught, or acquired from circuses, animal trainers, or zoos.[56] Most of the labs either conduct or make the chimps available for invasive research,[57] defined as "inoculation with an infectious agent, surgery or biopsy conducted for the sake of research and not for the sake of the chimpanzee, and/or drug testing".[58] Two federally funded laboratories use chimps: the Yerkes National Primate Research Center at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, and the Southwest National Primate Center in San Antonio, Texas.[59] Five hundred chimps have been retired from laboratory use in the U.S. and live in animal sanctuaries in the U.S. or Canada.[57]

Ham the Astrochimp before being inserted into the Mercury-Redstone 2 capsule in 1961
Chimpanzees used in biomedical research tend to be used repeatedly over decades, rather than used and killed as with most laboratory animals. Some individual chimps currently in U.S. laboratories have been used in experiments for over 40 years.[60] According to Project R&R, a campaign to release chimps held in U.S. labs—run by the New England Anti-Vivisection Society in conjunction with Jane Goodall and other primate researchers—the oldest known chimp in a U.S. lab is Wenka, which was born in a laboratory in Florida on May 21, 1954.[61] She was removed from her mother on the day of birth to be used in a vision experiment that lasted 17 months, then sold as a pet to a family in North Carolina. She was returned to the Yerkes National Primate Research Center in 1957 when she became too big to handle. Since then, she has given birth six times, and has been the subject of research into alcohol use, oral contraceptives, aging, and cognitive studies.[62]
With the publication of the chimpanzee genome, plans to increase the use of chimps in labs are reportedly increasing, with some scientists arguing the federal moratorium on breeding chimps for research should be lifted.[59][63] A five-year moratorium was imposed by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in 1996, because too many chimps had been bred for HIV research, and it has been extended annually since 2001.[59]
Other researchers argue chimps are unique animals and either should not be used in research, or should be treated differently. Pascal Gagneux, an evolutionary biologist and primate expert at the University of California, San Diego, argues, given chimpanzees' sense of self, tool use, and genetic similarity to human beings, studies using chimps should follow the ethical guidelines used for human subjects unable to give consent.[59] Also, a recent study suggests chimpanzees which are retired from labs exhibit a form of posttraumatic stress disorder.[64] Stuart Zola, director of the Yerkes National Primate Research Laboratory, disagrees. He told National Geographic: "I don't think we should make a distinction between our obligation to treat humanely any species, whether it's a rat or a monkey or a chimpanzee. No matter how much we may wish it, chimps are not human."[59]
An increasing number of governments are enacting a great ape research ban forbidding the use of chimpanzees and other great apes in research or toxicology testing.[65] As of 2006, Austria, New Zealand, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the UK had introduced such bans.[66]
Studies of language
Main article: Great ape language

Side profile of a chimpanzee
Scientists have long been fascinated with the studies of language, believing it to be a unique human cognitive ability. To test this hypothesis, scientists have attempted to teach human language to several species of great apes. One early attempt by Allen and Beatrix Gardner in the 1960s involved spending 51 months teaching American Sign Language (ASL) to a chimpanzee named Washoe. The Gardners reported Washoe learned 151 signs, and she had spontaneously taught them to other chimpanzees.[67] Over a longer period of time, Washoe learned over 800 signs.[68]
Debate is ongoing among some scientists (such as David Premack), about nonhuman great apes' ability to learn language. Since the early reports on Washoe, numerous other studies have been conducted, with varying levels of success,[69] including one involving a chimpanzee named, in parody, Nim Chimpsky, trained by Herbert Terrace of Columbia University. Although his initial reports were quite positive, in November 1979, Terrace and his team (including psycholinguist Thomas Bever) re-evaluated the videotapes of Nim with his trainers, analyzing them frame by frame for signs, as well as for exact context (what was happening both before and after Nim’s signs). In the reanalysis, Terrace and Bever concluded Nim's utterances could be explained merely as prompting on the part of the experimenters, as well as mistakes in reporting the data. "Much of the apes’ behavior is pure drill," he said. "Language still stands as an important definition of the human species." In this reversal, Terrace now argued Nim's use of ASL was not like human language acquisition. Nim never initiated conversations himself, rarely introduced new words, and simply imitated what the humans did. More importantly, Nim's word strings varied in their ordering, suggesting that he was incapable of syntax. Nim’s sentences also did not grow in length, unlike human children whose vocabulary and sentence length show a strong positive correlation.[70]
Memory
A 30-year study at Kyoto University’s Primate Research Institute has shown chimps are able to learn to recognize the numbers 1 through 9 and their values. The chimps further show an aptitude for photographic memory, demonstrated in experiments in which the jumbled digits are flashed onto a computer screen for less than a quarter of a second, after which the chimp, Ayumu, is able to correctly and quickly point to the positions where they appeared in ascending order. The same experiment was failed by human world memory champion Ben Pridmore on most attempts.[71]
Laughter in apes
Young chimpanzees
Young chimpanzees playing
Laughter might not be confined or unique to humans. The differences between chimpanzee and human laughter may be the result of adaptations that have evolved to enable human speech. Self-awareness of one's situation as seen in the mirror test, or the ability to identify with another's predicament (see mirror neurons), are prerequisites for laughter,[citation needed] so animals may be laughing in the same way as humans do.
Chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans show laughter-like vocalizations in response to physical contact, such as wrestling, play-chasing, or tickling. This is documented in wild and captive chimpanzees. Common chimpanzee laughter is not readily recognizable to humans as such, because it is generated by alternating inhalations and exhalations that sound more like breathing and panting. Instances in which nonhuman primates have expressed joy have been reported. One study analyzed and recorded sounds made by human babies and bonobos when tickled. Although the bonobo's laugh was a higher frequency, the laugh followed a pattern similar to that of human babies and included similar facial expressions. Humans and chimpanzees share similar ticklish areas of the body, such as the armpits and belly. The enjoyment of tickling in chimpanzees does not diminish with age.[72]
See also: Laughter in animals
In popular culture
See also: List of fictional primates
Chimpanzees have been commonly stereotyped in popular culture, where they are most often cast in standardized roles as childlike companions, sidekicks or clowns.[73] They are especially suited for the latter role on account of their prominent facial features, long limbs and fast movements, which humans often find amusing. Accordingly, entertainment acts featuring chimpanzees dressed up as humans have been traditional staples of circuses and stage shows.[73]
In the age of television, a new genre of chimp act emerged in the United States: series whose cast consisted entirely of chimpanzees dressed as humans and "speaking" lines dubbed by human actors.[73] These shows, examples of which include Lancelot Link, Secret Chimp in the 1970s or The Chimp Channel in the 1990s, relied on the novelty of their ape cast to make their timeworn, low comedy gags funny.[73] Their chimpanzee "actors" were as interchangeable as the apes in a circus act, being amusing as chimpanzees and not as individuals.[73] Animal rights groups have urged a stop to this practice, considering it animal abuse.[74]
When chimpanzees appear in other TV shows, they generally do so as comic relief sidekicks to humans. In that role, for instance, J. Fred Muggs appeared with Today Show host Dave Garroway in the 1950s, Judy on Daktari in the 1960s or Darwin on The Wild Thornberrys in the 1990s.[73] In contrast to the fictional depictions of other animals, such as dogs (as in Lassie), dolphins (Flipper), horses (The Black Stallion) or even other great apes (King Kong), chimpanzee characters and actions are rarely relevant to the plot.[73]
Portrayals in science fiction
The rare depictions of chimpanzees as individuals rather than stock characters, and as central rather than incidental to the plot[73] are generally found in works of science fiction. Robert A. Heinlein's short story "Jerry Was a Man" (1947) centers on a genetically enhanced chimpanzee suing for better treatment. The 1972 film Conquest of the Planet of the Apes, the third sequel of Planet of the Apes, portrays a futuristic revolt of enslaved apes led by the only talking chimpanzee, Caesar, against their human masters.[73] This concept was revisited in the 2011 film Rise of the Planet of the Apes, again with a chimpanzee protagonist named Caesar. Another short story, "The Pope of the Chimps" by Robert Silverberg, set in the present day, shows the development of the first signs of religiosity in a group of chimpanzees, much to the surprise of the humans observing them. David Brin's Uplift novels present a future in which humans have "uplifted" chimpanzees (and certain other species) with human-level sapience.
See also
Portal icon Primates portal
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Prostitution among animals#Chimpanzees
Chimp Haven
Chimpanzee genome project
Dian Fossey
Great ape personhood
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Notes
^ Jump up to: a b Groves, C. P. (2005). Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M, eds. Mammal Species of the World (3rd ed.). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 182–3. OCLC 62265494. ISBN 0-801-88221-4.
Jump up ^ Shefferly, N. (2005). "Pan troglodytes". Animal Diversity Web (University of Michigan Museum of Zoology). Retrieved 2007-08-11.
Jump up ^ "Chimps and Humans Very Similar at the DNA Level". News.mongabay.com. Retrieved 2009-06-06.
Jump up ^ Mary-Claire King (1973) Protein polymorphisms in chimpanzee and human evolution, Doctoral dissertation, University of California, Berkeley.
Jump up ^ Minkel JR (2006-12-19). "Humans and Chimps: Close But Not That Close". Scientific American.
Jump up ^ Israfil, H.; Zehr, S. M.; Mootnick, A. R.; Ruvolo, M.; Steiper, M. E. (2011). "Unresolved molecular phylogenies of gibbons and siamangs (Family: Hylobatidae) based on mitochondrial, Y-linked, and X-linked loci indicate a rapid Miocene radiation or sudden vicariance event" (PDF). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 58 (3): 447–455. doi:10.1016/j.ympev.2010.11.005. PMC 3046308. PMID 21074627. edit
Jump up ^ McBrearty, S.; N. G. Jablonski (2005-09-01). "First fossil chimpanzee". Nature 437 (7055): 105–8. doi:10.1038/nature04008. PMID 16136135.
Jump up ^ Huxley, T. H. (1904). Science and education: Essays. JA Hill and company.
Jump up ^ "Chimpanzee", Rolling Hills Wildlife Adventure 2005
Jump up ^ "Gene study shows three distinct groups of chimpanzees". EurekAlert. 2007-04-20. Retrieved 2007-04-23.
^ Jump up to: a b Rilling, J. K.; Insel, T. R. (1998). "Evolution of the cerebellum in primates: Differences in relative volume among monkeys, apes and humans". Brain, behavior and evolution 52 (6): 308–314. doi:10.1159/000006575. PMID 9807015. edit
^ Jump up to: a b Rilling, J.; Insel, T. R. (1999). "The primate neocortex in comparative perspective using magnetic resonance imaging". Journal of Human Evolution 37 (2): 191–223. doi:10.1006/jhev.1999.0313. PMID 10444351. edit
^ Jump up to: a b Semendeferi, K; Armstrong, E; Schleicher, A; Zilles, K; Van Hoesen, GW (2001). "Prefrontal cortex in humans and apes: A comparative study of area 10". American journal of physical anthropology 114 (3): 224–41. doi:10.1002/1096-8644(200103)114:3<224::AID-AJPA1022>3.0.CO;2-I. PMID 11241188. Semendeferi et al. using unclear ns of 1–5, report 1,158 cm3 for human brains; chimps have 393 cm3
Jump up ^ Tobias, P. (1971). The Brain in Hominid Evolution. New York, Columbia University Press, hdl:2246/6020; cited in Schoenemann PT. 1997. An MRI study of the relationship between human neuroanatomy and behavioral ability. PhD diss. Univ. of Calif., Berkeley
Jump up ^ Schoenemann, P. Thomas (2006). "Evolution of the Size and Functional Areas of the Human Brain". Annual Review of Anthropology 35: 379. doi:10.1146/annurev.anthro.35.081705.123210. "Modern human brain sizes vary widely, but average ∼1330 cc (Dekaban 1978, Garby et al. 1993, Ho et al. 1980a, Pakkenberg & Voigt 1964)" these references are listed on this page.
Jump up ^ Dekaban AS; Sadowsky, Doris (1978). "Changes in brain weights during the span of human life: relation of brain weights to body heights and body weights". Annals of Neurology 4 (4): 345–56. doi:10.1002/ana.410040410. PMID 727739.
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Jump up ^ Ho, K. C.; Roessmann, U.; Straumfjord, J. V.; Monroe, G. (1980). "Analysis of brain weight. I. Adult brain weight in relation to sex, race, and age". Archives of pathology & laboratory medicine 104 (12): 635–639. PMID 6893659. edit
Jump up ^ Pakkenberg H, Voigt J (1964). "Brain weight of the Danes". Acta Anatom 56 (4): 297–307. doi:10.1159/000142510.
Jump up ^ Hofman, M. A. (1983). "Encephalization in hominids: Evidence for the model of punctuationalism". Brain, behavior and evolution 22 (2–3): 102–117. doi:10.1159/000121511. PMID 6405974. edit
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Jump up ^ Holland, Jennifer S. (July 2011) "40 Winks?", National Geographic Vol. 220, No. 1.
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Jump up ^ Osvath, Mathias (2009-03-10). "Spontaneous planning for future stone throwing by a male chimpanzee". Curr. Biol. 19 (5): R190–1. doi:10.1016/j.cub.2009.01.010. PMID 19278627.
Jump up ^ Mercader J, Barton H, Gillespie J, et al. (2007). "4,300-year-old chimpanzee sites and the origins of percussive stone technology". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 104 (9): 3043–8. doi:10.1073/pnas.0607909104. PMC 1805589. PMID 17360606.
Jump up ^ Bijal T. (2004-09-06). "Chimps Shown Using Not Just a Tool but a "Tool Kit"". Retrieved 2010-01-20.
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Jump up ^ Fox, M. (2007-02-22). "Hunting chimps may change view of human evolution". Archived from the original on 2007-02-24. Retrieved 2007-02-22.
Jump up ^ "ISU anthropologist's study is first to report chimps hunting with tools". Iowa State University News Service. 2007-02-22. Retrieved 2007-08-11.
Jump up ^ Carvalho Susana, et al. (2008). "Chaînes Opératoires and resource-exploitation strategies in chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) nut cracking". Journal of Human Evolution 55: 148–163.
Jump up ^ Whipps, Heather (2007-02-12). "Chimps Learned Tool Use Long Ago Without Human Help". LiveScience. Retrieved 2007-08-11.
Jump up ^ "Tool Use". Jane Goodall Institute. Archived from the original on 2007-05-20. Retrieved 2007-08-11.
Jump up ^ Wrangham, Richard W. (1996). Chimpanzee cultures. Chicago Academy of Sciences, Harvard University Press. pp. 115–125. ISBN 978-0-674-11663-4.
Jump up ^ Samson DR, Hunt KD (2014). "Chimpanzees Preferentially Select Sleeping Platform Construction Tree Species with Biomechanical Properties that Yield Stable, Firm, but Compliant Nests". PLoS ONE 9(4): e95361. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0095361. Retrieved 17 April 2014.
Jump up ^ "Human-like Altruism Shown In Chimpanzees". Science Daily. 2007-06-25. Retrieved 2007-08-11.
Jump up ^ Bradley, Brenda (June 1999). "Levels of Selection, Altruism, and Primate Behavior". The Quarterly Review of Biology 74 (2): 171–194. doi:10.1086/393070. PMID 10412224.
Jump up ^ Silk JB, Brosnan missosology, Vonk J, et al. (2005). "Chimpanzees are indifferent to the welfare of unrelated group members". Nature 437 (7063): 1357–9. doi:10.1038/nature04243. PMID 16251965.
Jump up ^ Boesch, C., Bolé, C.; Eckhardt, N.; Boesch, H. (2010). Santos, Laurie, ed. "Altruism in Forest Chimpanzees: The Case of Adoption". PLoS ONE 5 (1): e8901. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0008901.
Jump up ^ Harrod, James (May 10, 2007). "Appendices for Chimpanzee Spirituality: A Concise Synthesis of the Literature" (PDF). Retrieved 2011-01-28.
Jump up ^ "Communication". Evolve. Season 1. Episode 7. 2008-09-14.
Jump up ^ Walsh, Bryan (2009-02-18). "Why the Stamford Chimp Attacked". TIME. Retrieved 2009-06-06.
Jump up ^ Teelen S (2008). "Influence of chimpanzee predation on the red colobus population at Ngogo, Kibale National Park, Uganda". Primates 49 (1): 41–9. doi:10.1007/s10329-007-0062-1. PMID 17906844.
Jump up ^ Gibbons A (2007). "Primate behavior. Spear-wielding chimps seen hunting bush babies". Science 315 (5815): 1063. doi:10.1126/science.315.5815.1063. PMID 17322034.
Jump up ^ Pruetz JD, Bertolani P (2007). "Savanna chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes verus, hunt with tools". Curr. Biol. 17 (5): 412–7. doi:10.1016/j.cub.2006.12.042. PMID 17320393.
Jump up ^ Hockings KJ, Humle T, Anderson JR, et al. (2007). Brosnan, Sarah, ed. "Chimpanzees share forbidden fruit". PLoS ONE 2 (9): e886. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0000886. PMC 1964537. PMID 17849015.
Jump up ^ Richard Gray (24 February 2013). "Chimps solve puzzles for the thrill of it, researchers find". Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 24 February 2013.
Jump up ^ "Gorilla diary: August – December 2008". BBC News. 2009-01-20. Retrieved 2010-04-28.
Jump up ^ "chimp definition | Dictionary.com". Dictionary.reference.com. Retrieved 2009-06-06.
Jump up ^ Goodall, Jane (1986). The Chimpanzees of Gombe: Patterns of Behavior. Cambridge, Mass.: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press. ISBN 0-674-11649-6.
Jump up ^ Newswise: Researchers Find Human Virus in Chimpanzees Retrieved on June 5, 2008.
Jump up ^ "End chimpanzee research: overview". Project R&R, New England Anti-Vivisection Society. 2005-12-11. Retrieved 2008-03-24.
^ Jump up to: a b "Chimpanzee lab and sanctuary map". The Humane Society of the United States. Retrieved 2008-03-24.
Jump up ^ "Chimpanzee Research: Overview of Research Uses and Costs". Humane Society of the United States. Archived from the original on 2008-03-07. Retrieved 2008-03-24.
^ Jump up to: a b c d e Lovgren, Stefan. Should Labs Treat Chimps More Like Humans?, National Geographic News, September 6, 2005.
Jump up ^ Chimps Deserve Better, Humane Society of the United States.
Jump up ^ A former Yerkes lab worker. "Release & Restitution for Chimpanzees in U.S. Laboratories " Wenka". Releasechimps.org. Retrieved 2009-06-06.
Jump up ^ Wenka, Project R&R, New England Anti-Vivisection Society.
Jump up ^ Langley, Gill (June 2006). Next of Kin: A Report on the Use of Primates in Experiments, British Union for the Abolition of Vivisection, p. 15, citing VandeBerg JL, Zola SM (September 2005). "A unique biomedical resource at risk". Nature 437 (7055): 30–2. doi:10.1038/437030a. PMID 16136112.
Jump up ^ Bradshaw GA, Capaldo T, Lindner L, Grow G (2008). "Building an inner sanctuary: complex PTSD in chimpanzees" (PDF). J Trauma Dissociation 9 (1): 9–34. doi:10.1080/15299730802073619. PMID 19042307.
Jump up ^ Guldberg, Helen. The great ape debate, Spiked online, March 29, 2001. Retrieved August 12, 2007.
Jump up ^ Langley, Gill (June 2006). Next of Kin: A Report on the Use of Primates in Experiments, British Union for the Abolition of Vivisection, p. 12.
Jump up ^ Gardner, R. A., Gardner, B. T. (1969). "Teaching Sign Language to a Chimpanzee". Science 165 (3894): 664–672. doi:10.1126/science.165.3894.664. PMID 5793972.
Jump up ^ Allen, G. R., Gardner, B. T. (1980). "Comparative psychology and language acquisition". In Thomas A. Sebok and Jean-Umiker-Sebok (eds.). Speaking of Apes: A Critical Anthology of Two-Way Communication with Man. New York: Plenum Press. pp. 287–329. ISBN 0306402793.
Jump up ^ "Language of Bonobos". Great Ape Trust. Archived from the original on 2004-08-15. Retrieved 2012-01-16.
Jump up ^ Wynne, Clive (October 31, 2007). "eSkeptic". Skeptic. Retrieved 2011-01-28.
Jump up ^ The study was presented in a Channel 5 (UK) documentary "The Memory Chimp", part of the channel's Extraordinary Animals series.
Jump up ^ Johnson, Steven (2003-04-01). "Emotions and the Brain". Discover Magazine. Retrieved 2007-12-10.
^ Jump up to: a b c d e f g h i Van Riper, A. Bowdoin (2002). Science in popular culture: a reference guide. Westport: Greenwood Press. pp. 18–19. ISBN 0-313-31822-0.
Jump up ^ "Animal Actors | PETA.org". Nomoremonkeybusiness.com. Retrieved 2011-01-28.
References
Pickrell, John. (September 24, 2002). "Humans, Chimps Not as Closely Related as Thought?". National Geographic.
Further reading
Hawks, John. "How Strong Is a Chimpanzee?" Slate, February 25, 2009.
External links
Wikiquote has quotations related to: Chimpanzee
Wikispecies has information related to: Chimpanzee
Media related to Pan at Wikimedia Commons
Wikisource-logo.svg Ernest Ingersoll (1920). "Chimpanzee". Encyclopedia Americana.
Stanford, Craig B. The Predatory Behavior and Ecology of Wild Chimpanzees university of Southern California. 2002(?)
ChimpCARE.org
View the panTro4 genome assembly in the UCSC Genome Browser.
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Extant species of family Hominidae (Great apes)
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Ape-related articles
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Topics in phylogenetics
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Re: WOOO YVETHE SANTIAGO

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What I Did On My Birthday, The World's Longest Essay About Nothing
Posted: Feb 11, 2010
37
Comments
Before I shut up about it once and for all, I would like to tell you a little bit about my birthday. First of all, if you can swing it, I highly recommend taking the day off work for your birthday, particularly if your birthday is on a Monday. This way you can stay in bed until 11am, reading your new library book (Lorrie Moore's A Gate at the Stairs, very enjoyable so far), periodically cackling to yourself with self-important glee because NO MORNING MEETING FOR YOU HAHAHA. Well, unless that morning meeting is with your bed, your library book, and a flaky pain au chocolat. High five!

(Did I just confess to spending the first few hours of my 30th birthday reading a library book? There's a punchline to a joke in there somewhere, isn't there? My 21-year-old self would be apalled.)

The next item on my agenda was to shower, dress, and go and get a mani-pedi, something I hadn't done---I recalled, as I was sitting in the weird massage chair, suddenly having jittery flashbacks---since the day before my wedding. The mani-pedi the day before my wedding was, if you remember, at the evocatively-named Nails 2 U (no, nails to you, buddy!) and I have very little memory of it aside from a) wearing some very short shorts that I would not be able to squeeze my way into these days if you greased them with a stick of butter first, and b) holding up a color to my show my sister, having her say "I'm not sure if it's very bridal," having the nail salon owner go "Oh! Who's the bride?" and subsequently experiencing a very, very, very surreal out-of-body experience that involved me saying "Whoa. Me!"

This mani-pedi, needless to say, was far less fraught with existental crises, and I left for my next stop, which was meeting Sean at The Sentinel to pick up the world's best sandwiches---they're corned beef, but please don't let that put you off; I don't like corned beef either and these are INSANE---and then eat them in Yerba Buena Gardens, along with a brownie and a cookie from Specialty's (if you're coming to San Francisco soon, I hope you're taking notes. As you can see, I like to eat.)

After lunch, I had about a half hour to kill, so I wandered into Anthropologie, where I had a 15% off coupon they'd sent me as a reward for....being born in February, I guess? I don't know, something like that. I never shop in Anthropologie, mostly because I feel like everything is either artfully ripped or six kajillion dollars (or both), but I figured I would browse the sale racks and see if anything struck my fancy. I took a pile of dresses into the dressing room, half-heartedly considered one until I discovered that it was $128 on sale---and it wasn't anything fancy, just a cotton sundress, though I suppose the fact that it used to be $228 probably made it some warped sort of deal somehow---and then left twenty minutes later empty-handed.

Now I don't know if you've ever been to the Anthropologie in San Francisco, but it is multi-level and the changing rooms are pretty much as far from the exit as you can get: to walk from the changing rooms to the exit, in fact, you have to traverse practically the whole store, which includes a rather long climb up a staircase in the middle. This is important. Remember this for later. Because as I was making this trek from the changing rooms to the exit, I kept hearing this: "Excuse me! Excuse me!"

They can't be talking to me, I thought, and so I kept walking, and I'd just made it out of the store and onto the street, when I felt a hand clasp my shoulder. Am I about to be accused of SHOPLIFTING? I thought, my mind wandering to the many educational after-school specials I had seen on the subject (cough, Beverly Hills 90210, cough). I span around, expecting to be faced with a burly security guard and found instead a diminutive Asian girl who made an apologetic face. "I just wanted to tell you," she whispered, "that your dress is tucked into your tights at the back."

Yes, Internet, I cannot make this shit up. On my thirtieth birthday, I walked the length and breadth of Anthropologie WITH MY UNDERWEAR FULLY ON DISPLAY. Well, that's certainly a way to celebrate, isn't it?

But you know, I was mortified by this for about five seconds---I thanked the girl profusely for following me through the store to catch up with me, god knows what sort of view she must have endured to do that---but by the time I was a few blocks away from Anthropologie, I was actually chuckling quite mirthfully at the situation. Aha! I thought! This is because I am now thirty! I am mature and wise and I have ceased to care what people think of me anymore! It happened just like they said it would!

Good job, however, that my next stop was the spa---specifically, this spa, which, despite the fact that it plays Enya when you click on that link, was really quite delightful---because it took my mind entirely off the fact that I'd just flashed the entire clientele of Anthropologie and instead set it to far more coherent thoughts like aaaaaaaaaaaaaaahhhh and mmmmmmmmm and ooooooh. I had a groupon, you see---have you heard of Groupon? I'm obsessed with it---so I booked a massage as a special treat, and then took advantage of the fact that it was three o'clock on a Monday afternoon and I had nowhere else to be and spent an obscene amount of time in the steam room. My god, I love the steam room. I went in, like, three separate times. My skin looked fabulous afterwards, I'm telling you. If I'm ever rich enough, I'm going to install a steam room in my house and I will conduct all business from there, except maybe not anything that requires a) paper (it'll droop) and b) me to meet publicly with anyone (I'll be sweaty), though everything else apart from that will be fair game.

Anyway, after I finally left the locker room at the spa---they had a shower with ten shower heads, which didn't so much give one the impression of showering but rather of being caught in a tropical monsoon---I did a quick spot of shopping in Union Square (found a dress and some earrings) and then returned home, where it was time for champagne, and not just champagne, but also presents. Sean gave me an Arco lamp, which I have been coveting for years---I don't have a picture of it since it's currently sitting in three pieces on our living room floor, but it looks like this (PS: how much do you want that giant globe in the corner?)---and also some Hunter wellington boots, which might sound dorky to you, but which I have also been coveting for years, though particularly strongly for the last few weeks when the rain was coming down in San Francisco like a shower with ten showerheads.



Wait, what do you mean I'm supposed to take the tag off first?

I thought this was the end of the presents---it was certainly enough for me---but he had one more surprise up his sleeve, and when I show you this next photo, I think you will quite likely be able to feel my excitement LEAPING OUT OF THE COMPUTER AND CRACKLING ONTO YOUR SKIN, that's how pumped I was about it.



Yes, my friends, that is a new camera, the first DSLR I've ever owned. I think you can see that I like it.

The day ended with a delicious dinner at Chapeau!, which I would recommend you run to if you are ever in the San Francisco area and like steak, cheese, butter, and waiters with French accents, and I have to say, it was truly one of the most brilliant days I've had in a while.





I would also like to shut up, finally, about turning thirty, because for all my silly fretting and worrying---which your fantastic comments completely helped to eradicate, by the way---it really wasn't as huge a deal as I'd thought it would be. In fact, it really wasn't a big deal at all. Apart from that bit where I walked around with my dress tucked into my tights and my bum hanging out in a major urban retail store, of course. That part wasn't my favorite.

Lots more photos here, though thankfully none of that scene in Anthropologie. We're just going to pretend that never happened.

Filed Under: Me, Me, Me, Me, Me, The San Francisco Adventure
1
Connie
Feb 12, 2010
You make me smile. I'm glad you had a good birthday. Everyone should feel pampered on their birthday.

2
Isobel
Feb 12, 2010
Yep, turning 30 was fine. It was 31 that was horrible ;)

Glad you had such a good birthday - great camera!

3
Catherine
Feb 12, 2010
You make an excellent case for the Birthday Day Off. (Beats hiding in the printroom hoping no-one has remembered, lest there be a public serenade. Yeesh.)

Also, lovely haircut.

4
Kavita
Feb 12, 2010
Love the 'excuse me' story, and it was great reading all the details of your 30th birthday. Sounds absolutely perfect.

5
shan
Feb 12, 2010
Sounds like an absolutely amazing day, Holly, one that I want to try to recreate when it's my birthday again! Glad you had a great day!

6
Helen
Feb 12, 2010
Any day that starts with pain au chocolat and ends with chocolate souffle cake by way of champagne and Kir Royale is going to be good! By the way, I love how in the photo of you with the Veuve Cliquot box, Charlie is staring up at it like he's after a glass. You clearly have a cat with classy tastes.

7
Nicki
Feb 12, 2010
You are amazing! You have already discovered the secret to aging gracefully and you did it in only one day!

Remember the good, forget the bad.

See?

8
nku
Feb 12, 2010
What an awesome post.

I’m going to keep this and use it as a template for my 30th birthday. Even the knicker flashing bit. I’m bound to do something shameful, it might just as well be that!

Happy Birthday.

9
Lori
Feb 12, 2010
at least you did have the tights on!

10
Home Sweet Sarah
Feb 12, 2010
This is exactly like my birthday (which is today), except that the sound of rustling wrapping paper caused me to get up before 6AM, not 11AM. Either way, though, the mani-pedi and the massage? Right there with ya.

11
Chelle
Feb 12, 2010
You are going to love your Rebel.
I have had mine for several years now and it is, hands down, the best present my husband ever gave me and, he gave me two beautiful children so, yeah...LOVE the Rebel.
P.S. It sounds like your birthday was perfect and you really will love your thirties :)

12
beyond
Feb 12, 2010
of course now i'm dying to know which nail colors are bridal and which are not.
my aunt once ran down a busy street after a woman who had her skirt tucked into her panties. the woman was so grateful, she almost kissed my aunt's feet.

13
Ris
Feb 12, 2010
I can never afford anything in Anthropologie, nor am I ever 100% sure I want to. Like yeah, that top is *kind* of cute and *maybe* I could pull it off. Oh, what's that you say? It's $75 and in no way work-appropriate so essentially I could only wear it on the weekend and when it's at least 80 degrees out? Alright then, that's a no.

14
Arina
Feb 12, 2010
Sounds like a lovely day, all around! (And I agree with you on Anthropologie. The quality never seems to live up to the price, which annoys me greatly about that store.)

15
Lori
Feb 12, 2010
Happy Belated Birthday! What a hilarious story. Better the undies showing then, say, something like toilet paper hanging out. (Which happened to someone I know) Yikes!

16
Amy --- Just A Titch
Feb 12, 2010
What a lovely birthday! Glad it was so wonderful.

P.S. I tucked my dress into my tights last week...except I was at work. And a co-worker had to tell me. At least I didn't walk into my classroom of 35 13-year-olds with my underwear showing. BUT STILL.

17
Chris
Feb 12, 2010
Ooooh...the Rebel. I bought myself the same camera last year for my 38th b-day and now every gift giving event is filled with ..oooh, I'd really love this lens or oooh, I need a new bag

18
HIp Hip Gin Gin
Feb 12, 2010
Sounds like you had a perfect birthday! I hope my 30th is that fabulous. Right down to the wellington boots which by the way are totally not dorky I have been coveting them forever as well since every time it rains in New England there is some sort of flood.
And hey, if flashing a bit of bum is the price one has to pay for the rest of the day being so fantastic, then sign my bum up!!

19
Chris
Feb 12, 2010
Firstly Happy Birthday(!), and I am glad you're not dwelling on that unfortunate dress-stuck-in-tights incident. And secondly- oh MAN am I jealous of your Rebel. That is what I have been coveting for years. YEARS. Enjoy!

20
Jennie
Feb 12, 2010
You've set a very high Birthday Bar that I'll aim for next year. Although Birthday Bar also sounds like the great name of a place that only serves desserts with candles while people sing to you.

21
Nothing But Bonfires
Feb 12, 2010
Jennie, I think you've just had a million dollar business idea.

22
Jill
Feb 12, 2010
1. Happy birthday! What a lovely post.
2. Have you had a sandwich at Ike's yet? They're insane. Onion rings, mozzarella sticks—on a sandwich? And oh, his dirty sauce! (Wait, that sounded extra dirty.) The lines are crazy but the wait is SO worth it.
3. The boots! I wanted the silver pair until I saw them live (a little too Tinman) so now I covet the red. And have you seen the sock inserts? Fabulous!

23
AnEmily
Feb 12, 2010
That's the same camera I got for my 39th birthday...er, over a year ago. I'm old. The camera is great-you'll love it! notmartha.com had a lot of great things to say about it too.

24
Allison
Feb 12, 2010
De-lurking to ask if anyone ever asks you if they want your life? Because I do. You have a lovely, beautiful life. And you seem very happy. All the best, from this rambling de-lurker!

25
Kelly
Feb 12, 2010
Yep, been to that Anthropologie and agree, it's huge and set up badly. I never get anything there either.

I love Specialty's HUGE chocolate chip cookies! Although where I work we order food from there constantly, so it can be very dangerous to have those cookies around me all the time.

Love the DSLR, perfect gift! I just bought myself (as a Christmas present to me) the Canon T1i and love it!

26
Valerie
Feb 12, 2010
Not sure if they would come in handy in San Fran, but did you know they also make fleece liner socks for the Hunter boots? I live in the midwest and got some so that I could wear my Hunter's in the snow without getting frostbite on my toes and they work great!

27
Laurie
Feb 13, 2010
My sister once walked 10 blocks through downtown Chicago before someone told her that her skirt was tucked into the back of her waistband. San Franciscans must be very friendly!

28
Melanie
Feb 14, 2010
Your day sounds delightful. I love reading about your life, even if I'm slightly jealous.

29
Sarah Ashley
Feb 16, 2010
Holly, I can't believe you are 30! You are in great shape & look younger than you really are. (I'm told the same too. I really think it will pay off one day when we're older) Where did you find those lovely earnings?

30
Kristabella
Feb 16, 2010
Sometimes I think "man, these crazy things only happen to me!" (see: crazy biker chasing me into a salon.)

And then I read your post and it's like straight out of a YM Say Anything column and then I realize that it is why I love you! Because you tell the internet these things! And crazy things happen to you too!

So happy you had a wonderful birthday my friend!

31
NothingButBonfires
Feb 16, 2010
Thank you, Sarah Ashley! Earrings are just H&M.

32
Sutswana
Feb 21, 2010
Reading this belatedly but I have to share: just a few days after your bday I had to take a towel to my daughter who had just finished her swim lesson at the community center pool. To do this I had to weave my way through the small crowd of parents on the bleacher things, descend the stairs to the pool area, walk the length of the pool, all this in front of the glass-wall observation deck above, and then all the way back again. My husband was bug-eyed when I got back, said, "Turn around, but don't do it obviously." (Wha??) So I did, and he calmly informed me I had a length of toilet paper flapping out the top of my jeans. Lovely.

Happy belated birthday, and congrats on finally crossing the perceived hurdle of turning 30.

33
annie
Feb 22, 2010
ONE: The last time I was in that anthropologie in the city I was nine months pregnant. OH YES I DO remember the walk from the fitting rooms to the entrance. I had to sit down and take a break half way. And then another break on the stairs.

TWO: When my husband and I were in Rome on our honeymoon we were eating dinner at this little cafe in the piazza navona. After using the (oh so tiny) restroom I was walking back outside when the old man bartender and the old men coffee drinkers kept saying to me "signorina! signorina!" which I simply ignored because I was on my HONEYMOON and I didn't care to deal with old italian men being, well, old italian men. A few minutes after sitting back down at our table it hit me: that bathroom was REALLY small. I was wearing A LOT of layers. There was a log of WIGGLING involved in getting said layers back in their proper place. Already knowing what I was going to find, I took my hand reached back to the waist of my jeans. Yup. A toilet paper tail. Lovely.

34
Lindsay
Apr 12, 2010
On a scale of 1-10, how much do you LOVE your Rebel? I want to splurge and get one, but can only do so in good conscience if I know it's a 9 or a 10 :)

35
Gorgonz
Jul 01, 2010
Good luck with your work and keep it up.

serving dish | vanity table

36
Brian
Mar 08, 2011
I honestly always wanted to get something like this for my birthday, but it seems I haven't reached that level of being so luck as you are.

However, I'm working hard to get there ;)

Brian

37
Ben Dover
Apr 17, 2012
kill yoursef before your next birthday please

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What I Did On My Birthday, The World's Longest Essay About Nothing
Posted: Feb 11, 2010
37
Comments
Before I shut up about it once and for all, I would like to tell you a little bit about my birthday. First of all, if you can swing it, I highly recommend taking the day off work for your birthday, particularly if your birthday is on a Monday. This way you can stay in bed until 11am, reading your new library book (Lorrie Moore's A Gate at the Stairs, very enjoyable so far), periodically cackling to yourself with self-important glee because NO MORNING MEETING FOR YOU HAHAHA. Well, unless that morning meeting is with your bed, your library book, and a flaky pain au chocolat. High five!

(Did I just confess to spending the first few hours of my 30th birthday reading a library book? There's a punchline to a joke in there somewhere, isn't there? My 21-year-old self would be apalled.)

The next item on my agenda was to shower, dress, and go and get a mani-pedi, something I hadn't done---I recalled, as I was sitting in the weird massage chair, suddenly having jittery flashbacks---since the day before my wedding. The mani-pedi the day before my wedding was, if you remember, at the evocatively-named Nails 2 U (no, nails to you, buddy!) and I have very little memory of it aside from a) wearing some very short shorts that I would not be able to squeeze my way into these days if you greased them with a stick of butter first, and b) holding up a color to my show my sister, having her say "I'm not sure if it's very bridal," having the nail salon owner go "Oh! Who's the bride?" and subsequently experiencing a very, very, very surreal out-of-body experience that involved me saying "Whoa. Me!"

This mani-pedi, needless to say, was far less fraught with existental crises, and I left for my next stop, which was meeting Sean at The Sentinel to pick up the world's best sandwiches---they're corned beef, but please don't let that put you off; I don't like corned beef either and these are INSANE---and then eat them in Yerba Buena Gardens, along with a brownie and a cookie from Specialty's (if you're coming to San Francisco soon, I hope you're taking notes. As you can see, I like to eat.)

After lunch, I had about a half hour to kill, so I wandered into Anthropologie, where I had a 15% off coupon they'd sent me as a reward for....being born in February, I guess? I don't know, something like that. I never shop in Anthropologie, mostly because I feel like everything is either artfully ripped or six kajillion dollars (or both), but I figured I would browse the sale racks and see if anything struck my fancy. I took a pile of dresses into the dressing room, half-heartedly considered one until I discovered that it was $128 on sale---and it wasn't anything fancy, just a cotton sundress, though I suppose the fact that it used to be $228 probably made it some warped sort of deal somehow---and then left twenty minutes later empty-handed.

Now I don't know if you've ever been to the Anthropologie in San Francisco, but it is multi-level and the changing rooms are pretty much as far from the exit as you can get: to walk from the changing rooms to the exit, in fact, you have to traverse practically the whole store, which includes a rather long climb up a staircase in the middle. This is important. Remember this for later. Because as I was making this trek from the changing rooms to the exit, I kept hearing this: "Excuse me! Excuse me!"

They can't be talking to me, I thought, and so I kept walking, and I'd just made it out of the store and onto the street, when I felt a hand clasp my shoulder. Am I about to be accused of SHOPLIFTING? I thought, my mind wandering to the many educational after-school specials I had seen on the subject (cough, Beverly Hills 90210, cough). I span around, expecting to be faced with a burly security guard and found instead a diminutive Asian girl who made an apologetic face. "I just wanted to tell you," she whispered, "that your dress is tucked into your tights at the back."

Yes, Internet, I cannot make this shit up. On my thirtieth birthday, I walked the length and breadth of Anthropologie WITH MY UNDERWEAR FULLY ON DISPLAY. Well, that's certainly a way to celebrate, isn't it?

But you know, I was mortified by this for about five seconds---I thanked the girl profusely for following me through the store to catch up with me, god knows what sort of view she must have endured to do that---but by the time I was a few blocks away from Anthropologie, I was actually chuckling quite mirthfully at the situation. Aha! I thought! This is because I am now thirty! I am mature and wise and I have ceased to care what people think of me anymore! It happened just like they said it would!

Good job, however, that my next stop was the spa---specifically, this spa, which, despite the fact that it plays Enya when you click on that link, was really quite delightful---because it took my mind entirely off the fact that I'd just flashed the entire clientele of Anthropologie and instead set it to far more coherent thoughts like aaaaaaaaaaaaaaahhhh and mmmmmmmmm and ooooooh. I had a groupon, you see---have you heard of Groupon? I'm obsessed with it---so I booked a massage as a special treat, and then took advantage of the fact that it was three o'clock on a Monday afternoon and I had nowhere else to be and spent an obscene amount of time in the steam room. My god, I love the steam room. I went in, like, three separate times. My skin looked fabulous afterwards, I'm telling you. If I'm ever rich enough, I'm going to install a steam room in my house and I will conduct all business from there, except maybe not anything that requires a) paper (it'll droop) and b) me to meet publicly with anyone (I'll be sweaty), though everything else apart from that will be fair game.

Anyway, after I finally left the locker room at the spa---they had a shower with ten shower heads, which didn't so much give one the impression of showering but rather of being caught in a tropical monsoon---I did a quick spot of shopping in Union Square (found a dress and some earrings) and then returned home, where it was time for champagne, and not just champagne, but also presents. Sean gave me an Arco lamp, which I have been coveting for years---I don't have a picture of it since it's currently sitting in three pieces on our living room floor, but it looks like this (PS: how much do you want that giant globe in the corner?)---and also some Hunter wellington boots, which might sound dorky to you, but which I have also been coveting for years, though particularly strongly for the last few weeks when the rain was coming down in San Francisco like a shower with ten showerheads.



Wait, what do you mean I'm supposed to take the tag off first?

I thought this was the end of the presents---it was certainly enough for me---but he had one more surprise up his sleeve, and when I show you this next photo, I think you will quite likely be able to feel my excitement LEAPING OUT OF THE COMPUTER AND CRACKLING ONTO YOUR SKIN, that's how pumped I was about it.



Yes, my friends, that is a new camera, the first DSLR I've ever owned. I think you can see that I like it.

The day ended with a delicious dinner at Chapeau!, which I would recommend you run to if you are ever in the San Francisco area and like steak, cheese, butter, and waiters with French accents, and I have to say, it was truly one of the most brilliant days I've had in a while.





I would also like to shut up, finally, about turning thirty, because for all my silly fretting and worrying---which your fantastic comments completely helped to eradicate, by the way---it really wasn't as huge a deal as I'd thought it would be. In fact, it really wasn't a big deal at all. Apart from that bit where I walked around with my dress tucked into my tights and my bum hanging out in a major urban retail store, of course. That part wasn't my favorite.

Lots more photos here, though thankfully none of that scene in Anthropologie. We're just going to pretend that never happened.

Filed Under: Me, Me, Me, Me, Me, The San Francisco Adventure
1
Connie
Feb 12, 2010
You make me smile. I'm glad you had a good birthday. Everyone should feel pampered on their birthday.

2
Isobel
Feb 12, 2010
Yep, turning 30 was fine. It was 31 that was horrible ;)

Glad you had such a good birthday - great camera!

3
Catherine
Feb 12, 2010
You make an excellent case for the Birthday Day Off. (Beats hiding in the printroom hoping no-one has remembered, lest there be a public serenade. Yeesh.)

Also, lovely haircut.

4
Kavita
Feb 12, 2010
Love the 'excuse me' story, and it was great reading all the details of your 30th birthday. Sounds absolutely perfect.

5
shan
Feb 12, 2010
Sounds like an absolutely amazing day, Holly, one that I want to try to recreate when it's my birthday again! Glad you had a great day!

6
Helen
Feb 12, 2010
Any day that starts with pain au chocolat and ends with chocolate souffle cake by way of champagne and Kir Royale is going to be good! By the way, I love how in the photo of you with the Veuve Cliquot box, Charlie is staring up at it like he's after a glass. You clearly have a cat with classy tastes.

7
Nicki
Feb 12, 2010
You are amazing! You have already discovered the secret to aging gracefully and you did it in only one day!

Remember the good, forget the bad.

See?

8
nku
Feb 12, 2010
What an awesome post.

I’m going to keep this and use it as a template for my 30th birthday. Even the knicker flashing bit. I’m bound to do something shameful, it might just as well be that!

Happy Birthday.

9
Lori
Feb 12, 2010
at least you did have the tights on!

10
Home Sweet Sarah
Feb 12, 2010
This is exactly like my birthday (which is today), except that the sound of rustling wrapping paper caused me to get up before 6AM, not 11AM. Either way, though, the mani-pedi and the massage? Right there with ya.

11
Chelle
Feb 12, 2010
You are going to love your Rebel.
I have had mine for several years now and it is, hands down, the best present my husband ever gave me and, he gave me two beautiful children so, yeah...LOVE the Rebel.
P.S. It sounds like your birthday was perfect and you really will love your thirties :)

12
beyond
Feb 12, 2010
of course now i'm dying to know which nail colors are bridal and which are not.
my aunt once ran down a busy street after a woman who had her skirt tucked into her panties. the woman was so grateful, she almost kissed my aunt's feet.

13
Ris
Feb 12, 2010
I can never afford anything in Anthropologie, nor am I ever 100% sure I want to. Like yeah, that top is *kind* of cute and *maybe* I could pull it off. Oh, what's that you say? It's $75 and in no way work-appropriate so essentially I could only wear it on the weekend and when it's at least 80 degrees out? Alright then, that's a no.

14
Arina
Feb 12, 2010
Sounds like a lovely day, all around! (And I agree with you on Anthropologie. The quality never seems to live up to the price, which annoys me greatly about that store.)

15
Lori
Feb 12, 2010
Happy Belated Birthday! What a hilarious story. Better the undies showing then, say, something like toilet paper hanging out. (Which happened to someone I know) Yikes!

16
Amy --- Just A Titch
Feb 12, 2010
What a lovely birthday! Glad it was so wonderful.

P.S. I tucked my dress into my tights last week...except I was at work. And a co-worker had to tell me. At least I didn't walk into my classroom of 35 13-year-olds with my underwear showing. BUT STILL.

17
Chris
Feb 12, 2010
Ooooh...the Rebel. I bought myself the same camera last year for my 38th b-day and now every gift giving event is filled with ..oooh, I'd really love this lens or oooh, I need a new bag

18
HIp Hip Gin Gin
Feb 12, 2010
Sounds like you had a perfect birthday! I hope my 30th is that fabulous. Right down to the wellington boots which by the way are totally not dorky I have been coveting them forever as well since every time it rains in New England there is some sort of flood.
And hey, if flashing a bit of bum is the price one has to pay for the rest of the day being so fantastic, then sign my bum up!!

19
Chris
Feb 12, 2010
Firstly Happy Birthday(!), and I am glad you're not dwelling on that unfortunate dress-stuck-in-tights incident. And secondly- oh MAN am I jealous of your Rebel. That is what I have been coveting for years. YEARS. Enjoy!

20
Jennie
Feb 12, 2010
You've set a very high Birthday Bar that I'll aim for next year. Although Birthday Bar also sounds like the great name of a place that only serves desserts with candles while people sing to you.

21
Nothing But Bonfires
Feb 12, 2010
Jennie, I think you've just had a million dollar business idea.

22
Jill
Feb 12, 2010
1. Happy birthday! What a lovely post.
2. Have you had a sandwich at Ike's yet? They're insane. Onion rings, mozzarella sticks—on a sandwich? And oh, his dirty sauce! (Wait, that sounded extra dirty.) The lines are crazy but the wait is SO worth it.
3. The boots! I wanted the silver pair until I saw them live (a little too Tinman) so now I covet the red. And have you seen the sock inserts? Fabulous!

23
AnEmily
Feb 12, 2010
That's the same camera I got for my 39th birthday...er, over a year ago. I'm old. The camera is great-you'll love it! notmartha.com had a lot of great things to say about it too.

24
Allison
Feb 12, 2010
De-lurking to ask if anyone ever asks you if they want your life? Because I do. You have a lovely, beautiful life. And you seem very happy. All the best, from this rambling de-lurker!

25
Kelly
Feb 12, 2010
Yep, been to that Anthropologie and agree, it's huge and set up badly. I never get anything there either.

I love Specialty's HUGE chocolate chip cookies! Although where I work we order food from there constantly, so it can be very dangerous to have those cookies around me all the time.

Love the DSLR, perfect gift! I just bought myself (as a Christmas present to me) the Canon T1i and love it!

26
Valerie
Feb 12, 2010
Not sure if they would come in handy in San Fran, but did you know they also make fleece liner socks for the Hunter boots? I live in the midwest and got some so that I could wear my Hunter's in the snow without getting frostbite on my toes and they work great!

27
Laurie
Feb 13, 2010
My sister once walked 10 blocks through downtown Chicago before someone told her that her skirt was tucked into the back of her waistband. San Franciscans must be very friendly!

28
Melanie
Feb 14, 2010
Your day sounds delightful. I love reading about your life, even if I'm slightly jealous.

29
Sarah Ashley
Feb 16, 2010
Holly, I can't believe you are 30! You are in great shape & look younger than you really are. (I'm told the same too. I really think it will pay off one day when we're older) Where did you find those lovely earnings?

30
Kristabella
Feb 16, 2010
Sometimes I think "man, these crazy things only happen to me!" (see: crazy biker chasing me into a salon.)

And then I read your post and it's like straight out of a YM Say Anything column and then I realize that it is why I love you! Because you tell the internet these things! And crazy things happen to you too!

So happy you had a wonderful birthday my friend!

31
NothingButBonfires
Feb 16, 2010
Thank you, Sarah Ashley! Earrings are just H&M.

32
Sutswana
Feb 21, 2010
Reading this belatedly but I have to share: just a few days after your bday I had to take a towel to my daughter who had just finished her swim lesson at the community center pool. To do this I had to weave my way through the small crowd of parents on the bleacher things, descend the stairs to the pool area, walk the length of the pool, all this in front of the glass-wall observation deck above, and then all the way back again. My husband was bug-eyed when I got back, said, "Turn around, but don't do it obviously." (Wha??) So I did, and he calmly informed me I had a length of toilet paper flapping out the top of my jeans. Lovely.

Happy belated birthday, and congrats on finally crossing the perceived hurdle of turning 30.

33
annie
Feb 22, 2010
ONE: The last time I was in that anthropologie in the city I was nine months pregnant. OH YES I DO remember the walk from the fitting rooms to the entrance. I had to sit down and take a break half way. And then another break on the stairs.

TWO: When my husband and I were in Rome on our honeymoon we were eating dinner at this little cafe in the piazza navona. After using the (oh so tiny) restroom I was walking back outside when the old man bartender and the old men coffee drinkers kept saying to me "signorina! signorina!" which I simply ignored because I was on my HONEYMOON and I didn't care to deal with old italian men being, well, old italian men. A few minutes after sitting back down at our table it hit me: that bathroom was REALLY small. I was wearing A LOT of layers. There was a log of WIGGLING involved in getting said layers back in their proper place. Already knowing what I was going to find, I took my hand reached back to the waist of my jeans. Yup. A toilet paper tail. Lovely.

34
Lindsay
Apr 12, 2010
On a scale of 1-10, how much do you LOVE your Rebel? I want to splurge and get one, but can only do so in good conscience if I know it's a 9 or a 10 :)

35
Gorgonz
Jul 01, 2010
Good luck with your work and keep it up.

serving dish | vanity table

36
Brian
Mar 08, 2011
I honestly always wanted to get something like this for my birthday, but it seems I haven't reached that level of being so luck as you are.

However, I'm working hard to get there ;)

Brian

37
Ben Dover
Apr 17, 2012
kill yoursef before your next birthday please

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OUR DIY WEDDING
wedding photos by Erin Hearts CourtPHOTOS & DETAILS
OUR DIY HOME
PHOTOS & DETAILS
WHERE I'VE BEEN
TRAVEL POSTS BY LOCATION
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AdChoices | Advertise | Privacy
advertisingTravel Guides
Bad Decisions
Best Things Ever
Craftiness
Nothing But Bonfires
ABOUT
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FAVORITE READS
EMAIL ME

What I Did On My Birthday, The World's Longest Essay About Nothing
Posted: Feb 11, 2010
37
Comments
Before I shut up about it once and for all, I would like to tell you a little bit about my birthday. First of all, if you can swing it, I highly recommend taking the day off work for your birthday, particularly if your birthday is on a Monday. This way you can stay in bed until 11am, reading your new library book (Lorrie Moore's A Gate at the Stairs, very enjoyable so far), periodically cackling to yourself with self-important glee because NO MORNING MEETING FOR YOU HAHAHA. Well, unless that morning meeting is with your bed, your library book, and a flaky pain au chocolat. High five!

(Did I just confess to spending the first few hours of my 30th birthday reading a library book? There's a punchline to a joke in there somewhere, isn't there? My 21-year-old self would be apalled.)

The next item on my agenda was to shower, dress, and go and get a mani-pedi, something I hadn't done---I recalled, as I was sitting in the weird massage chair, suddenly having jittery flashbacks---since the day before my wedding. The mani-pedi the day before my wedding was, if you remember, at the evocatively-named Nails 2 U (no, nails to you, buddy!) and I have very little memory of it aside from a) wearing some very short shorts that I would not be able to squeeze my way into these days if you greased them with a stick of butter first, and b) holding up a color to my show my sister, having her say "I'm not sure if it's very bridal," having the nail salon owner go "Oh! Who's the bride?" and subsequently experiencing a very, very, very surreal out-of-body experience that involved me saying "Whoa. Me!"

This mani-pedi, needless to say, was far less fraught with existental crises, and I left for my next stop, which was meeting Sean at The Sentinel to pick up the world's best sandwiches---they're corned beef, but please don't let that put you off; I don't like corned beef either and these are INSANE---and then eat them in Yerba Buena Gardens, along with a brownie and a cookie from Specialty's (if you're coming to San Francisco soon, I hope you're taking notes. As you can see, I like to eat.)

After lunch, I had about a half hour to kill, so I wandered into Anthropologie, where I had a 15% off coupon they'd sent me as a reward for....being born in February, I guess? I don't know, something like that. I never shop in Anthropologie, mostly because I feel like everything is either artfully ripped or six kajillion dollars (or both), but I figured I would browse the sale racks and see if anything struck my fancy. I took a pile of dresses into the dressing room, half-heartedly considered one until I discovered that it was $128 on sale---and it wasn't anything fancy, just a cotton sundress, though I suppose the fact that it used to be $228 probably made it some warped sort of deal somehow---and then left twenty minutes later empty-handed.

Now I don't know if you've ever been to the Anthropologie in San Francisco, but it is multi-level and the changing rooms are pretty much as far from the exit as you can get: to walk from the changing rooms to the exit, in fact, you have to traverse practically the whole store, which includes a rather long climb up a staircase in the middle. This is important. Remember this for later. Because as I was making this trek from the changing rooms to the exit, I kept hearing this: "Excuse me! Excuse me!"

They can't be talking to me, I thought, and so I kept walking, and I'd just made it out of the store and onto the street, when I felt a hand clasp my shoulder. Am I about to be accused of SHOPLIFTING? I thought, my mind wandering to the many educational after-school specials I had seen on the subject (cough, Beverly Hills 90210, cough). I span around, expecting to be faced with a burly security guard and found instead a diminutive Asian girl who made an apologetic face. "I just wanted to tell you," she whispered, "that your dress is tucked into your tights at the back."

Yes, Internet, I cannot make this shit up. On my thirtieth birthday, I walked the length and breadth of Anthropologie WITH MY UNDERWEAR FULLY ON DISPLAY. Well, that's certainly a way to celebrate, isn't it?

But you know, I was mortified by this for about five seconds---I thanked the girl profusely for following me through the store to catch up with me, god knows what sort of view she must have endured to do that---but by the time I was a few blocks away from Anthropologie, I was actually chuckling quite mirthfully at the situation. Aha! I thought! This is because I am now thirty! I am mature and wise and I have ceased to care what people think of me anymore! It happened just like they said it would!

Good job, however, that my next stop was the spa---specifically, this spa, which, despite the fact that it plays Enya when you click on that link, was really quite delightful---because it took my mind entirely off the fact that I'd just flashed the entire clientele of Anthropologie and instead set it to far more coherent thoughts like aaaaaaaaaaaaaaahhhh and mmmmmmmmm and ooooooh. I had a groupon, you see---have you heard of Groupon? I'm obsessed with it---so I booked a massage as a special treat, and then took advantage of the fact that it was three o'clock on a Monday afternoon and I had nowhere else to be and spent an obscene amount of time in the steam room. My god, I love the steam room. I went in, like, three separate times. My skin looked fabulous afterwards, I'm telling you. If I'm ever rich enough, I'm going to install a steam room in my house and I will conduct all business from there, except maybe not anything that requires a) paper (it'll droop) and b) me to meet publicly with anyone (I'll be sweaty), though everything else apart from that will be fair game.

Anyway, after I finally left the locker room at the spa---they had a shower with ten shower heads, which didn't so much give one the impression of showering but rather of being caught in a tropical monsoon---I did a quick spot of shopping in Union Square (found a dress and some earrings) and then returned home, where it was time for champagne, and not just champagne, but also presents. Sean gave me an Arco lamp, which I have been coveting for years---I don't have a picture of it since it's currently sitting in three pieces on our living room floor, but it looks like this (PS: how much do you want that giant globe in the corner?)---and also some Hunter wellington boots, which might sound dorky to you, but which I have also been coveting for years, though particularly strongly for the last few weeks when the rain was coming down in San Francisco like a shower with ten showerheads.



Wait, what do you mean I'm supposed to take the tag off first?

I thought this was the end of the presents---it was certainly enough for me---but he had one more surprise up his sleeve, and when I show you this next photo, I think you will quite likely be able to feel my excitement LEAPING OUT OF THE COMPUTER AND CRACKLING ONTO YOUR SKIN, that's how pumped I was about it.



Yes, my friends, that is a new camera, the first DSLR I've ever owned. I think you can see that I like it.

The day ended with a delicious dinner at Chapeau!, which I would recommend you run to if you are ever in the San Francisco area and like steak, cheese, butter, and waiters with French accents, and I have to say, it was truly one of the most brilliant days I've had in a while.





I would also like to shut up, finally, about turning thirty, because for all my silly fretting and worrying---which your fantastic comments completely helped to eradicate, by the way---it really wasn't as huge a deal as I'd thought it would be. In fact, it really wasn't a big deal at all. Apart from that bit where I walked around with my dress tucked into my tights and my bum hanging out in a major urban retail store, of course. That part wasn't my favorite.

Lots more photos here, though thankfully none of that scene in Anthropologie. We're just going to pretend that never happened.

Filed Under: Me, Me, Me, Me, Me, The San Francisco Adventure
1
Connie
Feb 12, 2010
You make me smile. I'm glad you had a good birthday. Everyone should feel pampered on their birthday.

2
Isobel
Feb 12, 2010
Yep, turning 30 was fine. It was 31 that was horrible ;)

Glad you had such a good birthday - great camera!

3
Catherine
Feb 12, 2010
You make an excellent case for the Birthday Day Off. (Beats hiding in the printroom hoping no-one has remembered, lest there be a public serenade. Yeesh.)

Also, lovely haircut.

4
Kavita
Feb 12, 2010
Love the 'excuse me' story, and it was great reading all the details of your 30th birthday. Sounds absolutely perfect.

5
shan
Feb 12, 2010
Sounds like an absolutely amazing day, Holly, one that I want to try to recreate when it's my birthday again! Glad you had a great day!

6
Helen
Feb 12, 2010
Any day that starts with pain au chocolat and ends with chocolate souffle cake by way of champagne and Kir Royale is going to be good! By the way, I love how in the photo of you with the Veuve Cliquot box, Charlie is staring up at it like he's after a glass. You clearly have a cat with classy tastes.

7
Nicki
Feb 12, 2010
You are amazing! You have already discovered the secret to aging gracefully and you did it in only one day!

Remember the good, forget the bad.

See?

8
nku
Feb 12, 2010
What an awesome post.

I’m going to keep this and use it as a template for my 30th birthday. Even the knicker flashing bit. I’m bound to do something shameful, it might just as well be that!

Happy Birthday.

9
Lori
Feb 12, 2010
at least you did have the tights on!

10
Home Sweet Sarah
Feb 12, 2010
This is exactly like my birthday (which is today), except that the sound of rustling wrapping paper caused me to get up before 6AM, not 11AM. Either way, though, the mani-pedi and the massage? Right there with ya.

11
Chelle
Feb 12, 2010
You are going to love your Rebel.
I have had mine for several years now and it is, hands down, the best present my husband ever gave me and, he gave me two beautiful children so, yeah...LOVE the Rebel.
P.S. It sounds like your birthday was perfect and you really will love your thirties :)

12
beyond
Feb 12, 2010
of course now i'm dying to know which nail colors are bridal and which are not.
my aunt once ran down a busy street after a woman who had her skirt tucked into her panties. the woman was so grateful, she almost kissed my aunt's feet.

13
Ris
Feb 12, 2010
I can never afford anything in Anthropologie, nor am I ever 100% sure I want to. Like yeah, that top is *kind* of cute and *maybe* I could pull it off. Oh, what's that you say? It's $75 and in no way work-appropriate so essentially I could only wear it on the weekend and when it's at least 80 degrees out? Alright then, that's a no.

14
Arina
Feb 12, 2010
Sounds like a lovely day, all around! (And I agree with you on Anthropologie. The quality never seems to live up to the price, which annoys me greatly about that store.)

15
Lori
Feb 12, 2010
Happy Belated Birthday! What a hilarious story. Better the undies showing then, say, something like toilet paper hanging out. (Which happened to someone I know) Yikes!

16
Amy --- Just A Titch
Feb 12, 2010
What a lovely birthday! Glad it was so wonderful.

P.S. I tucked my dress into my tights last week...except I was at work. And a co-worker had to tell me. At least I didn't walk into my classroom of 35 13-year-olds with my underwear showing. BUT STILL.

17
Chris
Feb 12, 2010
Ooooh...the Rebel. I bought myself the same camera last year for my 38th b-day and now every gift giving event is filled with ..oooh, I'd really love this lens or oooh, I need a new bag

18
HIp Hip Gin Gin
Feb 12, 2010
Sounds like you had a perfect birthday! I hope my 30th is that fabulous. Right down to the wellington boots which by the way are totally not dorky I have been coveting them forever as well since every time it rains in New England there is some sort of flood.
And hey, if flashing a bit of bum is the price one has to pay for the rest of the day being so fantastic, then sign my bum up!!

19
Chris
Feb 12, 2010
Firstly Happy Birthday(!), and I am glad you're not dwelling on that unfortunate dress-stuck-in-tights incident. And secondly- oh MAN am I jealous of your Rebel. That is what I have been coveting for years. YEARS. Enjoy!

20
Jennie
Feb 12, 2010
You've set a very high Birthday Bar that I'll aim for next year. Although Birthday Bar also sounds like the great name of a place that only serves desserts with candles while people sing to you.

21
Nothing But Bonfires
Feb 12, 2010
Jennie, I think you've just had a million dollar business idea.

22
Jill
Feb 12, 2010
1. Happy birthday! What a lovely post.
2. Have you had a sandwich at Ike's yet? They're insane. Onion rings, mozzarella sticks—on a sandwich? And oh, his dirty sauce! (Wait, that sounded extra dirty.) The lines are crazy but the wait is SO worth it.
3. The boots! I wanted the silver pair until I saw them live (a little too Tinman) so now I covet the red. And have you seen the sock inserts? Fabulous!

23
AnEmily
Feb 12, 2010
That's the same camera I got for my 39th birthday...er, over a year ago. I'm old. The camera is great-you'll love it! notmartha.com had a lot of great things to say about it too.

24
Allison
Feb 12, 2010
De-lurking to ask if anyone ever asks you if they want your life? Because I do. You have a lovely, beautiful life. And you seem very happy. All the best, from this rambling de-lurker!

25
Kelly
Feb 12, 2010
Yep, been to that Anthropologie and agree, it's huge and set up badly. I never get anything there either.

I love Specialty's HUGE chocolate chip cookies! Although where I work we order food from there constantly, so it can be very dangerous to have those cookies around me all the time.

Love the DSLR, perfect gift! I just bought myself (as a Christmas present to me) the Canon T1i and love it!

26
Valerie
Feb 12, 2010
Not sure if they would come in handy in San Fran, but did you know they also make fleece liner socks for the Hunter boots? I live in the midwest and got some so that I could wear my Hunter's in the snow without getting frostbite on my toes and they work great!

27
Laurie
Feb 13, 2010
My sister once walked 10 blocks through downtown Chicago before someone told her that her skirt was tucked into the back of her waistband. San Franciscans must be very friendly!

28
Melanie
Feb 14, 2010
Your day sounds delightful. I love reading about your life, even if I'm slightly jealous.

29
Sarah Ashley
Feb 16, 2010
Holly, I can't believe you are 30! You are in great shape & look younger than you really are. (I'm told the same too. I really think it will pay off one day when we're older) Where did you find those lovely earnings?

30
Kristabella
Feb 16, 2010
Sometimes I think "man, these crazy things only happen to me!" (see: crazy biker chasing me into a salon.)

And then I read your post and it's like straight out of a YM Say Anything column and then I realize that it is why I love you! Because you tell the internet these things! And crazy things happen to you too!

So happy you had a wonderful birthday my friend!

31
NothingButBonfires
Feb 16, 2010
Thank you, Sarah Ashley! Earrings are just H&M.

32
Sutswana
Feb 21, 2010
Reading this belatedly but I have to share: just a few days after your bday I had to take a towel to my daughter who had just finished her swim lesson at the community center pool. To do this I had to weave my way through the small crowd of parents on the bleacher things, descend the stairs to the pool area, walk the length of the pool, all this in front of the glass-wall observation deck above, and then all the way back again. My husband was bug-eyed when I got back, said, "Turn around, but don't do it obviously." (Wha??) So I did, and he calmly informed me I had a length of toilet paper flapping out the top of my jeans. Lovely.

Happy belated birthday, and congrats on finally crossing the perceived hurdle of turning 30.

33
annie
Feb 22, 2010
ONE: The last time I was in that anthropologie in the city I was nine months pregnant. OH YES I DO remember the walk from the fitting rooms to the entrance. I had to sit down and take a break half way. And then another break on the stairs.

TWO: When my husband and I were in Rome on our honeymoon we were eating dinner at this little cafe in the piazza navona. After using the (oh so tiny) restroom I was walking back outside when the old man bartender and the old men coffee drinkers kept saying to me "signorina! signorina!" which I simply ignored because I was on my HONEYMOON and I didn't care to deal with old italian men being, well, old italian men. A few minutes after sitting back down at our table it hit me: that bathroom was REALLY small. I was wearing A LOT of layers. There was a log of WIGGLING involved in getting said layers back in their proper place. Already knowing what I was going to find, I took my hand reached back to the waist of my jeans. Yup. A toilet paper tail. Lovely.

34
Lindsay
Apr 12, 2010
On a scale of 1-10, how much do you LOVE your Rebel? I want to splurge and get one, but can only do so in good conscience if I know it's a 9 or a 10 :)

35
Gorgonz
Jul 01, 2010
Good luck with your work and keep it up.

serving dish | vanity table

36
Brian
Mar 08, 2011
I honestly always wanted to get something like this for my birthday, but it seems I haven't reached that level of being so luck as you are.

However, I'm working hard to get there ;)

Brian

37
Ben Dover
Apr 17, 2012
kill yoursef before your next birthday please

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Re: WOOO YVETHE SANTIAGO

Postby lazyakihiro » Mon Nov 17, 2014 11:59 am

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What I Did On My Birthday, The World's Longest Essay About Nothing
Posted: Feb 11, 2010
37
Comments
Before I shut up about it once and for all, I would like to tell you a little bit about my birthday. First of all, if you can swing it, I highly recommend taking the day off work for your birthday, particularly if your birthday is on a Monday. This way you can stay in bed until 11am, reading your new library book (Lorrie Moore's A Gate at the Stairs, very enjoyable so far), periodically cackling to yourself with self-important glee because NO MORNING MEETING FOR YOU HAHAHA. Well, unless that morning meeting is with your bed, your library book, and a flaky pain au chocolat. High five!

(Did I just confess to spending the first few hours of my 30th birthday reading a library book? There's a punchline to a joke in there somewhere, isn't there? My 21-year-old self would be apalled.)

The next item on my agenda was to shower, dress, and go and get a mani-pedi, something I hadn't done---I recalled, as I was sitting in the weird massage chair, suddenly having jittery flashbacks---since the day before my wedding. The mani-pedi the day before my wedding was, if you remember, at the evocatively-named Nails 2 U (no, nails to you, buddy!) and I have very little memory of it aside from a) wearing some very short shorts that I would not be able to squeeze my way into these days if you greased them with a stick of butter first, and b) holding up a color to my show my sister, having her say "I'm not sure if it's very bridal," having the nail salon owner go "Oh! Who's the bride?" and subsequently experiencing a very, very, very surreal out-of-body experience that involved me saying "Whoa. Me!"

This mani-pedi, needless to say, was far less fraught with existental crises, and I left for my next stop, which was meeting Sean at The Sentinel to pick up the world's best sandwiches---they're corned beef, but please don't let that put you off; I don't like corned beef either and these are INSANE---and then eat them in Yerba Buena Gardens, along with a brownie and a cookie from Specialty's (if you're coming to San Francisco soon, I hope you're taking notes. As you can see, I like to eat.)

After lunch, I had about a half hour to kill, so I wandered into Anthropologie, where I had a 15% off coupon they'd sent me as a reward for....being born in February, I guess? I don't know, something like that. I never shop in Anthropologie, mostly because I feel like everything is either artfully ripped or six kajillion dollars (or both), but I figured I would browse the sale racks and see if anything struck my fancy. I took a pile of dresses into the dressing room, half-heartedly considered one until I discovered that it was $128 on sale---and it wasn't anything fancy, just a cotton sundress, though I suppose the fact that it used to be $228 probably made it some warped sort of deal somehow---and then left twenty minutes later empty-handed.

Now I don't know if you've ever been to the Anthropologie in San Francisco, but it is multi-level and the changing rooms are pretty much as far from the exit as you can get: to walk from the changing rooms to the exit, in fact, you have to traverse practically the whole store, which includes a rather long climb up a staircase in the middle. This is important. Remember this for later. Because as I was making this trek from the changing rooms to the exit, I kept hearing this: "Excuse me! Excuse me!"

They can't be talking to me, I thought, and so I kept walking, and I'd just made it out of the store and onto the street, when I felt a hand clasp my shoulder. Am I about to be accused of SHOPLIFTING? I thought, my mind wandering to the many educational after-school specials I had seen on the subject (cough, Beverly Hills 90210, cough). I span around, expecting to be faced with a burly security guard and found instead a diminutive Asian girl who made an apologetic face. "I just wanted to tell you," she whispered, "that your dress is tucked into your tights at the back."

Yes, Internet, I cannot make this shit up. On my thirtieth birthday, I walked the length and breadth of Anthropologie WITH MY UNDERWEAR FULLY ON DISPLAY. Well, that's certainly a way to celebrate, isn't it?

But you know, I was mortified by this for about five seconds---I thanked the girl profusely for following me through the store to catch up with me, god knows what sort of view she must have endured to do that---but by the time I was a few blocks away from Anthropologie, I was actually chuckling quite mirthfully at the situation. Aha! I thought! This is because I am now thirty! I am mature and wise and I have ceased to care what people think of me anymore! It happened just like they said it would!

Good job, however, that my next stop was the spa---specifically, this spa, which, despite the fact that it plays Enya when you click on that link, was really quite delightful---because it took my mind entirely off the fact that I'd just flashed the entire clientele of Anthropologie and instead set it to far more coherent thoughts like aaaaaaaaaaaaaaahhhh and mmmmmmmmm and ooooooh. I had a groupon, you see---have you heard of Groupon? I'm obsessed with it---so I booked a massage as a special treat, and then took advantage of the fact that it was three o'clock on a Monday afternoon and I had nowhere else to be and spent an obscene amount of time in the steam room. My god, I love the steam room. I went in, like, three separate times. My skin looked fabulous afterwards, I'm telling you. If I'm ever rich enough, I'm going to install a steam room in my house and I will conduct all business from there, except maybe not anything that requires a) paper (it'll droop) and b) me to meet publicly with anyone (I'll be sweaty), though everything else apart from that will be fair game.

Anyway, after I finally left the locker room at the spa---they had a shower with ten shower heads, which didn't so much give one the impression of showering but rather of being caught in a tropical monsoon---I did a quick spot of shopping in Union Square (found a dress and some earrings) and then returned home, where it was time for champagne, and not just champagne, but also presents. Sean gave me an Arco lamp, which I have been coveting for years---I don't have a picture of it since it's currently sitting in three pieces on our living room floor, but it looks like this (PS: how much do you want that giant globe in the corner?)---and also some Hunter wellington boots, which might sound dorky to you, but which I have also been coveting for years, though particularly strongly for the last few weeks when the rain was coming down in San Francisco like a shower with ten showerheads.



Wait, what do you mean I'm supposed to take the tag off first?

I thought this was the end of the presents---it was certainly enough for me---but he had one more surprise up his sleeve, and when I show you this next photo, I think you will quite likely be able to feel my excitement LEAPING OUT OF THE COMPUTER AND CRACKLING ONTO YOUR SKIN, that's how pumped I was about it.



Yes, my friends, that is a new camera, the first DSLR I've ever owned. I think you can see that I like it.

The day ended with a delicious dinner at Chapeau!, which I would recommend you run to if you are ever in the San Francisco area and like steak, cheese, butter, and waiters with French accents, and I have to say, it was truly one of the most brilliant days I've had in a while.





I would also like to shut up, finally, about turning thirty, because for all my silly fretting and worrying---which your fantastic comments completely helped to eradicate, by the way---it really wasn't as huge a deal as I'd thought it would be. In fact, it really wasn't a big deal at all. Apart from that bit where I walked around with my dress tucked into my tights and my bum hanging out in a major urban retail store, of course. That part wasn't my favorite.

Lots more photos here, though thankfully none of that scene in Anthropologie. We're just going to pretend that never happened.

Filed Under: Me, Me, Me, Me, Me, The San Francisco Adventure
1
Connie
Feb 12, 2010
You make me smile. I'm glad you had a good birthday. Everyone should feel pampered on their birthday.

2
Isobel
Feb 12, 2010
Yep, turning 30 was fine. It was 31 that was horrible ;)

Glad you had such a good birthday - great camera!

3
Catherine
Feb 12, 2010
You make an excellent case for the Birthday Day Off. (Beats hiding in the printroom hoping no-one has remembered, lest there be a public serenade. Yeesh.)

Also, lovely haircut.

4
Kavita
Feb 12, 2010
Love the 'excuse me' story, and it was great reading all the details of your 30th birthday. Sounds absolutely perfect.

5
shan
Feb 12, 2010
Sounds like an absolutely amazing day, Holly, one that I want to try to recreate when it's my birthday again! Glad you had a great day!

6
Helen
Feb 12, 2010
Any day that starts with pain au chocolat and ends with chocolate souffle cake by way of champagne and Kir Royale is going to be good! By the way, I love how in the photo of you with the Veuve Cliquot box, Charlie is staring up at it like he's after a glass. You clearly have a cat with classy tastes.

7
Nicki
Feb 12, 2010
You are amazing! You have already discovered the secret to aging gracefully and you did it in only one day!

Remember the good, forget the bad.

See?

8
nku
Feb 12, 2010
What an awesome post.

I’m going to keep this and use it as a template for my 30th birthday. Even the knicker flashing bit. I’m bound to do something shameful, it might just as well be that!

Happy Birthday.

9
Lori
Feb 12, 2010
at least you did have the tights on!

10
Home Sweet Sarah
Feb 12, 2010
This is exactly like my birthday (which is today), except that the sound of rustling wrapping paper caused me to get up before 6AM, not 11AM. Either way, though, the mani-pedi and the massage? Right there with ya.

11
Chelle
Feb 12, 2010
You are going to love your Rebel.
I have had mine for several years now and it is, hands down, the best present my husband ever gave me and, he gave me two beautiful children so, yeah...LOVE the Rebel.
P.S. It sounds like your birthday was perfect and you really will love your thirties :)

12
beyond
Feb 12, 2010
of course now i'm dying to know which nail colors are bridal and which are not.
my aunt once ran down a busy street after a woman who had her skirt tucked into her panties. the woman was so grateful, she almost kissed my aunt's feet.

13
Ris
Feb 12, 2010
I can never afford anything in Anthropologie, nor am I ever 100% sure I want to. Like yeah, that top is *kind* of cute and *maybe* I could pull it off. Oh, what's that you say? It's $75 and in no way work-appropriate so essentially I could only wear it on the weekend and when it's at least 80 degrees out? Alright then, that's a no.

14
Arina
Feb 12, 2010
Sounds like a lovely day, all around! (And I agree with you on Anthropologie. The quality never seems to live up to the price, which annoys me greatly about that store.)

15
Lori
Feb 12, 2010
Happy Belated Birthday! What a hilarious story. Better the undies showing then, say, something like toilet paper hanging out. (Which happened to someone I know) Yikes!

16
Amy --- Just A Titch
Feb 12, 2010
What a lovely birthday! Glad it was so wonderful.

P.S. I tucked my dress into my tights last week...except I was at work. And a co-worker had to tell me. At least I didn't walk into my classroom of 35 13-year-olds with my underwear showing. BUT STILL.

17
Chris
Feb 12, 2010
Ooooh...the Rebel. I bought myself the same camera last year for my 38th b-day and now every gift giving event is filled with ..oooh, I'd really love this lens or oooh, I need a new bag

18
HIp Hip Gin Gin
Feb 12, 2010
Sounds like you had a perfect birthday! I hope my 30th is that fabulous. Right down to the wellington boots which by the way are totally not dorky I have been coveting them forever as well since every time it rains in New England there is some sort of flood.
And hey, if flashing a bit of bum is the price one has to pay for the rest of the day being so fantastic, then sign my bum up!!

19
Chris
Feb 12, 2010
Firstly Happy Birthday(!), and I am glad you're not dwelling on that unfortunate dress-stuck-in-tights incident. And secondly- oh MAN am I jealous of your Rebel. That is what I have been coveting for years. YEARS. Enjoy!

20
Jennie
Feb 12, 2010
You've set a very high Birthday Bar that I'll aim for next year. Although Birthday Bar also sounds like the great name of a place that only serves desserts with candles while people sing to you.

21
Nothing But Bonfires
Feb 12, 2010
Jennie, I think you've just had a million dollar business idea.

22
Jill
Feb 12, 2010
1. Happy birthday! What a lovely post.
2. Have you had a sandwich at Ike's yet? They're insane. Onion rings, mozzarella sticks—on a sandwich? And oh, his dirty sauce! (Wait, that sounded extra dirty.) The lines are crazy but the wait is SO worth it.
3. The boots! I wanted the silver pair until I saw them live (a little too Tinman) so now I covet the red. And have you seen the sock inserts? Fabulous!

23
AnEmily
Feb 12, 2010
That's the same camera I got for my 39th birthday...er, over a year ago. I'm old. The camera is great-you'll love it! notmartha.com had a lot of great things to say about it too.

24
Allison
Feb 12, 2010
De-lurking to ask if anyone ever asks you if they want your life? Because I do. You have a lovely, beautiful life. And you seem very happy. All the best, from this rambling de-lurker!

25
Kelly
Feb 12, 2010
Yep, been to that Anthropologie and agree, it's huge and set up badly. I never get anything there either.

I love Specialty's HUGE chocolate chip cookies! Although where I work we order food from there constantly, so it can be very dangerous to have those cookies around me all the time.

Love the DSLR, perfect gift! I just bought myself (as a Christmas present to me) the Canon T1i and love it!

26
Valerie
Feb 12, 2010
Not sure if they would come in handy in San Fran, but did you know they also make fleece liner socks for the Hunter boots? I live in the midwest and got some so that I could wear my Hunter's in the snow without getting frostbite on my toes and they work great!

27
Laurie
Feb 13, 2010
My sister once walked 10 blocks through downtown Chicago before someone told her that her skirt was tucked into the back of her waistband. San Franciscans must be very friendly!

28
Melanie
Feb 14, 2010
Your day sounds delightful. I love reading about your life, even if I'm slightly jealous.

29
Sarah Ashley
Feb 16, 2010
Holly, I can't believe you are 30! You are in great shape & look younger than you really are. (I'm told the same too. I really think it will pay off one day when we're older) Where did you find those lovely earnings?

30
Kristabella
Feb 16, 2010
Sometimes I think "man, these crazy things only happen to me!" (see: crazy biker chasing me into a salon.)

And then I read your post and it's like straight out of a YM Say Anything column and then I realize that it is why I love you! Because you tell the internet these things! And crazy things happen to you too!

So happy you had a wonderful birthday my friend!

31
NothingButBonfires
Feb 16, 2010
Thank you, Sarah Ashley! Earrings are just H&M.

32
Sutswana
Feb 21, 2010
Reading this belatedly but I have to share: just a few days after your bday I had to take a towel to my daughter who had just finished her swim lesson at the community center pool. To do this I had to weave my way through the small crowd of parents on the bleacher things, descend the stairs to the pool area, walk the length of the pool, all this in front of the glass-wall observation deck above, and then all the way back again. My husband was bug-eyed when I got back, said, "Turn around, but don't do it obviously." (Wha??) So I did, and he calmly informed me I had a length of toilet paper flapping out the top of my jeans. Lovely.

Happy belated birthday, and congrats on finally crossing the perceived hurdle of turning 30.

33
annie
Feb 22, 2010
ONE: The last time I was in that anthropologie in the city I was nine months pregnant. OH YES I DO remember the walk from the fitting rooms to the entrance. I had to sit down and take a break half way. And then another break on the stairs.

TWO: When my husband and I were in Rome on our honeymoon we were eating dinner at this little cafe in the piazza navona. After using the (oh so tiny) restroom I was walking back outside when the old man bartender and the old men coffee drinkers kept saying to me "signorina! signorina!" which I simply ignored because I was on my HONEYMOON and I didn't care to deal with old italian men being, well, old italian men. A few minutes after sitting back down at our table it hit me: that bathroom was REALLY small. I was wearing A LOT of layers. There was a log of WIGGLING involved in getting said layers back in their proper place. Already knowing what I was going to find, I took my hand reached back to the waist of my jeans. Yup. A toilet paper tail. Lovely.

34
Lindsay
Apr 12, 2010
On a scale of 1-10, how much do you LOVE your Rebel? I want to splurge and get one, but can only do so in good conscience if I know it's a 9 or a 10 :)

35
Gorgonz
Jul 01, 2010
Good luck with your work and keep it up.

serving dish | vanity table

36
Brian
Mar 08, 2011
I honestly always wanted to get something like this for my birthday, but it seems I haven't reached that level of being so luck as you are.

However, I'm working hard to get there ;)

Brian

37
Ben Dover
Apr 17, 2012
kill yoursef before your next birthday please

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What I Did On My Birthday, The World's Longest Essay About Nothing
Posted: Feb 11, 2010
37
Comments
Before I shut up about it once and for all, I would like to tell you a little bit about my birthday. First of all, if you can swing it, I highly recommend taking the day off work for your birthday, particularly if your birthday is on a Monday. This way you can stay in bed until 11am, reading your new library book (Lorrie Moore's A Gate at the Stairs, very enjoyable so far), periodically cackling to yourself with self-important glee because NO MORNING MEETING FOR YOU HAHAHA. Well, unless that morning meeting is with your bed, your library book, and a flaky pain au chocolat. High five!

(Did I just confess to spending the first few hours of my 30th birthday reading a library book? There's a punchline to a joke in there somewhere, isn't there? My 21-year-old self would be apalled.)

The next item on my agenda was to shower, dress, and go and get a mani-pedi, something I hadn't done---I recalled, as I was sitting in the weird massage chair, suddenly having jittery flashbacks---since the day before my wedding. The mani-pedi the day before my wedding was, if you remember, at the evocatively-named Nails 2 U (no, nails to you, buddy!) and I have very little memory of it aside from a) wearing some very short shorts that I would not be able to squeeze my way into these days if you greased them with a stick of butter first, and b) holding up a color to my show my sister, having her say "I'm not sure if it's very bridal," having the nail salon owner go "Oh! Who's the bride?" and subsequently experiencing a very, very, very surreal out-of-body experience that involved me saying "Whoa. Me!"

This mani-pedi, needless to say, was far less fraught with existental crises, and I left for my next stop, which was meeting Sean at The Sentinel to pick up the world's best sandwiches---they're corned beef, but please don't let that put you off; I don't like corned beef either and these are INSANE---and then eat them in Yerba Buena Gardens, along with a brownie and a cookie from Specialty's (if you're coming to San Francisco soon, I hope you're taking notes. As you can see, I like to eat.)

After lunch, I had about a half hour to kill, so I wandered into Anthropologie, where I had a 15% off coupon they'd sent me as a reward for....being born in February, I guess? I don't know, something like that. I never shop in Anthropologie, mostly because I feel like everything is either artfully ripped or six kajillion dollars (or both), but I figured I would browse the sale racks and see if anything struck my fancy. I took a pile of dresses into the dressing room, half-heartedly considered one until I discovered that it was $128 on sale---and it wasn't anything fancy, just a cotton sundress, though I suppose the fact that it used to be $228 probably made it some warped sort of deal somehow---and then left twenty minutes later empty-handed.

Now I don't know if you've ever been to the Anthropologie in San Francisco, but it is multi-level and the changing rooms are pretty much as far from the exit as you can get: to walk from the changing rooms to the exit, in fact, you have to traverse practically the whole store, which includes a rather long climb up a staircase in the middle. This is important. Remember this for later. Because as I was making this trek from the changing rooms to the exit, I kept hearing this: "Excuse me! Excuse me!"

They can't be talking to me, I thought, and so I kept walking, and I'd just made it out of the store and onto the street, when I felt a hand clasp my shoulder. Am I about to be accused of SHOPLIFTING? I thought, my mind wandering to the many educational after-school specials I had seen on the subject (cough, Beverly Hills 90210, cough). I span around, expecting to be faced with a burly security guard and found instead a diminutive Asian girl who made an apologetic face. "I just wanted to tell you," she whispered, "that your dress is tucked into your tights at the back."

Yes, Internet, I cannot make this shit up. On my thirtieth birthday, I walked the length and breadth of Anthropologie WITH MY UNDERWEAR FULLY ON DISPLAY. Well, that's certainly a way to celebrate, isn't it?

But you know, I was mortified by this for about five seconds---I thanked the girl profusely for following me through the store to catch up with me, god knows what sort of view she must have endured to do that---but by the time I was a few blocks away from Anthropologie, I was actually chuckling quite mirthfully at the situation. Aha! I thought! This is because I am now thirty! I am mature and wise and I have ceased to care what people think of me anymore! It happened just like they said it would!

Good job, however, that my next stop was the spa---specifically, this spa, which, despite the fact that it plays Enya when you click on that link, was really quite delightful---because it took my mind entirely off the fact that I'd just flashed the entire clientele of Anthropologie and instead set it to far more coherent thoughts like aaaaaaaaaaaaaaahhhh and mmmmmmmmm and ooooooh. I had a groupon, you see---have you heard of Groupon? I'm obsessed with it---so I booked a massage as a special treat, and then took advantage of the fact that it was three o'clock on a Monday afternoon and I had nowhere else to be and spent an obscene amount of time in the steam room. My god, I love the steam room. I went in, like, three separate times. My skin looked fabulous afterwards, I'm telling you. If I'm ever rich enough, I'm going to install a steam room in my house and I will conduct all business from there, except maybe not anything that requires a) paper (it'll droop) and b) me to meet publicly with anyone (I'll be sweaty), though everything else apart from that will be fair game.

Anyway, after I finally left the locker room at the spa---they had a shower with ten shower heads, which didn't so much give one the impression of showering but rather of being caught in a tropical monsoon---I did a quick spot of shopping in Union Square (found a dress and some earrings) and then returned home, where it was time for champagne, and not just champagne, but also presents. Sean gave me an Arco lamp, which I have been coveting for years---I don't have a picture of it since it's currently sitting in three pieces on our living room floor, but it looks like this (PS: how much do you want that giant globe in the corner?)---and also some Hunter wellington boots, which might sound dorky to you, but which I have also been coveting for years, though particularly strongly for the last few weeks when the rain was coming down in San Francisco like a shower with ten showerheads.



Wait, what do you mean I'm supposed to take the tag off first?

I thought this was the end of the presents---it was certainly enough for me---but he had one more surprise up his sleeve, and when I show you this next photo, I think you will quite likely be able to feel my excitement LEAPING OUT OF THE COMPUTER AND CRACKLING ONTO YOUR SKIN, that's how pumped I was about it.



Yes, my friends, that is a new camera, the first DSLR I've ever owned. I think you can see that I like it.

The day ended with a delicious dinner at Chapeau!, which I would recommend you run to if you are ever in the San Francisco area and like steak, cheese, butter, and waiters with French accents, and I have to say, it was truly one of the most brilliant days I've had in a while.





I would also like to shut up, finally, about turning thirty, because for all my silly fretting and worrying---which your fantastic comments completely helped to eradicate, by the way---it really wasn't as huge a deal as I'd thought it would be. In fact, it really wasn't a big deal at all. Apart from that bit where I walked around with my dress tucked into my tights and my bum hanging out in a major urban retail store, of course. That part wasn't my favorite.

Lots more photos here, though thankfully none of that scene in Anthropologie. We're just going to pretend that never happened.

Filed Under: Me, Me, Me, Me, Me, The San Francisco Adventure
1
Connie
Feb 12, 2010
You make me smile. I'm glad you had a good birthday. Everyone should feel pampered on their birthday.

2
Isobel
Feb 12, 2010
Yep, turning 30 was fine. It was 31 that was horrible ;)

Glad you had such a good birthday - great camera!

3
Catherine
Feb 12, 2010
You make an excellent case for the Birthday Day Off. (Beats hiding in the printroom hoping no-one has remembered, lest there be a public serenade. Yeesh.)

Also, lovely haircut.

4
Kavita
Feb 12, 2010
Love the 'excuse me' story, and it was great reading all the details of your 30th birthday. Sounds absolutely perfect.

5
shan
Feb 12, 2010
Sounds like an absolutely amazing day, Holly, one that I want to try to recreate when it's my birthday again! Glad you had a great day!

6
Helen
Feb 12, 2010
Any day that starts with pain au chocolat and ends with chocolate souffle cake by way of champagne and Kir Royale is going to be good! By the way, I love how in the photo of you with the Veuve Cliquot box, Charlie is staring up at it like he's after a glass. You clearly have a cat with classy tastes.

7
Nicki
Feb 12, 2010
You are amazing! You have already discovered the secret to aging gracefully and you did it in only one day!

Remember the good, forget the bad.

See?

8
nku
Feb 12, 2010
What an awesome post.

I’m going to keep this and use it as a template for my 30th birthday. Even the knicker flashing bit. I’m bound to do something shameful, it might just as well be that!

Happy Birthday.

9
Lori
Feb 12, 2010
at least you did have the tights on!

10
Home Sweet Sarah
Feb 12, 2010
This is exactly like my birthday (which is today), except that the sound of rustling wrapping paper caused me to get up before 6AM, not 11AM. Either way, though, the mani-pedi and the massage? Right there with ya.

11
Chelle
Feb 12, 2010
You are going to love your Rebel.
I have had mine for several years now and it is, hands down, the best present my husband ever gave me and, he gave me two beautiful children so, yeah...LOVE the Rebel.
P.S. It sounds like your birthday was perfect and you really will love your thirties :)

12
beyond
Feb 12, 2010
of course now i'm dying to know which nail colors are bridal and which are not.
my aunt once ran down a busy street after a woman who had her skirt tucked into her panties. the woman was so grateful, she almost kissed my aunt's feet.

13
Ris
Feb 12, 2010
I can never afford anything in Anthropologie, nor am I ever 100% sure I want to. Like yeah, that top is *kind* of cute and *maybe* I could pull it off. Oh, what's that you say? It's $75 and in no way work-appropriate so essentially I could only wear it on the weekend and when it's at least 80 degrees out? Alright then, that's a no.

14
Arina
Feb 12, 2010
Sounds like a lovely day, all around! (And I agree with you on Anthropologie. The quality never seems to live up to the price, which annoys me greatly about that store.)

15
Lori
Feb 12, 2010
Happy Belated Birthday! What a hilarious story. Better the undies showing then, say, something like toilet paper hanging out. (Which happened to someone I know) Yikes!

16
Amy --- Just A Titch
Feb 12, 2010
What a lovely birthday! Glad it was so wonderful.

P.S. I tucked my dress into my tights last week...except I was at work. And a co-worker had to tell me. At least I didn't walk into my classroom of 35 13-year-olds with my underwear showing. BUT STILL.

17
Chris
Feb 12, 2010
Ooooh...the Rebel. I bought myself the same camera last year for my 38th b-day and now every gift giving event is filled with ..oooh, I'd really love this lens or oooh, I need a new bag

18
HIp Hip Gin Gin
Feb 12, 2010
Sounds like you had a perfect birthday! I hope my 30th is that fabulous. Right down to the wellington boots which by the way are totally not dorky I have been coveting them forever as well since every time it rains in New England there is some sort of flood.
And hey, if flashing a bit of bum is the price one has to pay for the rest of the day being so fantastic, then sign my bum up!!

19
Chris
Feb 12, 2010
Firstly Happy Birthday(!), and I am glad you're not dwelling on that unfortunate dress-stuck-in-tights incident. And secondly- oh MAN am I jealous of your Rebel. That is what I have been coveting for years. YEARS. Enjoy!

20
Jennie
Feb 12, 2010
You've set a very high Birthday Bar that I'll aim for next year. Although Birthday Bar also sounds like the great name of a place that only serves desserts with candles while people sing to you.

21
Nothing But Bonfires
Feb 12, 2010
Jennie, I think you've just had a million dollar business idea.

22
Jill
Feb 12, 2010
1. Happy birthday! What a lovely post.
2. Have you had a sandwich at Ike's yet? They're insane. Onion rings, mozzarella sticks—on a sandwich? And oh, his dirty sauce! (Wait, that sounded extra dirty.) The lines are crazy but the wait is SO worth it.
3. The boots! I wanted the silver pair until I saw them live (a little too Tinman) so now I covet the red. And have you seen the sock inserts? Fabulous!

23
AnEmily
Feb 12, 2010
That's the same camera I got for my 39th birthday...er, over a year ago. I'm old. The camera is great-you'll love it! notmartha.com had a lot of great things to say about it too.

24
Allison
Feb 12, 2010
De-lurking to ask if anyone ever asks you if they want your life? Because I do. You have a lovely, beautiful life. And you seem very happy. All the best, from this rambling de-lurker!

25
Kelly
Feb 12, 2010
Yep, been to that Anthropologie and agree, it's huge and set up badly. I never get anything there either.

I love Specialty's HUGE chocolate chip cookies! Although where I work we order food from there constantly, so it can be very dangerous to have those cookies around me all the time.

Love the DSLR, perfect gift! I just bought myself (as a Christmas present to me) the Canon T1i and love it!

26
Valerie
Feb 12, 2010
Not sure if they would come in handy in San Fran, but did you know they also make fleece liner socks for the Hunter boots? I live in the midwest and got some so that I could wear my Hunter's in the snow without getting frostbite on my toes and they work great!

27
Laurie
Feb 13, 2010
My sister once walked 10 blocks through downtown Chicago before someone told her that her skirt was tucked into the back of her waistband. San Franciscans must be very friendly!

28
Melanie
Feb 14, 2010
Your day sounds delightful. I love reading about your life, even if I'm slightly jealous.

29
Sarah Ashley
Feb 16, 2010
Holly, I can't believe you are 30! You are in great shape & look younger than you really are. (I'm told the same too. I really think it will pay off one day when we're older) Where did you find those lovely earnings?

30
Kristabella
Feb 16, 2010
Sometimes I think "man, these crazy things only happen to me!" (see: crazy biker chasing me into a salon.)

And then I read your post and it's like straight out of a YM Say Anything column and then I realize that it is why I love you! Because you tell the internet these things! And crazy things happen to you too!

So happy you had a wonderful birthday my friend!

31
NothingButBonfires
Feb 16, 2010
Thank you, Sarah Ashley! Earrings are just H&M.

32
Sutswana
Feb 21, 2010
Reading this belatedly but I have to share: just a few days after your bday I had to take a towel to my daughter who had just finished her swim lesson at the community center pool. To do this I had to weave my way through the small crowd of parents on the bleacher things, descend the stairs to the pool area, walk the length of the pool, all this in front of the glass-wall observation deck above, and then all the way back again. My husband was bug-eyed when I got back, said, "Turn around, but don't do it obviously." (Wha??) So I did, and he calmly informed me I had a length of toilet paper flapping out the top of my jeans. Lovely.

Happy belated birthday, and congrats on finally crossing the perceived hurdle of turning 30.

33
annie
Feb 22, 2010
ONE: The last time I was in that anthropologie in the city I was nine months pregnant. OH YES I DO remember the walk from the fitting rooms to the entrance. I had to sit down and take a break half way. And then another break on the stairs.

TWO: When my husband and I were in Rome on our honeymoon we were eating dinner at this little cafe in the piazza navona. After using the (oh so tiny) restroom I was walking back outside when the old man bartender and the old men coffee drinkers kept saying to me "signorina! signorina!" which I simply ignored because I was on my HONEYMOON and I didn't care to deal with old italian men being, well, old italian men. A few minutes after sitting back down at our table it hit me: that bathroom was REALLY small. I was wearing A LOT of layers. There was a log of WIGGLING involved in getting said layers back in their proper place. Already knowing what I was going to find, I took my hand reached back to the waist of my jeans. Yup. A toilet paper tail. Lovely.

34
Lindsay
Apr 12, 2010
On a scale of 1-10, how much do you LOVE your Rebel? I want to splurge and get one, but can only do so in good conscience if I know it's a 9 or a 10 :)

35
Gorgonz
Jul 01, 2010
Good luck with your work and keep it up.

serving dish | vanity table

36
Brian
Mar 08, 2011
I honestly always wanted to get something like this for my birthday, but it seems I haven't reached that level of being so luck as you are.

However, I'm working hard to get there ;)

Brian

37
Ben Dover
Apr 17, 2012
kill yoursef before your next birthday please

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OUR DIY WEDDING
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EMAIL ME

What I Did On My Birthday, The World's Longest Essay About Nothing
Posted: Feb 11, 2010
37
Comments
Before I shut up about it once and for all, I would like to tell you a little bit about my birthday. First of all, if you can swing it, I highly recommend taking the day off work for your birthday, particularly if your birthday is on a Monday. This way you can stay in bed until 11am, reading your new library book (Lorrie Moore's A Gate at the Stairs, very enjoyable so far), periodically cackling to yourself with self-important glee because NO MORNING MEETING FOR YOU HAHAHA. Well, unless that morning meeting is with your bed, your library book, and a flaky pain au chocolat. High five!

(Did I just confess to spending the first few hours of my 30th birthday reading a library book? There's a punchline to a joke in there somewhere, isn't there? My 21-year-old self would be apalled.)

The next item on my agenda was to shower, dress, and go and get a mani-pedi, something I hadn't done---I recalled, as I was sitting in the weird massage chair, suddenly having jittery flashbacks---since the day before my wedding. The mani-pedi the day before my wedding was, if you remember, at the evocatively-named Nails 2 U (no, nails to you, buddy!) and I have very little memory of it aside from a) wearing some very short shorts that I would not be able to squeeze my way into these days if you greased them with a stick of butter first, and b) holding up a color to my show my sister, having her say "I'm not sure if it's very bridal," having the nail salon owner go "Oh! Who's the bride?" and subsequently experiencing a very, very, very surreal out-of-body experience that involved me saying "Whoa. Me!"

This mani-pedi, needless to say, was far less fraught with existental crises, and I left for my next stop, which was meeting Sean at The Sentinel to pick up the world's best sandwiches---they're corned beef, but please don't let that put you off; I don't like corned beef either and these are INSANE---and then eat them in Yerba Buena Gardens, along with a brownie and a cookie from Specialty's (if you're coming to San Francisco soon, I hope you're taking notes. As you can see, I like to eat.)

After lunch, I had about a half hour to kill, so I wandered into Anthropologie, where I had a 15% off coupon they'd sent me as a reward for....being born in February, I guess? I don't know, something like that. I never shop in Anthropologie, mostly because I feel like everything is either artfully ripped or six kajillion dollars (or both), but I figured I would browse the sale racks and see if anything struck my fancy. I took a pile of dresses into the dressing room, half-heartedly considered one until I discovered that it was $128 on sale---and it wasn't anything fancy, just a cotton sundress, though I suppose the fact that it used to be $228 probably made it some warped sort of deal somehow---and then left twenty minutes later empty-handed.

Now I don't know if you've ever been to the Anthropologie in San Francisco, but it is multi-level and the changing rooms are pretty much as far from the exit as you can get: to walk from the changing rooms to the exit, in fact, you have to traverse practically the whole store, which includes a rather long climb up a staircase in the middle. This is important. Remember this for later. Because as I was making this trek from the changing rooms to the exit, I kept hearing this: "Excuse me! Excuse me!"

They can't be talking to me, I thought, and so I kept walking, and I'd just made it out of the store and onto the street, when I felt a hand clasp my shoulder. Am I about to be accused of SHOPLIFTING? I thought, my mind wandering to the many educational after-school specials I had seen on the subject (cough, Beverly Hills 90210, cough). I span around, expecting to be faced with a burly security guard and found instead a diminutive Asian girl who made an apologetic face. "I just wanted to tell you," she whispered, "that your dress is tucked into your tights at the back."

Yes, Internet, I cannot make this shit up. On my thirtieth birthday, I walked the length and breadth of Anthropologie WITH MY UNDERWEAR FULLY ON DISPLAY. Well, that's certainly a way to celebrate, isn't it?

But you know, I was mortified by this for about five seconds---I thanked the girl profusely for following me through the store to catch up with me, god knows what sort of view she must have endured to do that---but by the time I was a few blocks away from Anthropologie, I was actually chuckling quite mirthfully at the situation. Aha! I thought! This is because I am now thirty! I am mature and wise and I have ceased to care what people think of me anymore! It happened just like they said it would!

Good job, however, that my next stop was the spa---specifically, this spa, which, despite the fact that it plays Enya when you click on that link, was really quite delightful---because it took my mind entirely off the fact that I'd just flashed the entire clientele of Anthropologie and instead set it to far more coherent thoughts like aaaaaaaaaaaaaaahhhh and mmmmmmmmm and ooooooh. I had a groupon, you see---have you heard of Groupon? I'm obsessed with it---so I booked a massage as a special treat, and then took advantage of the fact that it was three o'clock on a Monday afternoon and I had nowhere else to be and spent an obscene amount of time in the steam room. My god, I love the steam room. I went in, like, three separate times. My skin looked fabulous afterwards, I'm telling you. If I'm ever rich enough, I'm going to install a steam room in my house and I will conduct all business from there, except maybe not anything that requires a) paper (it'll droop) and b) me to meet publicly with anyone (I'll be sweaty), though everything else apart from that will be fair game.

Anyway, after I finally left the locker room at the spa---they had a shower with ten shower heads, which didn't so much give one the impression of showering but rather of being caught in a tropical monsoon---I did a quick spot of shopping in Union Square (found a dress and some earrings) and then returned home, where it was time for champagne, and not just champagne, but also presents. Sean gave me an Arco lamp, which I have been coveting for years---I don't have a picture of it since it's currently sitting in three pieces on our living room floor, but it looks like this (PS: how much do you want that giant globe in the corner?)---and also some Hunter wellington boots, which might sound dorky to you, but which I have also been coveting for years, though particularly strongly for the last few weeks when the rain was coming down in San Francisco like a shower with ten showerheads.



Wait, what do you mean I'm supposed to take the tag off first?

I thought this was the end of the presents---it was certainly enough for me---but he had one more surprise up his sleeve, and when I show you this next photo, I think you will quite likely be able to feel my excitement LEAPING OUT OF THE COMPUTER AND CRACKLING ONTO YOUR SKIN, that's how pumped I was about it.



Yes, my friends, that is a new camera, the first DSLR I've ever owned. I think you can see that I like it.

The day ended with a delicious dinner at Chapeau!, which I would recommend you run to if you are ever in the San Francisco area and like steak, cheese, butter, and waiters with French accents, and I have to say, it was truly one of the most brilliant days I've had in a while.





I would also like to shut up, finally, about turning thirty, because for all my silly fretting and worrying---which your fantastic comments completely helped to eradicate, by the way---it really wasn't as huge a deal as I'd thought it would be. In fact, it really wasn't a big deal at all. Apart from that bit where I walked around with my dress tucked into my tights and my bum hanging out in a major urban retail store, of course. That part wasn't my favorite.

Lots more photos here, though thankfully none of that scene in Anthropologie. We're just going to pretend that never happened.

Filed Under: Me, Me, Me, Me, Me, The San Francisco Adventure
1
Connie
Feb 12, 2010
You make me smile. I'm glad you had a good birthday. Everyone should feel pampered on their birthday.

2
Isobel
Feb 12, 2010
Yep, turning 30 was fine. It was 31 that was horrible ;)

Glad you had such a good birthday - great camera!

3
Catherine
Feb 12, 2010
You make an excellent case for the Birthday Day Off. (Beats hiding in the printroom hoping no-one has remembered, lest there be a public serenade. Yeesh.)

Also, lovely haircut.

4
Kavita
Feb 12, 2010
Love the 'excuse me' story, and it was great reading all the details of your 30th birthday. Sounds absolutely perfect.

5
shan
Feb 12, 2010
Sounds like an absolutely amazing day, Holly, one that I want to try to recreate when it's my birthday again! Glad you had a great day!

6
Helen
Feb 12, 2010
Any day that starts with pain au chocolat and ends with chocolate souffle cake by way of champagne and Kir Royale is going to be good! By the way, I love how in the photo of you with the Veuve Cliquot box, Charlie is staring up at it like he's after a glass. You clearly have a cat with classy tastes.

7
Nicki
Feb 12, 2010
You are amazing! You have already discovered the secret to aging gracefully and you did it in only one day!

Remember the good, forget the bad.

See?

8
nku
Feb 12, 2010
What an awesome post.

I’m going to keep this and use it as a template for my 30th birthday. Even the knicker flashing bit. I’m bound to do something shameful, it might just as well be that!

Happy Birthday.

9
Lori
Feb 12, 2010
at least you did have the tights on!

10
Home Sweet Sarah
Feb 12, 2010
This is exactly like my birthday (which is today), except that the sound of rustling wrapping paper caused me to get up before 6AM, not 11AM. Either way, though, the mani-pedi and the massage? Right there with ya.

11
Chelle
Feb 12, 2010
You are going to love your Rebel.
I have had mine for several years now and it is, hands down, the best present my husband ever gave me and, he gave me two beautiful children so, yeah...LOVE the Rebel.
P.S. It sounds like your birthday was perfect and you really will love your thirties :)

12
beyond
Feb 12, 2010
of course now i'm dying to know which nail colors are bridal and which are not.
my aunt once ran down a busy street after a woman who had her skirt tucked into her panties. the woman was so grateful, she almost kissed my aunt's feet.

13
Ris
Feb 12, 2010
I can never afford anything in Anthropologie, nor am I ever 100% sure I want to. Like yeah, that top is *kind* of cute and *maybe* I could pull it off. Oh, what's that you say? It's $75 and in no way work-appropriate so essentially I could only wear it on the weekend and when it's at least 80 degrees out? Alright then, that's a no.

14
Arina
Feb 12, 2010
Sounds like a lovely day, all around! (And I agree with you on Anthropologie. The quality never seems to live up to the price, which annoys me greatly about that store.)

15
Lori
Feb 12, 2010
Happy Belated Birthday! What a hilarious story. Better the undies showing then, say, something like toilet paper hanging out. (Which happened to someone I know) Yikes!

16
Amy --- Just A Titch
Feb 12, 2010
What a lovely birthday! Glad it was so wonderful.

P.S. I tucked my dress into my tights last week...except I was at work. And a co-worker had to tell me. At least I didn't walk into my classroom of 35 13-year-olds with my underwear showing. BUT STILL.

17
Chris
Feb 12, 2010
Ooooh...the Rebel. I bought myself the same camera last year for my 38th b-day and now every gift giving event is filled with ..oooh, I'd really love this lens or oooh, I need a new bag

18
HIp Hip Gin Gin
Feb 12, 2010
Sounds like you had a perfect birthday! I hope my 30th is that fabulous. Right down to the wellington boots which by the way are totally not dorky I have been coveting them forever as well since every time it rains in New England there is some sort of flood.
And hey, if flashing a bit of bum is the price one has to pay for the rest of the day being so fantastic, then sign my bum up!!

19
Chris
Feb 12, 2010
Firstly Happy Birthday(!), and I am glad you're not dwelling on that unfortunate dress-stuck-in-tights incident. And secondly- oh MAN am I jealous of your Rebel. That is what I have been coveting for years. YEARS. Enjoy!

20
Jennie
Feb 12, 2010
You've set a very high Birthday Bar that I'll aim for next year. Although Birthday Bar also sounds like the great name of a place that only serves desserts with candles while people sing to you.

21
Nothing But Bonfires
Feb 12, 2010
Jennie, I think you've just had a million dollar business idea.

22
Jill
Feb 12, 2010
1. Happy birthday! What a lovely post.
2. Have you had a sandwich at Ike's yet? They're insane. Onion rings, mozzarella sticks—on a sandwich? And oh, his dirty sauce! (Wait, that sounded extra dirty.) The lines are crazy but the wait is SO worth it.
3. The boots! I wanted the silver pair until I saw them live (a little too Tinman) so now I covet the red. And have you seen the sock inserts? Fabulous!

23
AnEmily
Feb 12, 2010
That's the same camera I got for my 39th birthday...er, over a year ago. I'm old. The camera is great-you'll love it! notmartha.com had a lot of great things to say about it too.

24
Allison
Feb 12, 2010
De-lurking to ask if anyone ever asks you if they want your life? Because I do. You have a lovely, beautiful life. And you seem very happy. All the best, from this rambling de-lurker!

25
Kelly
Feb 12, 2010
Yep, been to that Anthropologie and agree, it's huge and set up badly. I never get anything there either.

I love Specialty's HUGE chocolate chip cookies! Although where I work we order food from there constantly, so it can be very dangerous to have those cookies around me all the time.

Love the DSLR, perfect gift! I just bought myself (as a Christmas present to me) the Canon T1i and love it!

26
Valerie
Feb 12, 2010
Not sure if they would come in handy in San Fran, but did you know they also make fleece liner socks for the Hunter boots? I live in the midwest and got some so that I could wear my Hunter's in the snow without getting frostbite on my toes and they work great!

27
Laurie
Feb 13, 2010
My sister once walked 10 blocks through downtown Chicago before someone told her that her skirt was tucked into the back of her waistband. San Franciscans must be very friendly!

28
Melanie
Feb 14, 2010
Your day sounds delightful. I love reading about your life, even if I'm slightly jealous.

29
Sarah Ashley
Feb 16, 2010
Holly, I can't believe you are 30! You are in great shape & look younger than you really are. (I'm told the same too. I really think it will pay off one day when we're older) Where did you find those lovely earnings?

30
Kristabella
Feb 16, 2010
Sometimes I think "man, these crazy things only happen to me!" (see: crazy biker chasing me into a salon.)

And then I read your post and it's like straight out of a YM Say Anything column and then I realize that it is why I love you! Because you tell the internet these things! And crazy things happen to you too!

So happy you had a wonderful birthday my friend!

31
NothingButBonfires
Feb 16, 2010
Thank you, Sarah Ashley! Earrings are just H&M.

32
Sutswana
Feb 21, 2010
Reading this belatedly but I have to share: just a few days after your bday I had to take a towel to my daughter who had just finished her swim lesson at the community center pool. To do this I had to weave my way through the small crowd of parents on the bleacher things, descend the stairs to the pool area, walk the length of the pool, all this in front of the glass-wall observation deck above, and then all the way back again. My husband was bug-eyed when I got back, said, "Turn around, but don't do it obviously." (Wha??) So I did, and he calmly informed me I had a length of toilet paper flapping out the top of my jeans. Lovely.

Happy belated birthday, and congrats on finally crossing the perceived hurdle of turning 30.

33
annie
Feb 22, 2010
ONE: The last time I was in that anthropologie in the city I was nine months pregnant. OH YES I DO remember the walk from the fitting rooms to the entrance. I had to sit down and take a break half way. And then another break on the stairs.

TWO: When my husband and I were in Rome on our honeymoon we were eating dinner at this little cafe in the piazza navona. After using the (oh so tiny) restroom I was walking back outside when the old man bartender and the old men coffee drinkers kept saying to me "signorina! signorina!" which I simply ignored because I was on my HONEYMOON and I didn't care to deal with old italian men being, well, old italian men. A few minutes after sitting back down at our table it hit me: that bathroom was REALLY small. I was wearing A LOT of layers. There was a log of WIGGLING involved in getting said layers back in their proper place. Already knowing what I was going to find, I took my hand reached back to the waist of my jeans. Yup. A toilet paper tail. Lovely.

34
Lindsay
Apr 12, 2010
On a scale of 1-10, how much do you LOVE your Rebel? I want to splurge and get one, but can only do so in good conscience if I know it's a 9 or a 10 :)

35
Gorgonz
Jul 01, 2010
Good luck with your work and keep it up.

serving dish | vanity table

36
Brian
Mar 08, 2011
I honestly always wanted to get something like this for my birthday, but it seems I haven't reached that level of being so luck as you are.

However, I'm working hard to get there ;)

Brian

37
Ben Dover
Apr 17, 2012
kill yoursef before your next birthday please

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What I Did On My Birthday, The World's Longest Essay About Nothing
Posted: Feb 11, 2010
37
Comments
Before I shut up about it once and for all, I would like to tell you a little bit about my birthday. First of all, if you can swing it, I highly recommend taking the day off work for your birthday, particularly if your birthday is on a Monday. This way you can stay in bed until 11am, reading your new library book (Lorrie Moore's A Gate at the Stairs, very enjoyable so far), periodically cackling to yourself with self-important glee because NO MORNING MEETING FOR YOU HAHAHA. Well, unless that morning meeting is with your bed, your library book, and a flaky pain au chocolat. High five!

(Did I just confess to spending the first few hours of my 30th birthday reading a library book? There's a punchline to a joke in there somewhere, isn't there? My 21-year-old self would be apalled.)

The next item on my agenda was to shower, dress, and go and get a mani-pedi, something I hadn't done---I recalled, as I was sitting in the weird massage chair, suddenly having jittery flashbacks---since the day before my wedding. The mani-pedi the day before my wedding was, if you remember, at the evocatively-named Nails 2 U (no, nails to you, buddy!) and I have very little memory of it aside from a) wearing some very short shorts that I would not be able to squeeze my way into these days if you greased them with a stick of butter first, and b) holding up a color to my show my sister, having her say "I'm not sure if it's very bridal," having the nail salon owner go "Oh! Who's the bride?" and subsequently experiencing a very, very, very surreal out-of-body experience that involved me saying "Whoa. Me!"

This mani-pedi, needless to say, was far less fraught with existental crises, and I left for my next stop, which was meeting Sean at The Sentinel to pick up the world's best sandwiches---they're corned beef, but please don't let that put you off; I don't like corned beef either and these are INSANE---and then eat them in Yerba Buena Gardens, along with a brownie and a cookie from Specialty's (if you're coming to San Francisco soon, I hope you're taking notes. As you can see, I like to eat.)

After lunch, I had about a half hour to kill, so I wandered into Anthropologie, where I had a 15% off coupon they'd sent me as a reward for....being born in February, I guess? I don't know, something like that. I never shop in Anthropologie, mostly because I feel like everything is either artfully ripped or six kajillion dollars (or both), but I figured I would browse the sale racks and see if anything struck my fancy. I took a pile of dresses into the dressing room, half-heartedly considered one until I discovered that it was $128 on sale---and it wasn't anything fancy, just a cotton sundress, though I suppose the fact that it used to be $228 probably made it some warped sort of deal somehow---and then left twenty minutes later empty-handed.

Now I don't know if you've ever been to the Anthropologie in San Francisco, but it is multi-level and the changing rooms are pretty much as far from the exit as you can get: to walk from the changing rooms to the exit, in fact, you have to traverse practically the whole store, which includes a rather long climb up a staircase in the middle. This is important. Remember this for later. Because as I was making this trek from the changing rooms to the exit, I kept hearing this: "Excuse me! Excuse me!"

They can't be talking to me, I thought, and so I kept walking, and I'd just made it out of the store and onto the street, when I felt a hand clasp my shoulder. Am I about to be accused of SHOPLIFTING? I thought, my mind wandering to the many educational after-school specials I had seen on the subject (cough, Beverly Hills 90210, cough). I span around, expecting to be faced with a burly security guard and found instead a diminutive Asian girl who made an apologetic face. "I just wanted to tell you," she whispered, "that your dress is tucked into your tights at the back."

Yes, Internet, I cannot make this shit up. On my thirtieth birthday, I walked the length and breadth of Anthropologie WITH MY UNDERWEAR FULLY ON DISPLAY. Well, that's certainly a way to celebrate, isn't it?

But you know, I was mortified by this for about five seconds---I thanked the girl profusely for following me through the store to catch up with me, god knows what sort of view she must have endured to do that---but by the time I was a few blocks away from Anthropologie, I was actually chuckling quite mirthfully at the situation. Aha! I thought! This is because I am now thirty! I am mature and wise and I have ceased to care what people think of me anymore! It happened just like they said it would!

Good job, however, that my next stop was the spa---specifically, this spa, which, despite the fact that it plays Enya when you click on that link, was really quite delightful---because it took my mind entirely off the fact that I'd just flashed the entire clientele of Anthropologie and instead set it to far more coherent thoughts like aaaaaaaaaaaaaaahhhh and mmmmmmmmm and ooooooh. I had a groupon, you see---have you heard of Groupon? I'm obsessed with it---so I booked a massage as a special treat, and then took advantage of the fact that it was three o'clock on a Monday afternoon and I had nowhere else to be and spent an obscene amount of time in the steam room. My god, I love the steam room. I went in, like, three separate times. My skin looked fabulous afterwards, I'm telling you. If I'm ever rich enough, I'm going to install a steam room in my house and I will conduct all business from there, except maybe not anything that requires a) paper (it'll droop) and b) me to meet publicly with anyone (I'll be sweaty), though everything else apart from that will be fair game.

Anyway, after I finally left the locker room at the spa---they had a shower with ten shower heads, which didn't so much give one the impression of showering but rather of being caught in a tropical monsoon---I did a quick spot of shopping in Union Square (found a dress and some earrings) and then returned home, where it was time for champagne, and not just champagne, but also presents. Sean gave me an Arco lamp, which I have been coveting for years---I don't have a picture of it since it's currently sitting in three pieces on our living room floor, but it looks like this (PS: how much do you want that giant globe in the corner?)---and also some Hunter wellington boots, which might sound dorky to you, but which I have also been coveting for years, though particularly strongly for the last few weeks when the rain was coming down in San Francisco like a shower with ten showerheads.



Wait, what do you mean I'm supposed to take the tag off first?

I thought this was the end of the presents---it was certainly enough for me---but he had one more surprise up his sleeve, and when I show you this next photo, I think you will quite likely be able to feel my excitement LEAPING OUT OF THE COMPUTER AND CRACKLING ONTO YOUR SKIN, that's how pumped I was about it.



Yes, my friends, that is a new camera, the first DSLR I've ever owned. I think you can see that I like it.

The day ended with a delicious dinner at Chapeau!, which I would recommend you run to if you are ever in the San Francisco area and like steak, cheese, butter, and waiters with French accents, and I have to say, it was truly one of the most brilliant days I've had in a while.





I would also like to shut up, finally, about turning thirty, because for all my silly fretting and worrying---which your fantastic comments completely helped to eradicate, by the way---it really wasn't as huge a deal as I'd thought it would be. In fact, it really wasn't a big deal at all. Apart from that bit where I walked around with my dress tucked into my tights and my bum hanging out in a major urban retail store, of course. That part wasn't my favorite.

Lots more photos here, though thankfully none of that scene in Anthropologie. We're just going to pretend that never happened.

Filed Under: Me, Me, Me, Me, Me, The San Francisco Adventure
1
Connie
Feb 12, 2010
You make me smile. I'm glad you had a good birthday. Everyone should feel pampered on their birthday.

2
Isobel
Feb 12, 2010
Yep, turning 30 was fine. It was 31 that was horrible ;)

Glad you had such a good birthday - great camera!

3
Catherine
Feb 12, 2010
You make an excellent case for the Birthday Day Off. (Beats hiding in the printroom hoping no-one has remembered, lest there be a public serenade. Yeesh.)

Also, lovely haircut.

4
Kavita
Feb 12, 2010
Love the 'excuse me' story, and it was great reading all the details of your 30th birthday. Sounds absolutely perfect.

5
shan
Feb 12, 2010
Sounds like an absolutely amazing day, Holly, one that I want to try to recreate when it's my birthday again! Glad you had a great day!

6
Helen
Feb 12, 2010
Any day that starts with pain au chocolat and ends with chocolate souffle cake by way of champagne and Kir Royale is going to be good! By the way, I love how in the photo of you with the Veuve Cliquot box, Charlie is staring up at it like he's after a glass. You clearly have a cat with classy tastes.

7
Nicki
Feb 12, 2010
You are amazing! You have already discovered the secret to aging gracefully and you did it in only one day!

Remember the good, forget the bad.

See?

8
nku
Feb 12, 2010
What an awesome post.

I’m going to keep this and use it as a template for my 30th birthday. Even the knicker flashing bit. I’m bound to do something shameful, it might just as well be that!

Happy Birthday.

9
Lori
Feb 12, 2010
at least you did have the tights on!

10
Home Sweet Sarah
Feb 12, 2010
This is exactly like my birthday (which is today), except that the sound of rustling wrapping paper caused me to get up before 6AM, not 11AM. Either way, though, the mani-pedi and the massage? Right there with ya.

11
Chelle
Feb 12, 2010
You are going to love your Rebel.
I have had mine for several years now and it is, hands down, the best present my husband ever gave me and, he gave me two beautiful children so, yeah...LOVE the Rebel.
P.S. It sounds like your birthday was perfect and you really will love your thirties :)

12
beyond
Feb 12, 2010
of course now i'm dying to know which nail colors are bridal and which are not.
my aunt once ran down a busy street after a woman who had her skirt tucked into her panties. the woman was so grateful, she almost kissed my aunt's feet.

13
Ris
Feb 12, 2010
I can never afford anything in Anthropologie, nor am I ever 100% sure I want to. Like yeah, that top is *kind* of cute and *maybe* I could pull it off. Oh, what's that you say? It's $75 and in no way work-appropriate so essentially I could only wear it on the weekend and when it's at least 80 degrees out? Alright then, that's a no.

14
Arina
Feb 12, 2010
Sounds like a lovely day, all around! (And I agree with you on Anthropologie. The quality never seems to live up to the price, which annoys me greatly about that store.)

15
Lori
Feb 12, 2010
Happy Belated Birthday! What a hilarious story. Better the undies showing then, say, something like toilet paper hanging out. (Which happened to someone I know) Yikes!

16
Amy --- Just A Titch
Feb 12, 2010
What a lovely birthday! Glad it was so wonderful.

P.S. I tucked my dress into my tights last week...except I was at work. And a co-worker had to tell me. At least I didn't walk into my classroom of 35 13-year-olds with my underwear showing. BUT STILL.

17
Chris
Feb 12, 2010
Ooooh...the Rebel. I bought myself the same camera last year for my 38th b-day and now every gift giving event is filled with ..oooh, I'd really love this lens or oooh, I need a new bag

18
HIp Hip Gin Gin
Feb 12, 2010
Sounds like you had a perfect birthday! I hope my 30th is that fabulous. Right down to the wellington boots which by the way are totally not dorky I have been coveting them forever as well since every time it rains in New England there is some sort of flood.
And hey, if flashing a bit of bum is the price one has to pay for the rest of the day being so fantastic, then sign my bum up!!

19
Chris
Feb 12, 2010
Firstly Happy Birthday(!), and I am glad you're not dwelling on that unfortunate dress-stuck-in-tights incident. And secondly- oh MAN am I jealous of your Rebel. That is what I have been coveting for years. YEARS. Enjoy!

20
Jennie
Feb 12, 2010
You've set a very high Birthday Bar that I'll aim for next year. Although Birthday Bar also sounds like the great name of a place that only serves desserts with candles while people sing to you.

21
Nothing But Bonfires
Feb 12, 2010
Jennie, I think you've just had a million dollar business idea.

22
Jill
Feb 12, 2010
1. Happy birthday! What a lovely post.
2. Have you had a sandwich at Ike's yet? They're insane. Onion rings, mozzarella sticks—on a sandwich? And oh, his dirty sauce! (Wait, that sounded extra dirty.) The lines are crazy but the wait is SO worth it.
3. The boots! I wanted the silver pair until I saw them live (a little too Tinman) so now I covet the red. And have you seen the sock inserts? Fabulous!

23
AnEmily
Feb 12, 2010
That's the same camera I got for my 39th birthday...er, over a year ago. I'm old. The camera is great-you'll love it! notmartha.com had a lot of great things to say about it too.

24
Allison
Feb 12, 2010
De-lurking to ask if anyone ever asks you if they want your life? Because I do. You have a lovely, beautiful life. And you seem very happy. All the best, from this rambling de-lurker!

25
Kelly
Feb 12, 2010
Yep, been to that Anthropologie and agree, it's huge and set up badly. I never get anything there either.

I love Specialty's HUGE chocolate chip cookies! Although where I work we order food from there constantly, so it can be very dangerous to have those cookies around me all the time.

Love the DSLR, perfect gift! I just bought myself (as a Christmas present to me) the Canon T1i and love it!

26
Valerie
Feb 12, 2010
Not sure if they would come in handy in San Fran, but did you know they also make fleece liner socks for the Hunter boots? I live in the midwest and got some so that I could wear my Hunter's in the snow without getting frostbite on my toes and they work great!

27
Laurie
Feb 13, 2010
My sister once walked 10 blocks through downtown Chicago before someone told her that her skirt was tucked into the back of her waistband. San Franciscans must be very friendly!

28
Melanie
Feb 14, 2010
Your day sounds delightful. I love reading about your life, even if I'm slightly jealous.

29
Sarah Ashley
Feb 16, 2010
Holly, I can't believe you are 30! You are in great shape & look younger than you really are. (I'm told the same too. I really think it will pay off one day when we're older) Where did you find those lovely earnings?

30
Kristabella
Feb 16, 2010
Sometimes I think "man, these crazy things only happen to me!" (see: crazy biker chasing me into a salon.)

And then I read your post and it's like straight out of a YM Say Anything column and then I realize that it is why I love you! Because you tell the internet these things! And crazy things happen to you too!

So happy you had a wonderful birthday my friend!

31
NothingButBonfires
Feb 16, 2010
Thank you, Sarah Ashley! Earrings are just H&M.

32
Sutswana
Feb 21, 2010
Reading this belatedly but I have to share: just a few days after your bday I had to take a towel to my daughter who had just finished her swim lesson at the community center pool. To do this I had to weave my way through the small crowd of parents on the bleacher things, descend the stairs to the pool area, walk the length of the pool, all this in front of the glass-wall observation deck above, and then all the way back again. My husband was bug-eyed when I got back, said, "Turn around, but don't do it obviously." (Wha??) So I did, and he calmly informed me I had a length of toilet paper flapping out the top of my jeans. Lovely.

Happy belated birthday, and congrats on finally crossing the perceived hurdle of turning 30.

33
annie
Feb 22, 2010
ONE: The last time I was in that anthropologie in the city I was nine months pregnant. OH YES I DO remember the walk from the fitting rooms to the entrance. I had to sit down and take a break half way. And then another break on the stairs.

TWO: When my husband and I were in Rome on our honeymoon we were eating dinner at this little cafe in the piazza navona. After using the (oh so tiny) restroom I was walking back outside when the old man bartender and the old men coffee drinkers kept saying to me "signorina! signorina!" which I simply ignored because I was on my HONEYMOON and I didn't care to deal with old italian men being, well, old italian men. A few minutes after sitting back down at our table it hit me: that bathroom was REALLY small. I was wearing A LOT of layers. There was a log of WIGGLING involved in getting said layers back in their proper place. Already knowing what I was going to find, I took my hand reached back to the waist of my jeans. Yup. A toilet paper tail. Lovely.

34
Lindsay
Apr 12, 2010
On a scale of 1-10, how much do you LOVE your Rebel? I want to splurge and get one, but can only do so in good conscience if I know it's a 9 or a 10 :)

35
Gorgonz
Jul 01, 2010
Good luck with your work and keep it up.

serving dish | vanity table

36
Brian
Mar 08, 2011
I honestly always wanted to get something like this for my birthday, but it seems I haven't reached that level of being so luck as you are.

However, I'm working hard to get there ;)

Brian

37
Ben Dover
Apr 17, 2012
kill yoursef before your next birthday please

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What I Did On My Birthday, The World's Longest Essay About Nothing
Posted: Feb 11, 2010
37
Comments
Before I shut up about it once and for all, I would like to tell you a little bit about my birthday. First of all, if you can swing it, I highly recommend taking the day off work for your birthday, particularly if your birthday is on a Monday. This way you can stay in bed until 11am, reading your new library book (Lorrie Moore's A Gate at the Stairs, very enjoyable so far), periodically cackling to yourself with self-important glee because NO MORNING MEETING FOR YOU HAHAHA. Well, unless that morning meeting is with your bed, your library book, and a flaky pain au chocolat. High five!

(Did I just confess to spending the first few hours of my 30th birthday reading a library book? There's a punchline to a joke in there somewhere, isn't there? My 21-year-old self would be apalled.)

The next item on my agenda was to shower, dress, and go and get a mani-pedi, something I hadn't done---I recalled, as I was sitting in the weird massage chair, suddenly having jittery flashbacks---since the day before my wedding. The mani-pedi the day before my wedding was, if you remember, at the evocatively-named Nails 2 U (no, nails to you, buddy!) and I have very little memory of it aside from a) wearing some very short shorts that I would not be able to squeeze my way into these days if you greased them with a stick of butter first, and b) holding up a color to my show my sister, having her say "I'm not sure if it's very bridal," having the nail salon owner go "Oh! Who's the bride?" and subsequently experiencing a very, very, very surreal out-of-body experience that involved me saying "Whoa. Me!"

This mani-pedi, needless to say, was far less fraught with existental crises, and I left for my next stop, which was meeting Sean at The Sentinel to pick up the world's best sandwiches---they're corned beef, but please don't let that put you off; I don't like corned beef either and these are INSANE---and then eat them in Yerba Buena Gardens, along with a brownie and a cookie from Specialty's (if you're coming to San Francisco soon, I hope you're taking notes. As you can see, I like to eat.)

After lunch, I had about a half hour to kill, so I wandered into Anthropologie, where I had a 15% off coupon they'd sent me as a reward for....being born in February, I guess? I don't know, something like that. I never shop in Anthropologie, mostly because I feel like everything is either artfully ripped or six kajillion dollars (or both), but I figured I would browse the sale racks and see if anything struck my fancy. I took a pile of dresses into the dressing room, half-heartedly considered one until I discovered that it was $128 on sale---and it wasn't anything fancy, just a cotton sundress, though I suppose the fact that it used to be $228 probably made it some warped sort of deal somehow---and then left twenty minutes later empty-handed.

Now I don't know if you've ever been to the Anthropologie in San Francisco, but it is multi-level and the changing rooms are pretty much as far from the exit as you can get: to walk from the changing rooms to the exit, in fact, you have to traverse practically the whole store, which includes a rather long climb up a staircase in the middle. This is important. Remember this for later. Because as I was making this trek from the changing rooms to the exit, I kept hearing this: "Excuse me! Excuse me!"

They can't be talking to me, I thought, and so I kept walking, and I'd just made it out of the store and onto the street, when I felt a hand clasp my shoulder. Am I about to be accused of SHOPLIFTING? I thought, my mind wandering to the many educational after-school specials I had seen on the subject (cough, Beverly Hills 90210, cough). I span around, expecting to be faced with a burly security guard and found instead a diminutive Asian girl who made an apologetic face. "I just wanted to tell you," she whispered, "that your dress is tucked into your tights at the back."

Yes, Internet, I cannot make this shit up. On my thirtieth birthday, I walked the length and breadth of Anthropologie WITH MY UNDERWEAR FULLY ON DISPLAY. Well, that's certainly a way to celebrate, isn't it?

But you know, I was mortified by this for about five seconds---I thanked the girl profusely for following me through the store to catch up with me, god knows what sort of view she must have endured to do that---but by the time I was a few blocks away from Anthropologie, I was actually chuckling quite mirthfully at the situation. Aha! I thought! This is because I am now thirty! I am mature and wise and I have ceased to care what people think of me anymore! It happened just like they said it would!

Good job, however, that my next stop was the spa---specifically, this spa, which, despite the fact that it plays Enya when you click on that link, was really quite delightful---because it took my mind entirely off the fact that I'd just flashed the entire clientele of Anthropologie and instead set it to far more coherent thoughts like aaaaaaaaaaaaaaahhhh and mmmmmmmmm and ooooooh. I had a groupon, you see---have you heard of Groupon? I'm obsessed with it---so I booked a massage as a special treat, and then took advantage of the fact that it was three o'clock on a Monday afternoon and I had nowhere else to be and spent an obscene amount of time in the steam room. My god, I love the steam room. I went in, like, three separate times. My skin looked fabulous afterwards, I'm telling you. If I'm ever rich enough, I'm going to install a steam room in my house and I will conduct all business from there, except maybe not anything that requires a) paper (it'll droop) and b) me to meet publicly with anyone (I'll be sweaty), though everything else apart from that will be fair game.

Anyway, after I finally left the locker room at the spa---they had a shower with ten shower heads, which didn't so much give one the impression of showering but rather of being caught in a tropical monsoon---I did a quick spot of shopping in Union Square (found a dress and some earrings) and then returned home, where it was time for champagne, and not just champagne, but also presents. Sean gave me an Arco lamp, which I have been coveting for years---I don't have a picture of it since it's currently sitting in three pieces on our living room floor, but it looks like this (PS: how much do you want that giant globe in the corner?)---and also some Hunter wellington boots, which might sound dorky to you, but which I have also been coveting for years, though particularly strongly for the last few weeks when the rain was coming down in San Francisco like a shower with ten showerheads.



Wait, what do you mean I'm supposed to take the tag off first?

I thought this was the end of the presents---it was certainly enough for me---but he had one more surprise up his sleeve, and when I show you this next photo, I think you will quite likely be able to feel my excitement LEAPING OUT OF THE COMPUTER AND CRACKLING ONTO YOUR SKIN, that's how pumped I was about it.



Yes, my friends, that is a new camera, the first DSLR I've ever owned. I think you can see that I like it.

The day ended with a delicious dinner at Chapeau!, which I would recommend you run to if you are ever in the San Francisco area and like steak, cheese, butter, and waiters with French accents, and I have to say, it was truly one of the most brilliant days I've had in a while.





I would also like to shut up, finally, about turning thirty, because for all my silly fretting and worrying---which your fantastic comments completely helped to eradicate, by the way---it really wasn't as huge a deal as I'd thought it would be. In fact, it really wasn't a big deal at all. Apart from that bit where I walked around with my dress tucked into my tights and my bum hanging out in a major urban retail store, of course. That part wasn't my favorite.

Lots more photos here, though thankfully none of that scene in Anthropologie. We're just going to pretend that never happened.

Filed Under: Me, Me, Me, Me, Me, The San Francisco Adventure
1
Connie
Feb 12, 2010
You make me smile. I'm glad you had a good birthday. Everyone should feel pampered on their birthday.

2
Isobel
Feb 12, 2010
Yep, turning 30 was fine. It was 31 that was horrible ;)

Glad you had such a good birthday - great camera!

3
Catherine
Feb 12, 2010
You make an excellent case for the Birthday Day Off. (Beats hiding in the printroom hoping no-one has remembered, lest there be a public serenade. Yeesh.)

Also, lovely haircut.

4
Kavita
Feb 12, 2010
Love the 'excuse me' story, and it was great reading all the details of your 30th birthday. Sounds absolutely perfect.

5
shan
Feb 12, 2010
Sounds like an absolutely amazing day, Holly, one that I want to try to recreate when it's my birthday again! Glad you had a great day!

6
Helen
Feb 12, 2010
Any day that starts with pain au chocolat and ends with chocolate souffle cake by way of champagne and Kir Royale is going to be good! By the way, I love how in the photo of you with the Veuve Cliquot box, Charlie is staring up at it like he's after a glass. You clearly have a cat with classy tastes.

7
Nicki
Feb 12, 2010
You are amazing! You have already discovered the secret to aging gracefully and you did it in only one day!

Remember the good, forget the bad.

See?

8
nku
Feb 12, 2010
What an awesome post.

I’m going to keep this and use it as a template for my 30th birthday. Even the knicker flashing bit. I’m bound to do something shameful, it might just as well be that!

Happy Birthday.

9
Lori
Feb 12, 2010
at least you did have the tights on!

10
Home Sweet Sarah
Feb 12, 2010
This is exactly like my birthday (which is today), except that the sound of rustling wrapping paper caused me to get up before 6AM, not 11AM. Either way, though, the mani-pedi and the massage? Right there with ya.

11
Chelle
Feb 12, 2010
You are going to love your Rebel.
I have had mine for several years now and it is, hands down, the best present my husband ever gave me and, he gave me two beautiful children so, yeah...LOVE the Rebel.
P.S. It sounds like your birthday was perfect and you really will love your thirties :)

12
beyond
Feb 12, 2010
of course now i'm dying to know which nail colors are bridal and which are not.
my aunt once ran down a busy street after a woman who had her skirt tucked into her panties. the woman was so grateful, she almost kissed my aunt's feet.

13
Ris
Feb 12, 2010
I can never afford anything in Anthropologie, nor am I ever 100% sure I want to. Like yeah, that top is *kind* of cute and *maybe* I could pull it off. Oh, what's that you say? It's $75 and in no way work-appropriate so essentially I could only wear it on the weekend and when it's at least 80 degrees out? Alright then, that's a no.

14
Arina
Feb 12, 2010
Sounds like a lovely day, all around! (And I agree with you on Anthropologie. The quality never seems to live up to the price, which annoys me greatly about that store.)

15
Lori
Feb 12, 2010
Happy Belated Birthday! What a hilarious story. Better the undies showing then, say, something like toilet paper hanging out. (Which happened to someone I know) Yikes!

16
Amy --- Just A Titch
Feb 12, 2010
What a lovely birthday! Glad it was so wonderful.

P.S. I tucked my dress into my tights last week...except I was at work. And a co-worker had to tell me. At least I didn't walk into my classroom of 35 13-year-olds with my underwear showing. BUT STILL.

17
Chris
Feb 12, 2010
Ooooh...the Rebel. I bought myself the same camera last year for my 38th b-day and now every gift giving event is filled with ..oooh, I'd really love this lens or oooh, I need a new bag

18
HIp Hip Gin Gin
Feb 12, 2010
Sounds like you had a perfect birthday! I hope my 30th is that fabulous. Right down to the wellington boots which by the way are totally not dorky I have been coveting them forever as well since every time it rains in New England there is some sort of flood.
And hey, if flashing a bit of bum is the price one has to pay for the rest of the day being so fantastic, then sign my bum up!!

19
Chris
Feb 12, 2010
Firstly Happy Birthday(!), and I am glad you're not dwelling on that unfortunate dress-stuck-in-tights incident. And secondly- oh MAN am I jealous of your Rebel. That is what I have been coveting for years. YEARS. Enjoy!

20
Jennie
Feb 12, 2010
You've set a very high Birthday Bar that I'll aim for next year. Although Birthday Bar also sounds like the great name of a place that only serves desserts with candles while people sing to you.

21
Nothing But Bonfires
Feb 12, 2010
Jennie, I think you've just had a million dollar business idea.

22
Jill
Feb 12, 2010
1. Happy birthday! What a lovely post.
2. Have you had a sandwich at Ike's yet? They're insane. Onion rings, mozzarella sticks—on a sandwich? And oh, his dirty sauce! (Wait, that sounded extra dirty.) The lines are crazy but the wait is SO worth it.
3. The boots! I wanted the silver pair until I saw them live (a little too Tinman) so now I covet the red. And have you seen the sock inserts? Fabulous!

23
AnEmily
Feb 12, 2010
That's the same camera I got for my 39th birthday...er, over a year ago. I'm old. The camera is great-you'll love it! notmartha.com had a lot of great things to say about it too.

24
Allison
Feb 12, 2010
De-lurking to ask if anyone ever asks you if they want your life? Because I do. You have a lovely, beautiful life. And you seem very happy. All the best, from this rambling de-lurker!

25
Kelly
Feb 12, 2010
Yep, been to that Anthropologie and agree, it's huge and set up badly. I never get anything there either.

I love Specialty's HUGE chocolate chip cookies! Although where I work we order food from there constantly, so it can be very dangerous to have those cookies around me all the time.

Love the DSLR, perfect gift! I just bought myself (as a Christmas present to me) the Canon T1i and love it!

26
Valerie
Feb 12, 2010
Not sure if they would come in handy in San Fran, but did you know they also make fleece liner socks for the Hunter boots? I live in the midwest and got some so that I could wear my Hunter's in the snow without getting frostbite on my toes and they work great!

27
Laurie
Feb 13, 2010
My sister once walked 10 blocks through downtown Chicago before someone told her that her skirt was tucked into the back of her waistband. San Franciscans must be very friendly!

28
Melanie
Feb 14, 2010
Your day sounds delightful. I love reading about your life, even if I'm slightly jealous.

29
Sarah Ashley
Feb 16, 2010
Holly, I can't believe you are 30! You are in great shape & look younger than you really are. (I'm told the same too. I really think it will pay off one day when we're older) Where did you find those lovely earnings?

30
Kristabella
Feb 16, 2010
Sometimes I think "man, these crazy things only happen to me!" (see: crazy biker chasing me into a salon.)

And then I read your post and it's like straight out of a YM Say Anything column and then I realize that it is why I love you! Because you tell the internet these things! And crazy things happen to you too!

So happy you had a wonderful birthday my friend!

31
NothingButBonfires
Feb 16, 2010
Thank you, Sarah Ashley! Earrings are just H&M.

32
Sutswana
Feb 21, 2010
Reading this belatedly but I have to share: just a few days after your bday I had to take a towel to my daughter who had just finished her swim lesson at the community center pool. To do this I had to weave my way through the small crowd of parents on the bleacher things, descend the stairs to the pool area, walk the length of the pool, all this in front of the glass-wall observation deck above, and then all the way back again. My husband was bug-eyed when I got back, said, "Turn around, but don't do it obviously." (Wha??) So I did, and he calmly informed me I had a length of toilet paper flapping out the top of my jeans. Lovely.

Happy belated birthday, and congrats on finally crossing the perceived hurdle of turning 30.

33
annie
Feb 22, 2010
ONE: The last time I was in that anthropologie in the city I was nine months pregnant. OH YES I DO remember the walk from the fitting rooms to the entrance. I had to sit down and take a break half way. And then another break on the stairs.

TWO: When my husband and I were in Rome on our honeymoon we were eating dinner at this little cafe in the piazza navona. After using the (oh so tiny) restroom I was walking back outside when the old man bartender and the old men coffee drinkers kept saying to me "signorina! signorina!" which I simply ignored because I was on my HONEYMOON and I didn't care to deal with old italian men being, well, old italian men. A few minutes after sitting back down at our table it hit me: that bathroom was REALLY small. I was wearing A LOT of layers. There was a log of WIGGLING involved in getting said layers back in their proper place. Already knowing what I was going to find, I took my hand reached back to the waist of my jeans. Yup. A toilet paper tail. Lovely.

34
Lindsay
Apr 12, 2010
On a scale of 1-10, how much do you LOVE your Rebel? I want to splurge and get one, but can only do so in good conscience if I know it's a 9 or a 10 :)

35
Gorgonz
Jul 01, 2010
Good luck with your work and keep it up.

serving dish | vanity table

36
Brian
Mar 08, 2011
I honestly always wanted to get something like this for my birthday, but it seems I haven't reached that level of being so luck as you are.

However, I'm working hard to get there ;)

Brian

37
Ben Dover
Apr 17, 2012
kill yoursef before your next birthday please

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What I Did On My Birthday, The World's Longest Essay About Nothing
Posted: Feb 11, 2010
37
Comments
Before I shut up about it once and for all, I would like to tell you a little bit about my birthday. First of all, if you can swing it, I highly recommend taking the day off work for your birthday, particularly if your birthday is on a Monday. This way you can stay in bed until 11am, reading your new library book (Lorrie Moore's A Gate at the Stairs, very enjoyable so far), periodically cackling to yourself with self-important glee because NO MORNING MEETING FOR YOU HAHAHA. Well, unless that morning meeting is with your bed, your library book, and a flaky pain au chocolat. High five!

(Did I just confess to spending the first few hours of my 30th birthday reading a library book? There's a punchline to a joke in there somewhere, isn't there? My 21-year-old self would be apalled.)

The next item on my agenda was to shower, dress, and go and get a mani-pedi, something I hadn't done---I recalled, as I was sitting in the weird massage chair, suddenly having jittery flashbacks---since the day before my wedding. The mani-pedi the day before my wedding was, if you remember, at the evocatively-named Nails 2 U (no, nails to you, buddy!) and I have very little memory of it aside from a) wearing some very short shorts that I would not be able to squeeze my way into these days if you greased them with a stick of butter first, and b) holding up a color to my show my sister, having her say "I'm not sure if it's very bridal," having the nail salon owner go "Oh! Who's the bride?" and subsequently experiencing a very, very, very surreal out-of-body experience that involved me saying "Whoa. Me!"

This mani-pedi, needless to say, was far less fraught with existental crises, and I left for my next stop, which was meeting Sean at The Sentinel to pick up the world's best sandwiches---they're corned beef, but please don't let that put you off; I don't like corned beef either and these are INSANE---and then eat them in Yerba Buena Gardens, along with a brownie and a cookie from Specialty's (if you're coming to San Francisco soon, I hope you're taking notes. As you can see, I like to eat.)

After lunch, I had about a half hour to kill, so I wandered into Anthropologie, where I had a 15% off coupon they'd sent me as a reward for....being born in February, I guess? I don't know, something like that. I never shop in Anthropologie, mostly because I feel like everything is either artfully ripped or six kajillion dollars (or both), but I figured I would browse the sale racks and see if anything struck my fancy. I took a pile of dresses into the dressing room, half-heartedly considered one until I discovered that it was $128 on sale---and it wasn't anything fancy, just a cotton sundress, though I suppose the fact that it used to be $228 probably made it some warped sort of deal somehow---and then left twenty minutes later empty-handed.

Now I don't know if you've ever been to the Anthropologie in San Francisco, but it is multi-level and the changing rooms are pretty much as far from the exit as you can get: to walk from the changing rooms to the exit, in fact, you have to traverse practically the whole store, which includes a rather long climb up a staircase in the middle. This is important. Remember this for later. Because as I was making this trek from the changing rooms to the exit, I kept hearing this: "Excuse me! Excuse me!"

They can't be talking to me, I thought, and so I kept walking, and I'd just made it out of the store and onto the street, when I felt a hand clasp my shoulder. Am I about to be accused of SHOPLIFTING? I thought, my mind wandering to the many educational after-school specials I had seen on the subject (cough, Beverly Hills 90210, cough). I span around, expecting to be faced with a burly security guard and found instead a diminutive Asian girl who made an apologetic face. "I just wanted to tell you," she whispered, "that your dress is tucked into your tights at the back."

Yes, Internet, I cannot make this shit up. On my thirtieth birthday, I walked the length and breadth of Anthropologie WITH MY UNDERWEAR FULLY ON DISPLAY. Well, that's certainly a way to celebrate, isn't it?

But you know, I was mortified by this for about five seconds---I thanked the girl profusely for following me through the store to catch up with me, god knows what sort of view she must have endured to do that---but by the time I was a few blocks away from Anthropologie, I was actually chuckling quite mirthfully at the situation. Aha! I thought! This is because I am now thirty! I am mature and wise and I have ceased to care what people think of me anymore! It happened just like they said it would!

Good job, however, that my next stop was the spa---specifically, this spa, which, despite the fact that it plays Enya when you click on that link, was really quite delightful---because it took my mind entirely off the fact that I'd just flashed the entire clientele of Anthropologie and instead set it to far more coherent thoughts like aaaaaaaaaaaaaaahhhh and mmmmmmmmm and ooooooh. I had a groupon, you see---have you heard of Groupon? I'm obsessed with it---so I booked a massage as a special treat, and then took advantage of the fact that it was three o'clock on a Monday afternoon and I had nowhere else to be and spent an obscene amount of time in the steam room. My god, I love the steam room. I went in, like, three separate times. My skin looked fabulous afterwards, I'm telling you. If I'm ever rich enough, I'm going to install a steam room in my house and I will conduct all business from there, except maybe not anything that requires a) paper (it'll droop) and b) me to meet publicly with anyone (I'll be sweaty), though everything else apart from that will be fair game.

Anyway, after I finally left the locker room at the spa---they had a shower with ten shower heads, which didn't so much give one the impression of showering but rather of being caught in a tropical monsoon---I did a quick spot of shopping in Union Square (found a dress and some earrings) and then returned home, where it was time for champagne, and not just champagne, but also presents. Sean gave me an Arco lamp, which I have been coveting for years---I don't have a picture of it since it's currently sitting in three pieces on our living room floor, but it looks like this (PS: how much do you want that giant globe in the corner?)---and also some Hunter wellington boots, which might sound dorky to you, but which I have also been coveting for years, though particularly strongly for the last few weeks when the rain was coming down in San Francisco like a shower with ten showerheads.



Wait, what do you mean I'm supposed to take the tag off first?

I thought this was the end of the presents---it was certainly enough for me---but he had one more surprise up his sleeve, and when I show you this next photo, I think you will quite likely be able to feel my excitement LEAPING OUT OF THE COMPUTER AND CRACKLING ONTO YOUR SKIN, that's how pumped I was about it.



Yes, my friends, that is a new camera, the first DSLR I've ever owned. I think you can see that I like it.

The day ended with a delicious dinner at Chapeau!, which I would recommend you run to if you are ever in the San Francisco area and like steak, cheese, butter, and waiters with French accents, and I have to say, it was truly one of the most brilliant days I've had in a while.





I would also like to shut up, finally, about turning thirty, because for all my silly fretting and worrying---which your fantastic comments completely helped to eradicate, by the way---it really wasn't as huge a deal as I'd thought it would be. In fact, it really wasn't a big deal at all. Apart from that bit where I walked around with my dress tucked into my tights and my bum hanging out in a major urban retail store, of course. That part wasn't my favorite.

Lots more photos here, though thankfully none of that scene in Anthropologie. We're just going to pretend that never happened.

Filed Under: Me, Me, Me, Me, Me, The San Francisco Adventure
1
Connie
Feb 12, 2010
You make me smile. I'm glad you had a good birthday. Everyone should feel pampered on their birthday.

2
Isobel
Feb 12, 2010
Yep, turning 30 was fine. It was 31 that was horrible ;)

Glad you had such a good birthday - great camera!

3
Catherine
Feb 12, 2010
You make an excellent case for the Birthday Day Off. (Beats hiding in the printroom hoping no-one has remembered, lest there be a public serenade. Yeesh.)

Also, lovely haircut.

4
Kavita
Feb 12, 2010
Love the 'excuse me' story, and it was great reading all the details of your 30th birthday. Sounds absolutely perfect.

5
shan
Feb 12, 2010
Sounds like an absolutely amazing day, Holly, one that I want to try to recreate when it's my birthday again! Glad you had a great day!

6
Helen
Feb 12, 2010
Any day that starts with pain au chocolat and ends with chocolate souffle cake by way of champagne and Kir Royale is going to be good! By the way, I love how in the photo of you with the Veuve Cliquot box, Charlie is staring up at it like he's after a glass. You clearly have a cat with classy tastes.

7
Nicki
Feb 12, 2010
You are amazing! You have already discovered the secret to aging gracefully and you did it in only one day!

Remember the good, forget the bad.

See?

8
nku
Feb 12, 2010
What an awesome post.

I’m going to keep this and use it as a template for my 30th birthday. Even the knicker flashing bit. I’m bound to do something shameful, it might just as well be that!

Happy Birthday.

9
Lori
Feb 12, 2010
at least you did have the tights on!

10
Home Sweet Sarah
Feb 12, 2010
This is exactly like my birthday (which is today), except that the sound of rustling wrapping paper caused me to get up before 6AM, not 11AM. Either way, though, the mani-pedi and the massage? Right there with ya.

11
Chelle
Feb 12, 2010
You are going to love your Rebel.
I have had mine for several years now and it is, hands down, the best present my husband ever gave me and, he gave me two beautiful children so, yeah...LOVE the Rebel.
P.S. It sounds like your birthday was perfect and you really will love your thirties :)

12
beyond
Feb 12, 2010
of course now i'm dying to know which nail colors are bridal and which are not.
my aunt once ran down a busy street after a woman who had her skirt tucked into her panties. the woman was so grateful, she almost kissed my aunt's feet.

13
Ris
Feb 12, 2010
I can never afford anything in Anthropologie, nor am I ever 100% sure I want to. Like yeah, that top is *kind* of cute and *maybe* I could pull it off. Oh, what's that you say? It's $75 and in no way work-appropriate so essentially I could only wear it on the weekend and when it's at least 80 degrees out? Alright then, that's a no.

14
Arina
Feb 12, 2010
Sounds like a lovely day, all around! (And I agree with you on Anthropologie. The quality never seems to live up to the price, which annoys me greatly about that store.)

15
Lori
Feb 12, 2010
Happy Belated Birthday! What a hilarious story. Better the undies showing then, say, something like toilet paper hanging out. (Which happened to someone I know) Yikes!

16
Amy --- Just A Titch
Feb 12, 2010
What a lovely birthday! Glad it was so wonderful.

P.S. I tucked my dress into my tights last week...except I was at work. And a co-worker had to tell me. At least I didn't walk into my classroom of 35 13-year-olds with my underwear showing. BUT STILL.

17
Chris
Feb 12, 2010
Ooooh...the Rebel. I bought myself the same camera last year for my 38th b-day and now every gift giving event is filled with ..oooh, I'd really love this lens or oooh, I need a new bag

18
HIp Hip Gin Gin
Feb 12, 2010
Sounds like you had a perfect birthday! I hope my 30th is that fabulous. Right down to the wellington boots which by the way are totally not dorky I have been coveting them forever as well since every time it rains in New England there is some sort of flood.
And hey, if flashing a bit of bum is the price one has to pay for the rest of the day being so fantastic, then sign my bum up!!

19
Chris
Feb 12, 2010
Firstly Happy Birthday(!), and I am glad you're not dwelling on that unfortunate dress-stuck-in-tights incident. And secondly- oh MAN am I jealous of your Rebel. That is what I have been coveting for years. YEARS. Enjoy!

20
Jennie
Feb 12, 2010
You've set a very high Birthday Bar that I'll aim for next year. Although Birthday Bar also sounds like the great name of a place that only serves desserts with candles while people sing to you.

21
Nothing But Bonfires
Feb 12, 2010
Jennie, I think you've just had a million dollar business idea.

22
Jill
Feb 12, 2010
1. Happy birthday! What a lovely post.
2. Have you had a sandwich at Ike's yet? They're insane. Onion rings, mozzarella sticks—on a sandwich? And oh, his dirty sauce! (Wait, that sounded extra dirty.) The lines are crazy but the wait is SO worth it.
3. The boots! I wanted the silver pair until I saw them live (a little too Tinman) so now I covet the red. And have you seen the sock inserts? Fabulous!

23
AnEmily
Feb 12, 2010
That's the same camera I got for my 39th birthday...er, over a year ago. I'm old. The camera is great-you'll love it! notmartha.com had a lot of great things to say about it too.

24
Allison
Feb 12, 2010
De-lurking to ask if anyone ever asks you if they want your life? Because I do. You have a lovely, beautiful life. And you seem very happy. All the best, from this rambling de-lurker!

25
Kelly
Feb 12, 2010
Yep, been to that Anthropologie and agree, it's huge and set up badly. I never get anything there either.

I love Specialty's HUGE chocolate chip cookies! Although where I work we order food from there constantly, so it can be very dangerous to have those cookies around me all the time.

Love the DSLR, perfect gift! I just bought myself (as a Christmas present to me) the Canon T1i and love it!

26
Valerie
Feb 12, 2010
Not sure if they would come in handy in San Fran, but did you know they also make fleece liner socks for the Hunter boots? I live in the midwest and got some so that I could wear my Hunter's in the snow without getting frostbite on my toes and they work great!

27
Laurie
Feb 13, 2010
My sister once walked 10 blocks through downtown Chicago before someone told her that her skirt was tucked into the back of her waistband. San Franciscans must be very friendly!

28
Melanie
Feb 14, 2010
Your day sounds delightful. I love reading about your life, even if I'm slightly jealous.

29
Sarah Ashley
Feb 16, 2010
Holly, I can't believe you are 30! You are in great shape & look younger than you really are. (I'm told the same too. I really think it will pay off one day when we're older) Where did you find those lovely earnings?

30
Kristabella
Feb 16, 2010
Sometimes I think "man, these crazy things only happen to me!" (see: crazy biker chasing me into a salon.)

And then I read your post and it's like straight out of a YM Say Anything column and then I realize that it is why I love you! Because you tell the internet these things! And crazy things happen to you too!

So happy you had a wonderful birthday my friend!

31
NothingButBonfires
Feb 16, 2010
Thank you, Sarah Ashley! Earrings are just H&M.

32
Sutswana
Feb 21, 2010
Reading this belatedly but I have to share: just a few days after your bday I had to take a towel to my daughter who had just finished her swim lesson at the community center pool. To do this I had to weave my way through the small crowd of parents on the bleacher things, descend the stairs to the pool area, walk the length of the pool, all this in front of the glass-wall observation deck above, and then all the way back again. My husband was bug-eyed when I got back, said, "Turn around, but don't do it obviously." (Wha??) So I did, and he calmly informed me I had a length of toilet paper flapping out the top of my jeans. Lovely.

Happy belated birthday, and congrats on finally crossing the perceived hurdle of turning 30.

33
annie
Feb 22, 2010
ONE: The last time I was in that anthropologie in the city I was nine months pregnant. OH YES I DO remember the walk from the fitting rooms to the entrance. I had to sit down and take a break half way. And then another break on the stairs.

TWO: When my husband and I were in Rome on our honeymoon we were eating dinner at this little cafe in the piazza navona. After using the (oh so tiny) restroom I was walking back outside when the old man bartender and the old men coffee drinkers kept saying to me "signorina! signorina!" which I simply ignored because I was on my HONEYMOON and I didn't care to deal with old italian men being, well, old italian men. A few minutes after sitting back down at our table it hit me: that bathroom was REALLY small. I was wearing A LOT of layers. There was a log of WIGGLING involved in getting said layers back in their proper place. Already knowing what I was going to find, I took my hand reached back to the waist of my jeans. Yup. A toilet paper tail. Lovely.

34
Lindsay
Apr 12, 2010
On a scale of 1-10, how much do you LOVE your Rebel? I want to splurge and get one, but can only do so in good conscience if I know it's a 9 or a 10 :)

35
Gorgonz
Jul 01, 2010
Good luck with your work and keep it up.

serving dish | vanity table

36
Brian
Mar 08, 2011
I honestly always wanted to get something like this for my birthday, but it seems I haven't reached that level of being so luck as you are.

However, I'm working hard to get there ;)

Brian

37
Ben Dover
Apr 17, 2012
kill yoursef before your next birthday please

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Re: WOOO YVETHE SANTIAGO

Postby Bella Maldita » Mon Nov 17, 2014 4:30 pm


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List of cetaceans
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Cetaceans
Temporal range: Early Eocene – recent
Pre?
?
O
S
D
C
P
T
J
K
Pg
N
Bottlenose Dolphin KSC04pd0178.jpg
Bottlenose dolphin breaching
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Subphylum: Vertebrata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Cetacea
Brisson, 1762

This is a list of cetaceans. The order Cetacea includes whales, dolphins, and porpoises. It has around 90 living species, divided into the suborders Odontoceti (the toothed whales, including dolphins and porpoises) and Mysticeti (the baleen whales). In addition, numerous species of extinct cetaceans exist, but they are not listed here. This list contains only the known, extant cetacean species including several recent discoveries (the baiji is also included, though it is believed to have gone extinct in 2006).

Cetaceans are aquatic mammals characterised by having fusiform (streamlined) body shapes, paddle-shaped front limbs and vestigial hind limbs. Their tails have been flattened into flukes to aid propulsion.


Contents

1 Suborder Mysticeti: baleen whales
1.1 Family Balaenidae: right whales
1.2 Family Balaenopteridae: rorquals
1.3 Family Eschrichtiidae: gray whale
1.4 Family Neobalaenidae: pygmy right whale
2 Suborder Odontoceti: toothed whales
2.1 Family Delphinidae: oceanic dolphins
2.2 Family Monodontidae: narwhal and beluga
2.3 Family Phocoenidae: porpoises
2.4 Family Physeteridae: sperm whale
2.5 Family Kogiidae: dwarf and pygmy sperm whales
2.6 Family Ziphiidae: beaked whales
2.7 Superfamily Platanistoidea: river dolphins
2.7.1 Family Iniidae: river dolphins
2.7.2 Family Lipotidae: baiji
2.7.3 Family Platanistidae: South Asian river dolphin
2.7.4 Family Pontoporiidae: La Plata river dolphin
3 See also
4 Notes and references
5 External links

Suborder Mysticeti: baleen whales
Main article: Mysticeti

The baleen whales, also called whalebone whales or great whales, form the Mysticeti, one of two suborders of the Cetacea (whales, dolphins and porpoises). Baleen whales are characterized by having baleen plates for filtering food from water, rather than having teeth, as with the Odontocetes. This distinguishes them from the other suborder of cetaceans, the toothed whales or Odontoceti. Living Mysticeti species have teeth only during the embryonal phase. Fossil Mysticeti had teeth before baleen evolved.


Family Balaenidae: right whales
See also: Balaenidae

The Balaenidae family of cetaceans contains two genera. Commonly called the right whales, it contains mainly right whale species. This name can be confusing, however, since one of the species is the bowhead whale, which is different from the right whale. All the Balaenidae whales have the following features: a smooth belly and chin, with no ventral grooves; a distinctive head shape with strongly arched, narrow rostrum (anatomy) and bowed lower jaw; lower lips that enfold the sides and front of the rostrum; long, narrow, elastic baleen plates (up to 9 times longer longer than wide) with fine baleen fringes; the fusion of all the cervical vertebrae and other skeletal characteristics; and a slow swimming speed.[1]
Genus Balaena Linnaeus, 1758 – one species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Bowhead whale Balaena mysticetus
Linnaeus, 1758 Least Concern (LC) 8,000–9,200 Cetacea range map Bowhead Whale.png Bowhead whale size.svg
60 tonnes Bowheads42.jpg
Genus Eubalaena Gray, 1864 – 3 species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
North Atlantic right whale Eubalaena glacialis
Müller, 1776 Endangered (EN) 300 Eubalaena glacialis range map.png Right whale size.svg
40–80 tonnes Eubalaena glacialis with calf.jpg
North Pacific right whale Eubalaena japonica
Lacépède, 1818 EN 200 Eubalaena japonica range map.png Right whale size.svg
60–80 tonnes Eubalaena japonica drawing.jpg
Southern right whale Eubalaena australis
Desmoulins, 1822 Least Concern (LC) 7,000 Cetacea range map Southern Right Whale.png Right whale size.svg
40–80 tonnes Southern right whale10.jpg
Family Balaenopteridae: rorquals
See also: Balaenopteridae

Rorquals are the largest group of baleen whales, with 9 species in two genera. They include the largest animal that has ever lived, the blue whale, which can reach 150 tonnes, two others that easily pass 50 tonnes, and even the smallest of the group, the northern minke whale, reaches 9 tonnes. They take their name from a Norwegian word meaning "furrow whale": all members of the family have a series of longitudinal folds of skin running from below the mouth back to the navel (except the sei whale, which has shorter grooves). These are understood to allow the mouth to expand immensely when feeding.[citation needed] All rorquals have ventral grooves, and are the only cetaceans to have them. Additionally, they all have dorsal fins, broad, gently curving rostra and short baleen plates.[1]
Subfamily Balaenopterinae – one genus, eight species
Genus Balaenoptera – eight species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Blue whale Balaenoptera musculus
Linnaeus, 1758 EN 10,000–25,000 Cetacea range map Blue Whale.PNG Blue whale size.svg
100–120 tonnes Bluewhale877.jpg
Bryde's whale Balaenoptera brydei
Olsen, 1913 Data deficient (DD) 90,000–100,000 Balaenoptera brydei range.png Bryde's whale size.svg
14–30 tonnes Balaenoptera brydei.jpg
Common minke whale Balaenoptera acutorostrata
Lacépède, 1804 Least Concern (LC) Unknown Cetacea range map Minke Whale.png Minke whale size.svg
6-11 tonnes Minke.jpg
Fin whale Balaenoptera physalus
Linnaeus, 1758 EN 100,000 Cetacea range map Fin Whale.PNG Fin whale size.svg
45–75 tonnes LMazzuca Fin Whale.jpg
Omura's whale Balaenoptera omurai
Wada et al., 2003 Data deficient (DD) Unknown [cetacean needed]
Pygmy Bryde's whale Balaenoptera edeni
Anderson, 1879 Data deficient (DD) Unknown [cetacean needed] Rorcual Edeni.jpg
Sei whale Balaenoptera borealis
Lesson, 1828 EN 57,000 Cetacea range map Sei Whale.PNG Sei whale size.svg
20–25 tonnes Balaenoptera borealis 2.jpg
Southern minke whale Balaenoptera bonaerensis
Burmeister, 1867 Data Deficient (DD) 515,000 Cetacea range map Antarctic Minke Whale.png Minke whale size.svg
6-10 tonnes Minke whale in ross sea.jpg
Subfamily Megapterinae – 1 genus, 1 species
Genus Megaptera Gray, 1846 – 1 species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Humpback whale Megaptera novaeangliae
Borowski, 1781 LC 80,000 Cetacea range map Humpback Whale.png Humpback whale size.svg
25–30 tonnes Humpback Whale underwater shot.jpg
Family Eschrichtiidae: gray whale
See also: Eschrichtiidae

The gray whale has been placed in a family of its own as it is sufficiently different from the right whales and the rorquals. The gray whale is the only benthic feeding baleen whale, filtering small organisms from the mud of shallow seas. They also have a gestation period of over a year, which is unusual for baleen whales.[1]
Genus Eschrichtius – 1 species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Gray whale Eschrichtius robustus
Lilljeborg, 1861 LC 26,000 Cetacea range map Gray Whale.png Gray whale size.svg
15–40 tonnes Gray whale.jpg
Family Neobalaenidae: pygmy right whale
See also: Neobalaenidae

The pygmy right whale shares several characteristics with the right whales, although having dorsal fins separates them from right whales, and they have a very distinctive jaw configuration. Pygmy right whales' heads are no more than one-fourth the size of their bodies, whereas the right whales' heads are about one-third the size of their bodies.[1]
Genus Caperea Gray, 1864 – 1 species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Pygmy right whale Caperea marginata
Gray, 1846 DD Unknown Cetacea range map Pygmy Right Whale.png Pygmy right whale size.svg
3-3.5 tonnes Caperea marginata 3.jpg
Suborder Odontoceti: toothed whales
Main article: Odontoceti

The toothed whales (systematic name Odontoceti) form a suborder of the cetaceans. As the name suggests, the suborder is characterized by having teeth (rather than baleen). Toothed whales are active hunters, feeding on fish, squid, and in some cases other marine mammals.
Family Delphinidae: oceanic dolphins
See also: Delphinidae

Oceanic dolphins are the members of the Delphinidae family of cetaceans. These aquatic mammals are related to whales and porpoises. As the name implies, these dolphins tend to be found in the open seas, unlike the river dolphins, although a few species such as the Irrawaddy dolphin are coastal or riverine. Six of the larger species in the Delphinidae, the killer whale (orca) and its relatives, are commonly called whales, rather than dolphins. They are also sometimes collectively known as "blackfish".

The Delphinidae are characterised by having distinct beaks (unlike the Phocoenidae), two or more fused cervical vertebrae and 20 or more pairs of teeth in their upper jaws. None is more than 4 m long.[1]
Genus Cephalorhynchus Gray, 1846 – four species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Commerson's dolphin Cephalorhynchus commersonii
Lacépède, 1804 DD 3,400 Cetacea range map Commerson's Dolphin.PNG Commerson's dolphin size.svg
35–60 kilograms Commdolph01.jpg
Chilean dolphin Cephalorhynchus eutropia
Gray, 1846 NT Unknown Cetacea range map Chilean Dolphin.PNG Chilean dolphin size.svg
60 kg Tonino.jpg
Heaviside's dolphin Cephalorhynchus heavisidii
Gray, 1828 DD Unknown Cetacea range map Heaviside's Dolphin.PNG Heaviside's dolphin size.svg
40–75 kg Heaviside-Delphin.jpg
Hector's dolphin Cephalorhynchus hectori
Van Beneden, 1881 EN 2,000–2,500 Cetacea range map Hector's Dolphin.PNG Hector's dolphin size.svg
35–60 kg Hectors Dolphin.jpg
Genus Steno – one species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Rough-toothed dolphin Steno bredanensis
Lesson, 1828 LC 150,000 Cetacea range map Rough-toothed Dolphin.PNG Rough-toothed dolphin size.svg
100–135 kg Rough toothed dolphin.jpg
Genus Sousa – three species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Atlantic humpback dolphin Sousa teuszi
Kükenthal, 1892 DD Unknown Cetacea range map Atlantic Humpback Dolphin.PNG Humpback dolphins size.svg
100–150 kg
Indian humpback dolphin Sousa plumbea
Cuvier, 1829 DD Unknown Cetacea range map Indian Humpback Dolphin.PNG Humpback dolphins size.svg
150–200 kg
Pacific humpback dolphin Sousa chinensis
Osbeck, 1765 DD Unknown Cetacea range map Pacific Humpback Dolphin.PNG Humpback dolphins size.svg
250–280 kg Pink Dolphin.JPG
Genus Sotalia – two species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Costero Sotalia guianensis
Bénéden, 1864 DD Unknown Cetacea range map Tucuxi.png
Solid colour Tucuxi size.svg
35–45 kg
Tucuxi Sotalia fluviatilis
Gervais & Deville, 1853 DD Unknown Cetacea range map Tucuxi.png
Hashed colour Tucuxi size.svg
35–45 kg DELFIN DEL ORINOCO2.JPG
Genus Tursiops – two species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Common bottlenose dolphin Tursiops truncatus
Montagu, 1821 DD Unknown Cypron-Range Tursiops truncatus.svg Bottlenose dolphin size.svg
150–650 kg Bottlenose Dolphin KSC04pd0178.jpg
Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin Tursiops aduncus
Ehrenberg, 1833 DD Unknown Cetacea range map Bottlenose Dolphin.png [cetacean needed]
230 kg Tursiops aduncus, Port River, Adelaide, Australia - 2003.jpg
Burrunan dolphin Tursiops australis DD Unknown [cetacean needed] Burrunan Dolphin (Tursiops australis)-B.png
Genus Stenella Gray, 1866 – five species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Atlantic spotted dolphin Stenella frontalis
Cuvier, 1829 DD 100,000 Verbreitungsgebiet des Zügeldelfins Stenella frontalis.PNG Atlantic spotted dolphin size.svg
100 kg Stenella frontalis.JPG
Clymene dolphin Stenella clymene
Gray, 1846 DD Unknown Cetacea range map Clymene Dolphin.png Clymene dolphin size.svg
75–80 kg Clymenes.jpg
Pantropical spotted dolphin Stenella attenuata
Gray, 1846 CD 3,000,000 Cetacea range map Pantropical Spotted Dolphin.PNG Pantropical spotted dolphin size.svg
100 kg Schlankdelfin.jpg
Spinner dolphin Stenella longirostris
Gray, 1828 CD Unknown Cetacea range map Spinner Dolphin.PNG Spinner dolphin size.svg
90 kg Spinner dolphins.jpg
Striped dolphin Stenella coeruleoalba
Meyen, 1833 CD 2,000,000 Cetacea range map Striped Dolphin.PNG Striped dolphin size.svg
100 kg StripedDolpin.jpg
Genus Delphinus – three species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Short-beaked common dolphin Delphinus delphis
Linnaeus, 1758 LC Cetacea range map Short-beaked Common Dolphin.PNG Common dolphin size.svg
70–110 kg Delphinus delphis with calf.jpg
Arabian common dolphin Delphinus tropicalis
van Bree, 1971 Unknown Unknown Delphinus tropicalis size.svg
65–105 kg
Long-beaked common dolphin Delphinus capensis
Gray, 1828 CD Unknown[2] Cetacea range map Long-beaked Common Dolphin.PNG Common dolphin size.svg
80–150 kg Dolphins Oman-2.jpg
Genus Lagenodelphis – one species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Fraser's dolphin Lagenodelphis hosei
Fraser, 1956 DD Unknown Cetacea range map Fraser'sDolphin.png Fraser's dolphin size.svg
209 kg Frazer´s dolphin group.jpg
Genus Lagenorhynchus Gray, 1846 – six species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Atlantic white-sided dolphin Lagenorhynchus acutus
Gray, 1828 LC 200,000 – 300,000 Cetacea range map Atlantic White-sided Dolphin.PNG Atlantic white-sided dolphin size.svg
235 kg Lagenorhyncus acutus.jpg
Dusky dolphin Lagenorhynchus obscurus
Gray, 1828 DD Unknown Cetacea range map Dusky Dolphin.PNG Dusky dolphin size.svg
100 kg DuskyDolphin.jpg
Hourglass dolphin Lagenorhynchus cruciger
Quoy & Gaimard, 1824 LC 140,000 Cetacea range map Hourglass Dolphin.PNG Hourglass dolphin size.svg
90–120 kg Hourglas dolphin.jpg
Pacific white-sided dolphin Lagenorhynchus obliquidens
Gill, 1865 LC 1,000,000 Cetacea range map Pacific White-sided Dolphin.PNG Pacific white-sided dolphin size.svg
85–150 kg Pacific white side dolphin.jpg
Peale's dolphin Lagenorhynchus australis
Peale, 1848 DD Unknown[3] Cetacea range map Black-chinned Dolphin.PNG Peale's dolphin size.svg
115 kg Lagenorhynchus australis.jpg
White-beaked dolphin Lagenorhynchus albirostris
Gray, 1846 LC 100,000[4] Cetacea range map White-beaked Dolphin.PNG White-beaked dolphin size.svg
180 kg White beaked dolphin.jpg
Genus Lissodelphis – two species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Northern right whale dolphin Lissodelphis borealis
Peale, 1848 LC 400,000[5] Cetacea range map Northern Right Whale Dolphin.PNG Northern right whale dolphin size.svg
115 kg Northern right whale dolphin.jpg
Southern right whale dolphin Lissodelphis peronii
Lacépède, 1804 DD Unknown[6] Cetacea range map Southern Right Whale Dolphin.PNG Southern right whale dolphin size.svg
60–100 kg
Genus Grampus – one species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Risso's dolphin Grampus griseus
G. Cuvier, 1812 DD Unknown[7] Grampus griseus distribution.png Risso's dolphin size.svg
300 kg Rundkopfdelfin.jpg
Genus Peponocephala – one species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Melon-headed whale Peponocephala electra
Gray, 1846 LC Unknown[8] Cetacea range map Melon-headed Whale.PNG Melon-headed whale size.svg
225 kg Melon-headed whale large.jpg
Genus Feresa – one species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Pygmy killer whale Feresa attenuata
Gray, 1875 DD Unknown[9] Cetacea range map Pygmy Killer Whale.PNG Pygmy killer whale size.svg
160–350 kg
Genus Pseudorca – one species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
False killer whale Pseudorca crassidens
Owen, 1846 LC Unknown[10] Cetacea range map False Killer Whale.PNG False killer whale size.svg
1.5-2 tonnes False killer whale 890002.jpg
Genus Orcinus – one species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Killer whale Orcinus orca
Linnaeus, 1758 CD 100,000[11] Cetacea range map Orca.PNG Orca size-2.svg
4.5 tonnes Killerwhales jumping.jpg
Genus Globicephala – two species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Long-finned pilot whale Globicephala melas
Traill, 1809 LC Unknown[12] Cetacea range map Long-finned Pilot Whale.PNG Long-finned pilot whale size.svg
3-3.5 tonnes Pilotwal2.JPG
Short-finned pilot whale Globicephala macrorhynchus
Gray, 1846 CD Unknown[13] Cetacea range map Short-finned Pilot Whale.png Short-finned pilot whale size.svg
1–3 tonnes Short-finned Pilot Whale 1.jpg
Genus Orcaella Gray, 1866 – two species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Australian snubfin dolphin Orcaella heinsohni
Beasley, Robertson & Arnold, 2005 Unknown Unknown Orcaella heinsohni range.png Orcaella heinsohni size.svg
130–145 kg
Irrawaddy dolphin Orcaella brevirostris
Gray, 1866 DD Unknown Cetacea range map Irrawaddy Dolphin.PNG Irrawaddy dolphin size.svg
130 kg Orcaella brevirostris 1878.jpg
Family Monodontidae: narwhal and beluga
See also: Monodontidae

The cetacean family Monodontidae comprises two unusual whale species, the narwhal, in which the male has a long tusk, and the white beluga.

The Monodontidae lack dorsal fins, which have been replaced by tough, fibrous ridges just behind the midpoints of their bodies and are probably an adaptation to swimming under ice, as both do in their Arctic habitat. The flippers are small, rounded and tend to curl up at the ends in adulthood. All, or almost all, the cervical vertebrae are unfused, allowing their heads to be turned independently of their bodies. None has any throat grooves.[1]
Genus Monodon – one species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Narwhal(e) Monodon monoceros
Linnaeus, 1758 DD 25,000[14] Cetacea range map Narwhal.png Narwhal size.svg
900-1,500 kilograms Narwhals breach.jpg
Genus Delphinapterus – one species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Beluga Delphinapterus leucas
Pallas, 1776 Vulnerable (VU) 100,000[15] Cetacea range map Beluga.png Beluga size.svg
1.5 tonnes Belugawhale MMC.jpg
Family Phocoenidae: porpoises
See also: Phocoenidae

Porpoises are small cetaceans of the family Phocoenidae. They are distinct from dolphins, although the word "porpoise" has been used to refer to any small dolphin, especially by sailors and fishermen. The most obvious visible difference between the two groups is porpoises have spatulate (flattened) teeth distinct from the conical teeth of dolphins. In addition, porpoises are relatively r-selected compared with dolphins: that is, they rear more young more quickly than dolphins. All six species have small flippers, notched tail flukes, and no beaks. All carry at least 11 pairs of small teeth in their upper and lower jaws.

Porpoises, divided into six species, live in all oceans, mostly near the shore. Probably best known is the harbour porpoise, which can be found across the Northern Hemisphere.
Genus Neophocaena – one species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Finless porpoise Neophocaena phocaenoides
Cuvier, 1829 DD[16] Unknown[17] Cetacea range map Finless Porpoise.PNG Finless porpoise size.svg
30–45 kg FinlessPorpoise2.jpg
Genus Phocoena – four species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Harbour porpoise Phocoena phocoena
Linnaeus, 1758 VU Unknown[18] Cetacea range map Harbour Porpoise.PNG Harbour porpoise size.svg
75 kg Porpoise touching.jpg
Vaquita Phocoena sinus
Norris & McFarland, 1958 Critically Endangered (CE) 500[19] Cetacea range map Vaquita.PNG Vaquita size.svg
50 kg Vaquita2 Olson NOAA crop2.jpg
Spectacled porpoise Phocoena dioptrica
Lahille, 1912 DD Unknown[20] Cetacea range map Spectacled Porpoise.PNG Spectacled porpoise size.svg
60–84 kg SpectacledPorpoise.jpg
Burmeister's porpoise Phocoena spinipinnis
Burmeister, 1865 DD Unknown[21] Cetacea range map Burmeister's Porpoise.PNG Burmeister's porpoise size.svg
50–75 kg
Genus Phocoenoides – 1 species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Dall's porpoise Phocoenoides dalli
True, 1885 CD 1,100,000[22] Cetacea range map Dall's Porpoise.PNG Dall's porpoise size.svg
130–200 kg Dalls Porpoise Underwater.JPG
Family Physeteridae: sperm whale
See also: Physeteridae

The sperm whale characteristically has a large, squarish head one-third the length of its body; the blowhole is slightly to the left hand side; the skin is usually wrinkled; and it has no teeth on the upper jaw.
Genus Physeter – one species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Sperm whale Physeter macrocephalus
Linnaeus, 1758 VU 200,000–2,000,000[23] Cetacea range map Sperm Whale 4.PNG Sperm whale size.svg
25–50 tonnes Mother and baby sperm whale.jpg
Family Kogiidae: dwarf and pygmy sperm whales
See also: Kogiidae

The dwarf and pygmy sperm whales resemble sperm whales, but are far smaller. They are dark grey, dorsally, while ventrally they are lighter. They have blunt, squarish heads with narrow, underslung jaws; the flippers are set far forward, close to the head and their dorsal fins are set far back down the body.
Genus Kogia – two species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Dwarf sperm whale Kogia sima
Owen, 1866 LC Unknown[24] Cetacea range map Dwarf Sperm Whale.png Dwarf sperm whale size.svg
250 kg Kogia sima.jpg
Pygmy sperm whale Kogia breviceps
Blainville, 1838 LC Unknown[24] Kogia breviceps range.png Pygmy sperm whale size.svg
400 kg Kogia breviceps.jpg
Family Ziphiidae: beaked whales
See also: Ziphiidae

A beaked whale is any of at least 21 species of small whale in the family Ziphiidae. They are one of the least-known families of large mammals: several species have only been described in the last two decades, and it is entirely possible that more remain as yet undiscovered. Six genera have been identified.

They possess a unique feeding mechanism known as suction feeding. Instead of catching their prey with teeth, it is sucked into their oral cavity. Their tongue can move very freely, and when suddenly retracted at the same time as the gular floor is distended, the pressure immediately drops within their mouth and the prey is sucked in with the water. The family members are characterized by having a lower jaw that extends at least to the tip of the upper jaw, a shallow or non-existent notch between the tail flukes, a dorsal fin set well back on the body, three of four fused cervical vertebrae, extensive skull asymmetry and two conspicuous throat grooves forming a 'V' pattern.[1]
Genus Ziphius – one species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Cuvier's beaked whale Ziphius cavirostris
G. Cuvier, 1823 DD Unknown[25] Cetacea range map Cuvier's Beaked Whale.PNG Cuvier's beaked whale size.svg
2–3 tonnes Cuviers beaked whale-swfsc.jpg
Genus Berardius – two species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Arnoux's beaked whale Berardius arnuxii
Duvernoy, 1851 CD Unknown[26] Cetacea range map Arnoux 27s Beaked Whale.png Arnoux's beaked whale size.svg
8 tonnes Berardius arnuxii.jpg
Baird's beaked whale Berardius bairdii
Stejneger, 1883 CD Unknown[27] Cetacea range map Baird 27s Beaked Whale.png Baird's beaked whale size.svg
12 tonnes
Genus Tasmacetus – one species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Shepherd's beaked whale Tasmacetus shepherdi
Oliver, 1937 DD Unknown[28] Cetacea range map Shepherd 27s Beaked Whale.png Shepherd's beaked whale size.svg
2-2.5 tonnes
Subfamily Hyperoodontidae – three genera, 17 species
Genus Indopacetus – one species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Tropical bottlenose whale Indopacetus pacificus
Longman, 1926 DD Unknown[29] Cetacea range map Longman 27s Beaked Whale.png Indopacetus pacificus size.svg
3,5-4 tonnes
Genus Hyperoodon – two species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Northern bottlenose whale Hyperoodon ampullatus
Forster, 1770 CD 10,000[30] Cetacea range map Northern Bottlenose Whale.PNG Northern bottlenose whale size.svg
7 tonnes Faroe stamp 200 Hyperoodon ampullatus.jpg
Southern bottlenose whale Hyperoodon planifrons
Flower, 1882 CD 500,000 Cetacea range map Southern Bottlenose Whale.PNG Southern bottlenose whale size.svg
6 tonnes
Genus Mesoplodon Gervais, 1850 – 14 species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Andrews' beaked whale Mesoplodon bowdoini
Andrews, 1908 DD Unknown Cetacea range map Andrews Beaked Whale.png Andrew's beaked whale size.svg
1 tonne
Spade-toothed whale Mesoplodon traversii, syn. Mesoplodon bahamondi
Gray, 1874 DD Unknown Mesoplodon traversii distribution.png Mesoplodon bahamondi size.svg
1.2 tonnes
Blainville's beaked whale Mesoplodon densirostris
Blainville, 1817 DD Unknown Cetacea range map Blainvilles Beaked Whale.png Blainville's beaked whale size.svg Behavioral response study andros island bahamas 2007.JPG
Gervais' beaked whale Mesoplodon europaeus
Gervais, 1855 DD Unknown Cetacea range map Gervais Beaked Whale.png Gervais' beaked whale size.svg
1.2 tonnes
Ginkgo-toothed beaked whale Mesoplodon ginkgodens
Nishiwaki & Kamiya, 1958 DD Unknown Cetacea range map Ginkgo-toothed Beaked Whale.png Ginkgo-toothed beaked whale size.svg
1.5 tonnes
Gray's beaked whale Mesoplodon grayi
von Haast, 1876 DD Unknown Cetacea range map Grays Beaked Whale.png Gray's beaked whale size.svg
1.5 tonnes
Hector's beaked whale Mesoplodon hectori
Gray, 1871 DD Unknown Cetacea range map Hectors Beaked Whale.png Hector's beaked whale size.svg
1 tonne
Hubbs' beaked whale Mesoplodon carlhubbsi
Moore, 1963 DD Unknown Cetacea range map Hubbs Beaked Whale.png Hubb's beaked whale size.svg
1.4 tonnes
Perrin's beaked whale Mesoplodon perrini
Dalebout, Mead, Baker, Baker, & van Helding, 2002 DD Unknown Mesoplodon perrini size.svg
1.3–1.5 tonnes
Pygmy beaked whale Mesoplodon peruvianus
Reyes, Mead, and Van Waerebeek, 1991 DD Unknown Cetacea range map Pygmy Beaked Whale.png Mesoplodon peruvianus size.svg
800 kg
Sowerby's beaked whale Mesoplodon bidens
Sowerby, 1804 DD Unknown Cetacea range map Sowerbys Beaked Whale.png Sowerby's beaked whale size.svg
1-1.3 tonnes Faroe stamp 197 Mesoplodon bidens.jpg
Stejneger's beaked whale Mesoplodon stejnegeri
True, 1885 DD Unknown Cetacea range map Stejneger sBeaked Whale.png Stejneger's beaked whale size.svg
1.5 tonnes
Strap-toothed whale Mesoplodon layardii
Gray, 1865 DD Unknown Cetacea range map Layards Beaked Whale.png Straptoothed whale size.svg
2 tonnes
True's beaked whale Mesoplodon mirus
True, 1913 DD Unknown Cetacea range map Trues Beaked Whale.png True's beaked whale size.svg
1.4 tonnes Mesoplodon mirus.jpg
Superfamily Platanistoidea: river dolphins
See also: Platanistoidea

River dolphins are five species of dolphins which reside in freshwater rivers and estuaries. They are classed in the Platanistoidea superfamily of cetaceans. Four species live in fresh water rivers. The fifth species, the La Plata dolphin, lives in saltwater estuaries and the ocean. However, it is scientifically classed in the river dolphin family rather than the oceanic dolphin family. All species have adaptations to facilitate fish catching: a long, forceps-like beak with numerous small teeth in both jaws, broad flippers to allow tight turns, small eyes, and unfused neck vertebrae to allow the head to move in relation to the body.
Family Iniidae: river dolphins
Main article: Iniidae

This family contains one genus of two species, although the Amazon river dolphin (I. geoffrensis) has been divided into three subspecies:

I. geoffrensis geoffrensis – Amazon basin population (excluding Madeira river drainage area, above the Teotonio Rapids in Bolivia)
I. geoffrensis humboldtiana – Orinoco basin population
Bolivian river dolphin – I. g. boliviensis – Amazon basin population in the Madeira drainage area


Genus Inia – two species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Amazon river dolphin Inia geoffrensis
Blainville, 1817 VU Unknown Cetacea range map Amazon River Dolphin.PNG Amazon river dolphin size.svg
150 kg Inia geoffrensis.jpg
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Araguaian river dolphin Inia araguaiaensis
Hrbek, Da Silva, Dutra, Farias, 2014 Unknown Unknown Inia range map PLoS ONE.jpg
Araguaian river dolphin in blue Amazon river dolphin size.svg
150 kg Inia araguaiaensis cranium & mandible PLoS ONE.jpg
Family Lipotidae: baiji
Main article: Lipotidae

The Lipotidae family is another monotypic taxon, containing only the baiji. Fossil records suggest the dolphin first appeared 25 million years ago and migrated from the Pacific Ocean to the Yangtze River 20 million years ago.[31] The species was declared functionally extinct in 2006 after an expedition to record population numbers found no specimens.
Genus Lipotes – one species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
Baiji Lipotes vexillifer
Miller, 1918 CE, possibly extinct 13[32] Cetacea range map Chinese River Dolphin.PNG Baiji size.svg
130 kg Lipotes vexillifer.png
Family Platanistidae: South Asian river dolphin
Main article: Platanistidae

The Platanistidae were originally thought to hold only one species (the South Asian river dolphin), but based on differences in skull structure, vertebrae and lipid composition, scientists declared the two populations as separate species in the early 1970s.[33] In 1998, the results of these studies were questioned and the classification reverted to the pre-1970 consensus. Thus, at present, two subspecies are recognized in the genus Platanista, P. gangetica minor (the Indus dolphin) and P. g. gangetica (the Ganges river dolphin).[34]
Genus Platanista – one species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
South Asian river dolphin Platanista gangetica
Roxburgh, 1801 EN 1,100[35] Cetacea range map South Asian river dolphin.png South Asian river dolphin size comparison.svg
200 kg Schnabeldelphin-drawing.jpg
Family Pontoporiidae: La Plata river dolphin
Main article: Pontoporiidae

The La Plata river dolphin is the only species of the Pontoporiidae family and of the Pontoporia genus.
Genus Pontoporia – one species
Common name Scientific name Status Population Distribution Size Picture
La Plata dolphin Pontoporia blainvillei
Gervais & d'Orbigny, 1844 DD 4,000–4,500 Cetacea range map La Plata River Dolphin.PNG La plata dolphin size.svg
50 kg Pontoporia blainvillei.jpg
See also
Portal icon Cetaceans portal

List of whale vocalizations
Evolution of cetaceans
List of extinct cetaceans
Archaeoceti
Mammal classification

Notes and references

Martin, Dr. Anthony R. (1991). Whales and Dolphins. London: Salamander Books. ISBN 0-8160-3922-4.
The total population is unknown but numbers in the hundreds of thousands.
Total population unknown but thought to be locally common – it is the most common dolphin found around the Falkland Islands
Estimates of various stocks throughout the North Atlantic give an overall value into the high tens or low hundreds of thousands.
Varying population estimates for areas around California and the North Pacific give a total of up to 400,000
Surveys suggest this is the most common dolphin off of Chilean waters.
The population around the continental shelf of the United States has been recorded to be in excess of 60,000. In the Pacific, a census recorded 175,000 individuals in eastern tropical waters and 85,000 in the west. No global estimate of population exists.
Estimates for eastern tropical Pacific are 45,000 and another recent survey estimates population to be 1,200 for the eastern Sulu Sea, no global estimate is known.
The only population estimate is of 38,900 individuals in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean
The total population is unknown. The eastern Pacific was estimated to have in excess of 40,000 individuals and is probably the home of the largest grouping.
Local estimates include 70–80,000 in the Antarctic, 8,000 in the tropical Pacific (although tropical waters are not the orca's preferred environment, the sheer size of this area — 19 million square kilometres — means there are thousands of orcas), up to 2,000 off Japan, 1,500 off the cooler northeast Pacific and 1,500 off Norway.
Total population is not known. There are estimated to be in excess of 200,000 in the Southern Ocean. The North Atlantic population is not known.
Total population not known. There are 150,000 individuals in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. There are estimated to be more than 30,000 animals in the western Pacific, off the coast of Japan.
Aerial surveys suggest a population of around 20,000 individuals. When submerged animals are also taken into account, the true figure may be in excess of 25,000.
There are estimated to be 40,000 individuals in the Beaufort Sea, 25,000 in Hudson Bay, 18,000 in the Bering Sea and 28,000 in the Canadian High Arctic. The population in the St. Lawrence estuary is estimated to be around 1000.
There are not enough data to place finless porpoises on the endangered species list, except in China, where they are endangered. Their propensity for staying close to shore places them in great danger from fishing.
There are no good estimates of the animals' abundance. However a comparison of two surveys, one from the late 1970s and the other from 1999/2000 shows a decline in population and distribution.
Several surveys have been taken, although large gaps of data are missing, so an overall value cannot be achieved. In the eastern Pacific Ocean: Central California 4,120; Northern California 9,250; Oregon and Washington 26,175. In the Atlantic Ocean: Gulf of Maine 67,500; Skagerrak and Belt Seas 36,046; North Sea 279,367; Ireland and western UK 36,280.
Only few serious attempts have been made to estimate the total size of the vaquita population. Varying numbers have been obtained although an average of about 500 is usually found.
Nothing is known of the abundance of this porpoise. It was the most commonly encountered species during preliminary beach surveys undertaken on Tierra del Fuego.
There are no quantitative data on abundance.
The most recent estimate for the North Pacific and Bering Sea is 1,186,000.
The total number of sperm whales throughout the world is unknown. Crude estimates, obtained by surveying small areas and extrapolating the result to all the world's oceans, range from 200,000 to 2,000,000 individuals.
No global population estimates have been made. One survey estimated a population of about 11,000 in the eastern Pacific.
Because of the difficulty of identifying the species the total global population is unknown.
Arnoux's beaked whales seem to be relatively abundant in Cook Strait during summer
Virtually nothing is known about the abundance of Baird's beaked whales, except they are not rare as was formerly thought.
Nothing is known about the relative abundance of this species or its population composition.
A 2002 survey estimates there are 766 animals around Hawaii. No other population estimates exist for other locales.
Total population is unknown but likely to be of the order of 10,000.
Wang, Yongchen (2007-01-10). "Farewell to the Baiji". China Dialogue. Retrieved 2007-05-29.
A survey from November–December 2006 failed to find any individuals. Another survey, from 1997, counted only 13 individuals. In 1986, surveys estimated the number to be at about 300.
Pilleri, G., Marcuzzi, G. and Pilleri, O., 1982. Speciation in the Platanistoidea, systematic, zoogeographical and ecological observations on recent species. Investigations on Cetacea, 14: 15–46.
Rice, DW (1998). Marine mammals of the world: Systematics and distribution. Society for Marine Mammalogy. ISBN 978-1-891276-03-3.
Estimates give values of 1,100 Indus river dolphins and maybe as few as 20 Ganges river dolphins.

General references

Rice, Dale W. (1998). Marine mammals of the world: systematics and distribution. Society of Marine Mammalogy, Special Publication No. 4. ISBN 1891276034.
Mead, J. G.; Brownell, R. L., Jr. (2005). "Order Cetacea". In Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M. Mammal Species of the World (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 723–743. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494.
"Red List of Threatened Species". IUCN. Archived from the original on 2006-11-02. Retrieved 2006-11-09.

External links
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MISSOSOLOGISTS are OFFICIALLY part of the MISSOSOLOGY FAMILY.
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Re: WOOO YVETHE SANTIAGO

Postby Marco Polo » Mon Nov 17, 2014 6:17 pm

I wonder how you came up as VIP member while you behave like a low class creature.... =b
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Re: WOOO YVETHE SANTIAGO

Postby I Am A Woman REALLY! » Mon Nov 17, 2014 8:14 pm


Topic: JEALOUSY

From: Psychology Today

Title: Surviving (your child's) adolescence
Welcome to the hard half of parenting
by Carl Pickhardt, Ph.D.

Adolescent Adjustment to a Second Child

Loss of being only child can cause envy and resentment, but only for a while

Published on March 11, 2013 by Carl E. Pickhardt, Ph.D. in Surviving (Your Child's) Adolescence

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It can be hard in early adolescence (around age 9 – 13) to have a little brother or sister who is captivating parental attention at a time when one is beginning the separation from childhood, is becoming more challenging for parents to live with, and increasingly is falling out of their traditional favor just as an adorable younger sibling is falling in.



An aggrieved ten-year-old described his adjustment something like this. “I don’t matter in the family like I used to. Now everything’s my younger sister. She’s so loveable and I’m nothing but trouble, the way I’ve changed. They enjoy her, but they’re always criticizing me. And when she plays with my stuff, it’s no big deal. They make excuses and say they’ll talk to her. But she just does it again. I should remember, she’s just a little kid, that’s what they tell me. She’ll grow out of it they say. And if I get angry and tease to get her back, that just makes things worse. They take her side. Who’s on my side? They’re playing favorites is how I see it, but they say ‘no.’ I don't believe them. She’s so special. They make a big deal of everything she learns to do. There’s nothing special they notice about me, except my being a problem. In my home, the youngest kid gets to rule!”



Related Links



Adolescent Adjustment to a Second Child
Does a Disability Make A Sibling Relationship Stronger? (Part I)
National Sibling Conference
Till Death (of Our Parents) Do Us Part
Holidays With Family: Repairing Sibling Relations



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In general, it’s a significant adjustment for everyone in the family when the number of children increases from one to two. For parents, what this new member of the family means, in addition to them assuming more responsibility and having to broker competing and conflicting needs between multiple children, is accepting a reduction in what they have been accustomed to provide. Now they can no longer give to child number one as much focus as they once did, and they can never give to child number two all the attention that they previously lavished on their first born. Now they have to divide out the parenting they give.



As for child number one, she has been both dethroned and demoted at the same time. Now she is no longer the sole player on the family stage because of having to share parental admiration and applause with this new arrival. Her ruling position as sole performer for their devoted audience is over. Thus she has been dethroned. In addition, she has been demoted. As an only child, she considered herself one of the family three, identifying with the parents, the grown-up “we.” Now, however, she has been demoted to one of the lower status “they,” reduced to being considered as just one of the kids.



This dethronement and demotion can be more keenly felt when the second sibling’s arrival coincides with the elder’s entry into adolescence. Now young person begins pushing against and pulling away from parental authority for more social freedom. While the younger sibling is happy being dependent on parental care and living contentedly within the family circle, the adolescent bridles at family rules and restraints that limit his growing need for more independence and being out in the world with friends.



While the younger child loves being cuddled and hugged by parents, the older becomes less welcoming of this physical affection because he is growing too old to accept their loving touch. And yet, it can gall him to see the younger child enjoying physical intimacy with parents that the adolescent has given up, but still misses none-the-less. Add this to the list of all the care-taking tasks parents do for the younger that they no longer provide the adolescent and you can appreciate some of the envy and resentment that an early adolescent can sometimes feel.



A final slight can occur if the early adolescent notices how parents are more free and easy and fun loving with the younger child than they were with her, their trial child (the first experience with parenting they had.) Back then they were inexperienced and insecure. They were seriously concerned about what was right and wrong to do, tense with worry about whether their first born was going to be okay. Although parents may claim they treated her the same way as they do the younger child, she knows better because she has seen them change. They were never so loose and relaxed with her, the one with whom the anxious introduction to parenting began.



So what can parents do to help ease the early adolescent’s adjustment to a second child? The answer is, quite a lot. Consider ten options.



1) They can create opportunities for their older child to have time with each parent separately and with both parents together with the younger child not present, so the adolescent can feel special from enjoying this dedicated attention.



2) They can make a conscious effort to keep a positive attitude as they contend with the more negatively perceived changes in their early adolescent – the disorganization, complaining attitude, active and passive resistance, and limit testing that early adolescent typically exhibits.



3) They can emphasize the privileges of being the oldest – getting to do and have much that is denied the youngest child.



4) They can help the adolescent appreciate how they are looked up to by the younger child who prizes time with the more grown up, knowledgeable, and capable older sibling.



5) They can encourage the older child to take a leadership (and esteem-filling) role by teaching the younger child how to learn new knowledge and skills.



6) They can be vigilant in responding with attention, approval, and appreciation to the growth changes and accomplishments in their older child.



7) They can arrange special contacts for the early adolescent to get with extended family members and family friends who are eager to enjoy her company and excited to affirm how she grows.



8) They can let her know that although they may have more disagreements and tensions between them now, that is an expected part of her growing older and wanting more independence, and any problems that are encountered are the exception to the rule which is that most of the time she manages herself very well in their eyes.



9) They can let her know that the older she grows, the more often she will find them difficult to live with, more frequently in the way of what she wants, but hopefully she will see that as the exception to the rule that mostly she appreciates their loving care.



10) Finally, they do have to monitor the safety of the sibling relationship so that anger at displacement and demotion, and determination to dominate in the older do not result in bullying or hurt of the younger which could do lasting harm.



Fortunately, in most cases jealousy and concerns with parental favoritism toward the younger child tend to subside as growth into mid adolescence (ages 13 – 15) and forming a family of friends takes hold. As the teenager becomes more socially independent, preoccupied with peers, and less focused on family, parental coddling that the dependent younger child receives matters much less.



Call it progress: the little brother or sister who used to feel like a serious threat now just seems like an aggravating pest. To make matters even better, occasionally this former rival can become a source of affirmation. For example, when the teenager has had a really down social day at school, being greeted by a much younger sibling who looks up to him can provide a really welcome, ‘welcome home.’



For more about parenting adolescents, see my book, “SURVIVING YOUR CHILD’S ADOLESCENCE” (Wiley, 2013.) Information at www.carlpickhardt.com



I welcome questions and suggestions for future blogs.



Next week’s entry: Adolescence and the Marketplace Influence
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Re: WOOO YVETHE SANTIAGO

Postby goddessoxana27 » Mon Nov 17, 2014 10:05 pm

Dear FORUMERS,

Let us revisit a thread that doesn't show any proof that this thread has a valid claim!!!! (Translate nyo sa tagalog para mapraning ang baliw na TS na yan!)

http://www.missosology.info/forum/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=517029

for me this is VALID or REAL if the TS will:

1. show his ticket and entry-exit to the point of destination
2. holding a japanese newspaper that shows the DATE WHEN THIS CREATURE STAY IN TOKYO.
3. HOTEL BOOKING receipts and pictorials with the MI 2014 candidates with sash of course!

kayo na ang humatol!!!

Image
Last edited by goddessoxana27 on Tue Nov 18, 2014 6:54 am, edited 1 time in total.
CREDITS TO THE OWNER OF THE POSTED ARTICLES, VIDEOS, AND PICTURES...

RESPECT, BEAUTY, HEALTHY, OBEDIENT, SMART and FRIENDLY, that's the essence of being a Goddess.
User avatar
goddessoxana27
PAGEANT SPECIALISTS are seasoned ANALYSTS of pageantry.
PAGEANT SPECIALISTS are seasoned ANALYSTS of pageantry.
 
Posts: 6131
Joined: Sun Mar 11, 2012 8:48 pm
Country: Philippines (ph)
Reputation: 3930
Real Life Name/Nick: DyosaGandah
Date of Birth: 01 Jan 1915
Gender: Male
Sexual Orientation: -----------
Profession: ----------------------------------
Hobbies/Interests: --------------------------
Message: Thank you for giving me a chance to become a member of this prestigious group.

  • -3

Re: WOOO YVETHE SANTIAGO

Postby Pacifica Diaz » Tue Nov 18, 2014 4:15 am

hey thaiboy!

don't be so arrogant....dont bash the philippine representatives because you might get some KARMA to your country's representatives.

Relax....relax...shake..shake!
User avatar
Pacifica Diaz
MISSOSOLOGISTS are OFFICIALLY part of the MISSOSOLOGY FAMILY.
MISSOSOLOGISTS are OFFICIALLY part of the MISSOSOLOGY FAMILY.
 
Posts: 1369
Joined: Mon Jan 13, 2014 9:37 am
Country: Brazil (br)
Reputation: 786
Real Life Name/Nick: Pacifica Diaz
Date of Birth: 01 Jan 1962
Gender: Female
Sexual Orientation: Asexual
Profession: spa owner
Western Zodiac Sign: Capricorn
Chinese Zodiac: Horse
Hobbies/Interests: swimming
Message: Beauty is where happiness is

  • 0

Re: WOOO YVETHE SANTIAGO

Postby RatedX » Tue Nov 18, 2014 2:16 pm

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